26 episodes

Many Roads to Here (MRH), a podcast produced entirely by volunteers, tells the story of our nation’s newcomers in their own words, bringing the voices of immigrants, refugees, and asylum seekers to a national conversation about migration and identity. We advance the national dialogue around race and identity and dispel the myths, stereotypes and preconceptions that haunt immigrants. We aim not to preach, but to inform--and, better yet, empathize.



MRH is a production of The Immigrant Story (TIS), a trusted storytelling organization based in the Pacific Northwest. MRH is committed to centering the stories of immigrants and refugees of color, whose voices have been marginalized in the U.S. We strive to reflect the national discourse. In order to combat erasure of immigrants, our interviews are archived at the Oregon Historical Society. In this way, we put those voices into an institution that preserves their narratives for future researchers.



Our podcast illuminates the broader themes of human migration, persecution and refuge, and demonstrates that these storytellers are our neighbors. We believe the stories in Many Roads to Here invite listeners to take stock of their own life experiences, and to view newcomers to America with a new perspective and, we hope, respect.

Many Roads to Here The Immigrant Story

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 21 Ratings

Many Roads to Here (MRH), a podcast produced entirely by volunteers, tells the story of our nation’s newcomers in their own words, bringing the voices of immigrants, refugees, and asylum seekers to a national conversation about migration and identity. We advance the national dialogue around race and identity and dispel the myths, stereotypes and preconceptions that haunt immigrants. We aim not to preach, but to inform--and, better yet, empathize.



MRH is a production of The Immigrant Story (TIS), a trusted storytelling organization based in the Pacific Northwest. MRH is committed to centering the stories of immigrants and refugees of color, whose voices have been marginalized in the U.S. We strive to reflect the national discourse. In order to combat erasure of immigrants, our interviews are archived at the Oregon Historical Society. In this way, we put those voices into an institution that preserves their narratives for future researchers.



Our podcast illuminates the broader themes of human migration, persecution and refuge, and demonstrates that these storytellers are our neighbors. We believe the stories in Many Roads to Here invite listeners to take stock of their own life experiences, and to view newcomers to America with a new perspective and, we hope, respect.

    It Is a Genuine Reconciliation

    It Is a Genuine Reconciliation

    Emmanuel Turaturanye was born and raised in a small town in Rwanda called Ngoma. His whole life he was taught by his parents to love and respect everyone, regardless of their background.  At an early age, he learned that wasn’t true for everyone. Out of the 11 people in his household, he was one of three that survived when the Rwandan genocide took the lives of hundreds of thousands of Tutsis in the spring of 1994. Here is his journey of survival and forgiveness.



    Many Roads to Here is a production of The Immigrant Story. This episode was produced by Giulia Fiaoni. Audio editing was done by Giulia Fiaoni, with post production by Gregg Palmer. Our executive producer is Sankar Raman.



    For more about Emmanuel's experience, head to our website where you can watch the documentary, “To Bear Witness: Reconciliation" produced by The Immigrant Story in collaboration with NW Documentary.



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmQ5hMFuu2U



    Many Roads to Here are expanding. We’re looking for radio producers, especially those from immigrant communities and communities of color, to join our team. We’re all-volunteer for now, but we’ve got dreams. Please email mrh@theimmigrantstory.org for more information.



    For more stories, visit theimmigrantstory.org/manyroads, listen live at prp.fm, or stream us wherever you get your podcasts.

    • 34 min
    There is Surviving and There is Living

    There is Surviving and There is Living

    Saron Khut was only ten years old when he and his family fled the Khmer Rouge-led genocide in Cambodia. His mother’s strength and a key decision one scary  night to take a risk for freedom has guided his sense of purpose ever since.



    Many Roads to Here is a production of The Immigrant Story, a nonprofit based in Portland, Oregon. This episode was written by Degen Larkin and Fran Silverman. Our audio editing was done by Degen Larkin assisted by Gregg Palmer and Richard March. Original music by Corey Larkin. The original interview was conducted in Fall of 2020 by Garrett Russell. Our executive producer is Sankar Raman.



    For more about Saron’s experience, head to our website where you can watch the documentary, “To Bear Witness: Building Community” produced by The Immigrant Story in collaboration with NW Documentary. 



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5T4NiXOtjic



    This episode is made possible by a generous contribution by Oregon Cultural Trust. 



    For more stories, visit theimmigrantstory.org/manyroads, listen live at prp.fm, or stream us wherever you get your podcasts.

    • 30 min
    That Little Girl Got a Shock

    That Little Girl Got a Shock

    Originally from Taiwan, Janet Liu's family spent years trying to build a home together in the United States despite restrictive immigration policies at that time.  Janet had always wanted an opportunity to build a relationship with her father, who had left to study in the United States when she was only four years old. After six years, they were finally able to reunify and connect, until a single unexpected day shattered Janet’s family.



    Many Roads to Here is a production of The Immigrant Story.



    This episode was produced by Natalia Lopez with audio editing by Rick March and assisted by Greg Palmer. The original interview was conducted by our Executive producer, Sankar Raman. Thank you to St. Andrew Lutheran Church in Beaverton, Oregon for the use of their space for recording.



    This episode is a part of a series exploring the stories and experiences of Asian Americans in a climate of Anti-Asian rhetoric and increasing violence. It is produced as part of the Oregon Rises Above Hate coalition and made possible by a generous contribution by Anne Naito-Campbell.



    To learn more please visit oregonrisesabovehate.com. For more stories, visit theimmigrantstory.org/manyroads, listen live at prp.fm, or stream us wherever you get your podcasts.

    • 30 min
    I was a child of revolution

    I was a child of revolution

    Sara Houranpay describes herself as a child of the revolution. She grew up during the Iranian Revolution. Her family fled to the United States,  hoping for greater freedom. But they instead found themselves again at the center of conflict, when the protests of summer 2020 threatened their family livelihood.



    Many Roads to Here is a production of The Immigrant Story. 



    This episode was produced by Mae Ghylin with audio editing by Rick March and assisted by Greg Palmer. The original interview was conducted by our Executive producer, Sankar Raman. Thank you to St. Andrew Lutheran Church in Beaverton, Oregon for the use of their space for recording.



    This episode is a part of a series exploring the stories and experiences of Asian Americans in a climate of Anti-Asian rhetoric and increasing violence. It is produced as part of the Oregon Rises Above Hate coalition and made possible by a generous contribution by Anne Naito-Campbell.



    To learn more please visit oregonrisesabovehate.com. For more stories, visit theimmigrantstory.org/manyroads, listen live at prp.fm, or stream us wherever you get your podcasts.



     

    • 35 min
    Living In a Gilded Cage

    Living In a Gilded Cage

    In the early 1900s, Rani Bagai’s grandparents arrived in California ready to start a new life. But citizenship requirements and prejudice against   Indian-Americans made settling in more difficult. In this conversation, historian Johanna Ogden speaks with Rani about her grandparents’ fraught immigration history, anti-colonial movements on the American West Coast, and how the goalposts for American citizenship in the 20th century kept getting moved. Jo is an independent historian who focuses on South Asian history in Oregon, especially the formation of the Ghadar party. These two women talked in June 2021 at the Japanese American Museum of Oregon.



    For sensitive listeners, please be warned that this episode contains mentions of suicide.



    Many Roads to Here is a production of The Immigrant Story. Many thanks to Rani Bagai and Johanna Ogden for their time and wisdom, and to the Japanese American Museum of Oregon for allowing us to record there. This episode is part of the I Am an American series, generously funded by Anne Naito-Campbell. We also thank South Asian American Digital Archive (SADA) for connecting us with Rani and providing images for this episode.



    This episode was produced by Caitlin Dwyer. Our audio editing was done by Caitlin Dwyer, assisted by Gregg Palmer. Music was composed by Corey Larkin. Our executive producer is Sankar Raman.



    For more stories, visit theimmigrantstory.org/manyroads, listen live at prp.fm, or stream us wherever you get your podcasts.

    • 36 min
    Opera Was Never on the Radar

    Opera Was Never on the Radar

    Growing up in the bohemian beach town of Encinitas, near San Diego, California, Priti Gandhi showed early interest in music and performance.  But she was a first born child in an Indian immigrant family that placed high value on job security, so a career in the arts was not even a consideration. In college, Priti signed up for voice lessons to counter the demands of her journalism courses. The moment her voice instructor introduced her to opera, her path in life changed.



    Many Roads to Here is a production of The Immigrant Story. This episode was produced and edited by Elayna Yussen with sound design by Rick March and post production by Greg Palmer. The original interview was conducted by our Executive producer, Sankar Raman.



    Thank you to Priti Gandhi for providing the live opera music you hear in this episode and to St. Andrew Lutheran Church in Beaverton for the use of their space to record the interview.



    This episode is a part of a series exploring the stories and experiences of Asian Americans in a climate of Anti-Asian rhetoric and increasing violence. It is produced as part of the Oregon Rises Above Hate coalition and made possible by a generous contribution by Anne Naito-Campbell. 



    To learn more about the Oregon Rises Above Hate Coalition, please visit https://oregonrisesabovehate.com.



    For more stories, visit theimmigrantstory.org/manyroads, listen live at prp.fm, or stream us wherever you get your podcasts.

    • 24 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
21 Ratings

21 Ratings

Ga ga2 ,

Invaluable

This is an outstanding podcast series, bringing insight and awareness to the experiences of immigrants who face unimaginable challenges and often incredible danger to journey to the US. Here they become our neighbors, friends, and community leaders— they become our fellow Americans. In their own words, they bring their stories and their humanity. Thanks to
all the volunteers who work in the podcast to illuminate their invaluable stories.

Gary Larkin / Oct 3, 2021

Mrs. Fosse ,

Extraordinary and harrowing

Immigrants are the best of us. This podcast serves them so well. Courageous, inspiring stories that help you understand the strength of character it takes to uproot yourself and head towards a dream (but not a promise) of a better life. Highly recommend!

eecj_queen ,

Beautiful Human Stories

My grandfather believed that world peace could be achieved through travel — which would allow people to see the ways we are all connected and all special. This podcast has given me the opportunity to virtually meet some incredible people in my community who are from all over the world. We often talk about immigration in a collective sense, but these stories offer valuable richness and detail to that topic. I’m grateful to the interviewees and to The Immigrant Story for doing this work.

You Might Also Like

The Moth
NPR
The New York Times
NPR
Symphony Space
WNYC Studios and The New Yorker