22 episodes

We launch this Podcast with Columbus’ arrival to the “New World.” This event issued forth the “Age of Discovery.” Although we were taught Columbus was in search of spices, he was actually sailing under 15th century Papal edicts known as the Doctrines of Christian Discovery [DOCD]. Following the fall of Constantinople, these Papal Bulls were issued to legitimate Portugal’s exploits in extracting gold in West Africa and capturing slaves. By 1492, the Transatlantic slave trade began with Columbus’ first crossing. The DOCD established the spiritual justification to bring the world under total dominion of the Church. The patriarchal hierarchy was constituted under an Almighty Supreme God at the helm—thus giving the Church full access to the world’s resources, by having dominion over Indigenous Peoples, their lands, and destruction of their cultures. These Christian decrees soon became the legal principal used during the Protestant Reformation, by giving credence to any Protestant claim to Indigenous lands in the Americas. By 1823, the DOCD was codified into US property law by the Supreme Court in Johnson v M’Intosh. As recently as 2005, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg upheld the DOCD in her written majority opinion against the Oneida in; City of Sherrill v Oneida Nation. Following 15th century Christian imperialism, through to the 19th century formulation of US law, we are able to identify today, how the DOCD continues to be utilized all over the world by multi-national corporations. Corporations who continue to justify resource extraction through the seizure and destruction of Indigenous lands, and who perpetrate cultural genocide through the 15th century fiction of “terra nullius”—empty land, and under the guise of economic development. The goal of this Podcast is to help identify these systems of domination that have been sustained by greed and power, through the subjugation of human beings and the natural world. https://podcast.doctrineofdiscovery.org/

Mapping the Doctrine of Discovery The Doctrine of Discovery Project

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 4.9 • 15 Ratings

We launch this Podcast with Columbus’ arrival to the “New World.” This event issued forth the “Age of Discovery.” Although we were taught Columbus was in search of spices, he was actually sailing under 15th century Papal edicts known as the Doctrines of Christian Discovery [DOCD]. Following the fall of Constantinople, these Papal Bulls were issued to legitimate Portugal’s exploits in extracting gold in West Africa and capturing slaves. By 1492, the Transatlantic slave trade began with Columbus’ first crossing. The DOCD established the spiritual justification to bring the world under total dominion of the Church. The patriarchal hierarchy was constituted under an Almighty Supreme God at the helm—thus giving the Church full access to the world’s resources, by having dominion over Indigenous Peoples, their lands, and destruction of their cultures. These Christian decrees soon became the legal principal used during the Protestant Reformation, by giving credence to any Protestant claim to Indigenous lands in the Americas. By 1823, the DOCD was codified into US property law by the Supreme Court in Johnson v M’Intosh. As recently as 2005, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg upheld the DOCD in her written majority opinion against the Oneida in; City of Sherrill v Oneida Nation. Following 15th century Christian imperialism, through to the 19th century formulation of US law, we are able to identify today, how the DOCD continues to be utilized all over the world by multi-national corporations. Corporations who continue to justify resource extraction through the seizure and destruction of Indigenous lands, and who perpetrate cultural genocide through the 15th century fiction of “terra nullius”—empty land, and under the guise of economic development. The goal of this Podcast is to help identify these systems of domination that have been sustained by greed and power, through the subjugation of human beings and the natural world. https://podcast.doctrineofdiscovery.org/

    S04E02: Exploring the American Religious Tapestry: From Civil Religion to Secularism and the Impact of the January 6th Insurrection

    S04E02: Exploring the American Religious Tapestry: From Civil Religion to Secularism and the Impact of the January 6th Insurrection

    Embark on a profound journey through the tapestry of American religious history with Joel Harrison, associate professor of religion, and his sharp students, Jason Armstrong and Christian Oppenhagen. Together, we unravel the complex narratives of civil religion and secularism, with a particular lens on the interplay of race and religion since the colonial era. Our conversation pivots around Joel's innovative teaching methods, as he leverages the January 6th insurrection as a vivid case study in his Religion 100 course at Northern Virginia Community College, engaging students with the pressing relevance of historical events in shaping today's religious and political landscapes.

    Witness firsthand the transformative power of academic discourse as it escapes the confines of lecture halls and influences the broader world. The Doctrine of Discovery conference epitomizes scholarship's potency in initiating societal reflection and change, a revelation deeply felt by attendees like Jason. The connections forged among participants of various backgrounds underscore the role of academia in facilitating a collective confrontation with our intricate historical legacies. These moments serve as catalysts for personal growth and cultural respect, sparking an appreciation for the diverse tapestry that is our shared human experience.

    Finally, we navigate the profound relationship between land, heritage, and identity, acknowledging the stark repercussions of European conquest on indigenous communities. Chris shares his enlightening experiences from the conference, inspiring a broader discussion on the primacy of land identity within indigenous culture and the importance of understanding our ancestral ties. Through this revelation, we are reminded of the enduring significance of our roots and the narrative of who we are, ensuring the past is not merely history—but a compass that guides our ongoing quest for understanding and empathy.
    Support the showView the transcript and show notes at podcast.doctrineofdiscovery.org. Learn more about the Doctrine of Discovery on our site DoctrineofDiscovery.org.

    • 53 min
    Unearthing the Foundations: Examining Native American Legal Battles and the Doctrine of Discovery

    Unearthing the Foundations: Examining Native American Legal Battles and the Doctrine of Discovery

    Discover the overlooked truths of Native American legal struggles and examine the enduring impact of the Doctrine of Discovery with our esteemed guests Peter d'Errico, Steven T. Newcomb, and Joseph J. Heath. This episode promises to enhance your understanding of Native American representation in law and the historical decisions that shape their rights today. Prepare to have your perspective on federal anti-Indian law and the ramifications of the Marshall Trilogy thoroughly expanded by our panel's wealth of expertise.

    Our conversation navigates the powerful role language plays in framing indigenous existence against the backdrop of colonization and Western narratives. We dissect the intentional metaphors by historical figures to assert control and critique the mainstream media's failure to challenge the systemic dominations at play. This episode is a clarion call for awareness, urging a collective shift towards acknowledging the historical and spiritual significance of land to Indigenous peoples, and their ongoing efforts to heal and decolonize.

    Toward the close, we scrutinize the landmark McGirt decision and its effects on indigenous land rights, noting the absence of "plenary power" in Justice Gorsuch's opinion. The discussion points to the embedded racism and religious supremacy in the Lone Wolf decision of 1903, echoing Justice Clarence Thomas's skepticism of US sovereignty over Native lands. We cap off our exploration by delving into the implications of US citizenship on indigenous identity and the potential empowerment through citizenship of an Indian nation. Join us for a thought-provoking journey through the intricate intersection of law, sovereignty, and identity within Native American communities.

    ***
    This panel was recorded at the The Religious Origins of White Supremacy: Johnson v. M'Intosh and the Doctrine of Christian Discovery conference.
    Support the showView the transcript and show notes at podcast.doctrineofdiscovery.org. Learn more about the Doctrine of Discovery on our site DoctrineofDiscovery.org.

    • 1 hr
    S03E06: Exploring the Cultural, Historical, and Culinary Significance of Chilis with Victor Valle

    S03E06: Exploring the Cultural, Historical, and Culinary Significance of Chilis with Victor Valle

    Ready to put your culinary curiosity to the test? Brace yourself as we journey through a world where fire and chili are more than just ingredients; they're centuries-old metaphors that have shaped cultural identities. We're joined by our distinguished guest, Victor Valle, the mind behind "The Poetics of Fire: Metaphors of Chili Eating in the Borderlands," to give you a taste of the aesthetics of Mexican cuisine, the metaphors that shape it, and its intriguing genesis.

    Join us as we go beyond the borderlands and into the heart of Mesoamerican medicine, the doctrine of discovery, chili domestication, and how all of these elements intertwine to create a beautiful and thought-provoking narrative. We peel back layers of history, revealing the transformative power of chili from its humble beginnings in the mountains of Mixtec and Zapotec to its place on your dinner table today. Tune in as we explore the complex relationship between land, culture, and violence and why chili, a simple ingredient, became a symbol of struggle and identity.

    But that's not all! We also tap into the world of journalism, activism, and immigration, as seen through the eyes of a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist. We discuss the role of borders in shaping labor prices, the power of journalism in exposing societal issues, and the lasting impact of the Chicano movement. As we wrap things up, we'll take you behind the scenes of our podcast, providing you with a glimpse of the partnerships that make our conversations possible. So, buckle up for an enlightening journey that redefines how you see culture, cuisine, and chili.
    Support the showView the transcript and show notes at podcast.doctrineofdiscovery.org. Learn more about the Doctrine of Discovery on our site DoctrineofDiscovery.org.

    • 1 hr 25 min
    S03E05: Land is Kin: Indigenous Rights and Sovereignty with Dana Lloyd

    S03E05: Land is Kin: Indigenous Rights and Sovereignty with Dana Lloyd

    Have you ever wondered what it truly means for land to be sacred? Join us on a thought-provoking exploration with Dr. Dana Lloyd, author of "Land is Kin: Sovereignty, Religious Freedom, and Indigenous Sacred Sites." A Tel Aviv native raised on Palestinian land, Dr. Lloyd brings an exceptional perspective to draw parallels between the settler colonial contexts of Israel-Palestine and the United States. We dive into the intricate concept of land as sacred, the enduring struggle for indigenous rights, and the pivotal Ling case's profound impact on indigenous and settler law.

    As we navigate this engrossing journey, the intersection of environmentalism and indigenous rights comes to light, specifically through the lens of the concept of wilderness. Prepare to challenge your perceptions as we compare the indigenous perspective of land as a gift of life with the colonizers' view of domination and extraction. The conversation deepens as we explore the tension between indigenous sovereignty, religion, and property law - a tension which unravels throughout history and contemporary court cases alike, including the case of Ling.

    The final part of our discussion welcomes a member of the Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania, who shares the compelling story of colonization on Lenape land and unpacks the rigors of the doctrine of discovery. We tackle the complex realities of genocide, settler colonialism, and indigenous sovereignty that echo in Native American history and current struggles. With a deeper understanding of these complexities, we hope to inspire listeners to further engage with the narrative of indigenous rights and sovereignty.
    Support the showView the transcript and show notes at podcast.doctrineofdiscovery.org. Learn more about the Doctrine of Discovery on our site DoctrineofDiscovery.org.

    • 55 min
    S03E04: Beekeeping, Mushrooms and Sculptures: A Glimpse into Traditional Lithuanian Life

    S03E04: Beekeeping, Mushrooms and Sculptures: A Glimpse into Traditional Lithuanian Life

    Ever wondered how the Baltic region's indigenous religious traditions have evolved over the centuries? Join us in conversation with our esteemed guest, Eglute Trinkauskaite, a faculty member at Maryland Institute College of Art, who offers a deep dive into the rich history and culture of post-Soviet Lithuania. Eglute's extensive studies illuminate the primary sources of Baltic religion, unmasking the true meaning of "paganism" and taking us on a fascinating journey from the age-old oral traditions to the Christianization process that shook the region's matrilineal societies.

    Our exploration doesn't stop there; we weave through Lithuania's unique mushroom and bee traditions, revealing the spiritual aspects that remain engrained in the country's psyche. Agluta shares personal experiences from her grandfather's beekeeping tradition and the unique wooden sculptures of Jesus, known locally as Rupin Torielos. The conversation takes a nostalgic turn as we discover the intimate connection between these traditions and pre-colonial relatives, creating a vivid picture. 

    Lastly, we grapple with the impact and potential repercussions of our Indigenous Culture Seminar presentation to the local Lithuanian community. We reflect on the resurgence of religious traditions since Lithuania's independence in 1991, and the challenges it faces in the modern era. This episode, packed with insights and revelations, explores ancient Baltic religion, its history, and its influence on today's Lithuania. Join us for this enlightening journey, and discover a different world that has stood the test of time.


    Support the showView the transcript and show notes at podcast.doctrineofdiscovery.org. Learn more about the Doctrine of Discovery on our site DoctrineofDiscovery.org.

    • 56 min
    S03E03: Indigenous Advocacy and Climate Change: A Conversation with Evie Reyes-Aguirre

    S03E03: Indigenous Advocacy and Climate Change: A Conversation with Evie Reyes-Aguirre

    Today we're privileged to converse with Eve Reyes-Aguirre, an Izkaloteka Azteca Indigenous woman, who has passionately dedicated over 25 years of her life advocating for human rights, women's rights, Indigenous peoples rights, and environmental rights. Eve, a fervent advocate, has a wealth of experience from her time at Tonotierra, an embassy for Indigenous peoples, which she shares with us. She also provides us with a deeper understanding of the Doctrine of Discovery while explaining Tonatierra's mission to dismantle its harmful effects.

    Eve takes us through her experiences as she navigates the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, sharing strategies with Indigenous nations globally. With her first-hand experience, she elucidates the impact of forced displacement on Indigenous peoples and the lingering trauma of colonialism. She brings to light the grassroots advocacy work by Tonatierra in Arizona, which extends to assisting Indigenous farm workers and championing for Indigenous food sovereignty.

    As we wrap up our enlightening conversation, Eve shares profound insights on the influence of settler colonialism on both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people. She underscores the importance of understanding false climate solutions that only serve to displace Indigenous peoples further. Eve leaves us with an understanding of our spiritual connection to the land and how this connection can inform our collective fight against climate change. This engaging conversation is not to be missed, as it sheds light on Indigenous advocacy, identity, and climate change in a manner never before heard.

    We dedicate this episode to the memory of our dear friend and founder of Tonaiterra, Tupak Huehuecoyotl (Tupac Enrique Acosta) who has recently joined the ancestors.


    Support the showView the transcript and show notes at podcast.doctrineofdiscovery.org. Learn more about the Doctrine of Discovery on our site DoctrineofDiscovery.org.

    • 51 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
15 Ratings

15 Ratings

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