7 episodes

The Martin’s Act at 200 radio documentary is a collaborative endeavor between Martin Rowe and the Culture & Animals Foundation and the writer Alex Lockwood. Episodes 1-3 were produced by Ryan Rhodes, with the voice talent of Ryan Rhodes, Ben Hunt, Sharon Eckman, EvaMarie Lindahl, Daneet Steffens, and Richard Martin MP dramatized by the one and only Peter Egan.
Our ambition in marking the bicentenary of Martin’s Act is to chart its history and legacy, and to generate new thinking and debate on the future of human–animal relations especially in regard to animals and the law. Join us as we speak to artists, activists, academics and others in charting a new path toward our just and sustainable future.

Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Martin's Act at 200 Alex Lockwood

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

The Martin’s Act at 200 radio documentary is a collaborative endeavor between Martin Rowe and the Culture & Animals Foundation and the writer Alex Lockwood. Episodes 1-3 were produced by Ryan Rhodes, with the voice talent of Ryan Rhodes, Ben Hunt, Sharon Eckman, EvaMarie Lindahl, Daneet Steffens, and Richard Martin MP dramatized by the one and only Peter Egan.
Our ambition in marking the bicentenary of Martin’s Act is to chart its history and legacy, and to generate new thinking and debate on the future of human–animal relations especially in regard to animals and the law. Join us as we speak to artists, activists, academics and others in charting a new path toward our just and sustainable future.

Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Episode 1: Origins

    Episode 1: Origins

    Richard “Humanity Dick” Martin (left) was both a man of his times, and an exception to it. In this episode, we find out how this distinctive personality—impetuous, generous, dogged, and pugnacious—pursued his causes, both in parliament and outside it. We learn of the context of his life: the revolutions in France and the United States; the emancipation of Catholics and the Act of Union, which saw Ireland joined politically with the rest of Great Britain; and the reformist movements and shifts in relationships with other animals that marked the era. We also explore the blindspots and assumptions that were to mark animal advocacy for two centuries.
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    • 31 min
    Episode 2: Passage of Martin's Act

    Episode 2: Passage of Martin's Act

    Richard Martin was not the only parliamentarian with a passion for animal welfare. In this episode, we meet two more: Sir William Pulteney, who brought a bill against bull-baiting by dogs to the UK parliament two decades before Martin’s Act, and the charismatic orator Thomas, Lord Erskine. We delve deeper into Erskine’s convictions, and unpack the speech he made to parliamentarians in 1809—words and ideas that ring as true today as two centuries ago.
    We follow the contentious debates leading to the introduction of Martin’s Act, and its close call in 1821, which sent Martin, Erskine, and their supporters back to the drawing board. And we hear about the dramatic parliamentary maneuvers required to finally get Martin’s Act passed.

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    • 24 min
    Episode 3: Immediate Impacts

    Episode 3: Immediate Impacts

    A piece of legislation is only as good as its enforcement, and, with no police force yet to call upon, Richard Martin characteristically took it upon himself to arrest individuals, prosecute them, and then take them to prison. In that first year, sixty-three court cases of animal abuse were brought, including by Richard Martin himself.
    The establishment of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) would also have immediate consequences. This episode explores some of them: the founding of SPCAs around the world, including in the United States, under the auspices of Henry Bergh, whom we meet in this episode; the creation of Battersea Dogs Home in 1860; and the failure of the Cruelty Act of 1860. We also meet the personalities who were to found the SPCA—including the Rev. Arthur Broome, and, in particular, Lewis Gompertz, who was not only the only Jew among the SPCA’s Christian founders but the sole vegan.
    We also look at the Pease Act of 1835 and subsequent pieces of legislation for animals through the nineteenth century, tracking the legacy of Martin’s Act and the development of sentiment for animals both public and private before the death of great animal supporter Queen Victoria, in 1901. Along the way, we’re introduced to two giants of the era: Henry Bergh, founder of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals; and Frances Power Cobbe, who brought public attention to the issue of vivisection (live experimentation) of animals in laboratories.

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    • 39 min
    Episode 4: Dogs and Monsters

    Episode 4: Dogs and Monsters

    In this episode, we explore interrelated strands that connect the animal activism of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We learn about the “monstrous veganism” of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818) with scholar Emelia Quinn; we explore the radical Quaker vision of Donald Watson, the co-founder of the Vegan Society (1944) with Kate Stewart and Matthew Cole. With novelist Paula Owen we enter the world of antivivisectionists Lizzy Linda af Hageby and Liesa Schartau in the “Little Brown Dog” riots of the early 1900s; and Tony Milligan tells us about the tragic story of Laika, who in 1957 became the first animal in space.
    The threads that weave the centuries together are the power of memorials both to affirm the hero and to stir unrest; the effects of war on animal advocacy; and the century-long challenges between attempting to moderate institutional cruelty and indifference and espousing a more radical vision of social change, veganism, and ending animal exploitation.


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    • 40 min
    Episode 5: Twenty Years of Change: 1962–1982

    Episode 5: Twenty Years of Change: 1962–1982

    The early 1960s and 1970s saw a major shift in environmental consciousness and animal awareness, led by pioneering women—and in this episode we profile them all. The first was Rachel Carson, whose book Silent Spring (1963) helped launch the modern environmental movement. The second was the Quaker Ruth Harrison, whose book Animal Machines (1964) was the first work to expose factory farming, and, tellingly, for which Rachel Carson wrote the foreword.
    The third was the novelist Brigid Brophy, whose op-ed in the London Times first introduced the phrase “animal rights,” and who argued for the moral consideration of fishes. The fourth was the philosopher Roslind Godlovitch, who first alerted utilitarian Peter Singer to Harrison’s book, which changed the trajectory of his thinking about animals, and who herself, with Singer, the co-founder of the Oxford Group of philosophers, who galvanized thinking about animals in the 1970s and 1980s.
    The fifth was Carol J. Adams, who conceived the ideas that would form her groundbreaking The Sexual Politics of Meat (1989) while taking classes from the radical feminist theologian Mary Daly in 1974. In these episodes, we meet these women—whose collaborative and brilliant work has been so often overlooked in the history of animal advocacy since 1960. We’ll also hear from lawyer and writer Jim Mason, who toured American factory farms with Peter Singer as research for Animal Liberation (1975) and Animal Factories (1980). And we’ll hear from a hungry otter, too.

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    • 47 min
    Episode 6: From Past To Future

    Episode 6: From Past To Future

    The passage of Martin’s Act both expanded and delimited the interests and rights of nonhuman animals. It sanctioned—that ambiguous word that means both “to forbid” and “to allow”—(some) cruelty against (some) animals by (some) people. So, what legal, political, and social lessons can we take from its passage? That legislative wins are difficult, time-consuming, and often limited by the system; that collaboration across areas of expertise is key; and that enforcement is as much an issue as the law itself.
    We also look to the future: thinking about what is missing, and how we can create a just, inclusive, safe and effective animal movement as the model for the society we want to live in by (at least!) 2050. Listen to insights and opinion from Mariann Sullivan, Anita Krajnc, Paula Sparks, Maneesha Deckha, Tony Milligan, Bernard Unti, Richard Ryder and Jane Tredgett in this final episode of the series.

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    • 1 hr 1 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
2 Ratings

2 Ratings

Paul6 ,

Cool podcast

Really glad to have this podcast about such important animal protection history.

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