14 episodes

Many Roads to Here brings the voices of immigrants, refugees, and asylum seekers to a national conversation about migration and identity. With a myriad of reasons to leave their countries and multitude of ways to arrive in the U.S, Many Roads to Here tells the journeys of immigrants in their own voice. Their stories are our stories.



Since 2017, The Immigrant Story’s mission was simple: share stories to foster empathy and build a more inclusive community. After three years of conducting interviews, writing stories and putting on exhibitions about immigrants and their journeys to the United States, volunteers at the Portland, Oregon-based storytelling nonprofit, had an idea to help further their mission: take audio from interviews conducted for The Immigrant Story and create a podcast series that highlights the voices of individual immigrants. Each episode features one immigrant’s story of the journey that led them to the U.S. Many Roads to Here highlights the various criss-crossing paths they each have taken to America. While each episode of Many Roads to Here is unique, each story connects to recurring themes related to migration such as identity, trauma, loneliness and assimilation. These stories needed to be shared, to showcase what our country is made of, who we are and what makes us great.



Produced by a group of coast-to-coast volunteers, Many Roads to Here utilizes the power of storytelling as immigrants share their hopes, resilience, courage and love.

Many Roads to Here The Immigrant Story

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 20 Ratings

Many Roads to Here brings the voices of immigrants, refugees, and asylum seekers to a national conversation about migration and identity. With a myriad of reasons to leave their countries and multitude of ways to arrive in the U.S, Many Roads to Here tells the journeys of immigrants in their own voice. Their stories are our stories.



Since 2017, The Immigrant Story’s mission was simple: share stories to foster empathy and build a more inclusive community. After three years of conducting interviews, writing stories and putting on exhibitions about immigrants and their journeys to the United States, volunteers at the Portland, Oregon-based storytelling nonprofit, had an idea to help further their mission: take audio from interviews conducted for The Immigrant Story and create a podcast series that highlights the voices of individual immigrants. Each episode features one immigrant’s story of the journey that led them to the U.S. Many Roads to Here highlights the various criss-crossing paths they each have taken to America. While each episode of Many Roads to Here is unique, each story connects to recurring themes related to migration such as identity, trauma, loneliness and assimilation. These stories needed to be shared, to showcase what our country is made of, who we are and what makes us great.



Produced by a group of coast-to-coast volunteers, Many Roads to Here utilizes the power of storytelling as immigrants share their hopes, resilience, courage and love.

    We Need a Willed Remembering

    We Need a Willed Remembering

    Welcome to Many Roads In Conversation, where we look deeply at issues affecting communities within the United States. This inaugural series focuses on the roots  of anti-Asian violence. Joining us for the second episode are Peggy Nagae and Chris Ling, who talk about major civil rights cases and legislation in American history.



    In this episode, we will hear two voices in dialogue, talking through major cases in the Supreme Court and how legislation has affected Asian-American civil rights, including Executive Order 9066, which incarcerated Japanese Americans during World War II.



    In Conversation today are Peggy Nagae and Chris Ling. Both worked as attorneys and have been active in diversity, equity and inclusion work in the Oregon legal community. Peggy is the owner and principal of Peggy Nagae consulting. Chris is now a software engineer. They spoke at the Japanese American Museum of Oregon in May 2021, in front of the actual jail cell that once held lawyer and civil rights advocate Min Yasui — you’ll hear a lot more about Min during their conversation.



    This episode was produced by Caitlin Dwyer. Our audio editing was done by Rick March, assisted by Gordon Graham. Music was composed by Corey Larkin. Our executive producer is Sankar Raman.



    This is our last episode of season 1, so if you’ve been keeping up with us all season, thank you. We’re so excited to have you along for our first year of storytelling. We’ll be back in October 2021 with Season 2, which starts off with a big story, a two-parter co-told by married Holocaust survivors. It’s an epic story of survival and endurance. If you’re in the Portland area you can listen to the series on prp.fm on two consecutive Sunday afternoons, October 3 and 10th at 4pm, or stream us asynchronously wherever you get your podcasts.



    This episode is produced as part of the Oregon Rises Above Hate coalition based in Portland, Oregon and made possible by a generous contribution by Anne Naito-Campbell.

    • 36 min
    A Modern Odyssey

    A Modern Odyssey

    Farzad Larki was born in Iran prior to the Revolution. He grew up in a comfortable middle class family, but when the Shah was overthrown, everything changed.  Between 1979 and 1996, Farzad, his parents, and his siblings all emigrated to the U.S., though each family member traveled a very different path. Farzad’s journey was the longest. From Southern Iran to Portland, Oregon, Farzad’s voyage spanned eleven years and six countries. He traveled by foot, donkey, car, and plane. There were many opportunities to stop along the way, but he had his sights set on the U.S. and the freedom that it represented.



    Many Roads to Here is a production of The Immigrant Story, in collaboration with Portland Radio Project. This episode was produced by Stephanie Vallance. Our audio editing was superbly done by Rick March, assisted by Gordon Graham. Roger Porter conducted the original interview.  Our executive producer is Sankar Raman.



    Many Roads to Here is expanding. We’re looking for radio producers, especially those from immigrant communities and communities of color, to join our team. We’re all-volunteer for now, but we’ve got dreams. Please email mrh@theimmigrantstory.org for more information.



    For more stories, visit theimmigrantstory.org/manyroads, listen live at prp.fm, or stream us wherever you get your podcasts.

    • 28 min
    The Hard Way is What Saves You

    The Hard Way is What Saves You

    In middle school, Yamini Rajan dealt with bullying, isolation, and a sick parent. Her mental health suffered, and destructive habits and self-harm nearly ended her life.  As she healed, she committed to telling others about her story. Now Yamini helps start conversations about mental health in immigrant communities. A note to listeners: this episode contains references to suicide and self-harm.



    Many Roads to Here is a production of The Immigrant Story, in collaboration with Portland Radio Project. This episode was produced by Caitlin Dwyer. Monica Salazar conducted the original interview in Winter 2019. Our audio editing was done by Rick March and Kent Randles, assisted by Gordon Graham. Music was composed by Denzel Mendoza. Our executive producer is Sankar Raman.



    If you’re suffering from depression or having thoughts of self-harm, get help. Call 1-800-273-8255, or text the Crisis Line (you can text HELLO to 741741). Both services are free and available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Someone is there to help.

    • 18 min
    Yes, I am a Rohingya

    Yes, I am a Rohingya

    Reza Uddin was born in the epicenter of the Burmese government’s ethnic cleansing campaign against Rohingya Muslims. For the first years of his life,  Reza wasn’t aware of the institutionalized discrimination against the Rohingya. And then, when Reza was in high school, the Burmese government began denying citizenship to its Rohingya population. When he graduated college, Reza’s father gave him a piece of advice: leave Burma, and don’t come back. 



    The Rohingya refugee crisis is ongoing. There are a number of groups working in the refugee camps that accept donations, including BRAC, Action Against Hunger, and the UN refugee agency. You can donate to Reza’s organization at http://friendsofrohingya.org/ 



    Many Roads to Here is a production of The Immigrant Story, in collaboration with Portland Radio Project. This episode was produced by Allison Merkel. 



    Audio editing was done by Kent Randles, assisted by Gordon Graham. Our executive producer is Sankar Raman.



    For more episodes, https://theimmigrantstory.org/category/episode/ or subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

    • 18 min
    I’m From Here, Where Are You From?

    I’m From Here, Where Are You From?

    It took Dr. Elizabeth Flores through high school, college, and medical school to really understand herself. Born in America, raised in Mexico,  her identity is wrapped up in both places. As it turned out, the physical United States was never her final destination.



    Many Roads to Here is a production of The Immigrant Story, in collaboration with Portland Radio Project. This episode was written by Stephanie Vallance and Emily Denny. Our audio editing was done by Kent Randles, assisted by Gordon Graham. The original interview was conducted in Winter 2020 by Britany Cano-Briceno. Our executive producer is Sankar Raman.



    Many Roads to Here is expanding. We’re looking for radio producers, especially those from immigrant communities and communities of color, to join our team. We’re all-volunteer for now, but we’ve got dreams. Please email mrh@theimmigrantstory.org for more information.



    For more stories, visit theimmigrantstory.org/manyroads, listen live at prp.fm, or stream us wherever you get your podcasts.

    • 24 min
    The Silence is Really Loud for Me

    The Silence is Really Loud for Me

    Introducing Many Roads in Conversation, where we look deeply at issues affecting ethnic and migrant communities within the United States.  This inaugural three-part series will focus on the roots of anti-Asian violence. Joining us for the first episode of the series are Jennifer Fang, director of education at the Japanese American museum of Oregon, and Eliza Canty-Jones, editor of the Oregon Historical Quarterly. In this conversation, they talk through the issues raised by recent hate crimes against Asian-Americans, including historical restrictions on Asian immigration and how modern liberation movements might address acts of hate.



    Many Roads to Here is a production of The Immigrant Story, in collaboration with Portland Radio Project. Many thanks to Jennifer Fang and Eliza Canty-Jones for agreeing to have this important and timely conversation, and for letting us eavesdrop on it.



    This episode was produced by Caitlin Dwyer. Our audio editing was done by Rick March, assisted by Gordon Graham. Music was composed by Corey Larkin. Our executive producer is Sankar Raman.



    This episode is produced as part of the Oregon Rises Above Hate coalition based in Portland, Oregon and made possible by a generous contribution by Anne Naito-Campbell.

    • 31 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
20 Ratings

20 Ratings

Ga ga2 ,

Invaluable

This is an outstanding podcast series, bringing insight and awareness to the experiences of immigrants who face unimaginable challenges and often incredible danger to journey to the US. Here they become our neighbors, friends, and community leaders— they become our fellow Americans. In their own words, they bring their stories and their humanity. Thanks to
all the volunteers who work in the podcast to illuminate their invaluable stories.

Gary Larkin / Oct 3, 2021

Mrs. Fosse ,

Extraordinary and harrowing

Immigrants are the best of us. This podcast serves them so well. Courageous, inspiring stories that help you understand the strength of character it takes to uproot yourself and head towards a dream (but not a promise) of a better life. Highly recommend!

eecj_queen ,

Beautiful Human Stories

My grandfather believed that world peace could be achieved through travel — which would allow people to see the ways we are all connected and all special. This podcast has given me the opportunity to virtually meet some incredible people in my community who are from all over the world. We often talk about immigration in a collective sense, but these stories offer valuable richness and detail to that topic. I’m grateful to the interviewees and to The Immigrant Story for doing this work.

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