165 episodes

A scholarly podcast about pop culture hosted by Hannah McGregor and Marcelle Kosman, produced by Witch, Please Productions.
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Material Girls Witch, Please Productions

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.8 • 999 Ratings

A scholarly podcast about pop culture hosted by Hannah McGregor and Marcelle Kosman, produced by Witch, Please Productions.
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Sweet Potato Fries x Food Imperialism

    Sweet Potato Fries x Food Imperialism

    Remember about fifteen years ago when we all went a little nuts for sweet potato fries? What was going on there? Well it turns out, that beloved appetizer was more than a tasty treat circa 2007. In this episode, Marcelle leads Hannah through research about the “orange-flesh sweetpotato” and its relationship to GMOs, cash crops, fat phobia and food imperialism. She pulls on the work of Joe Kobuthi for an analysis of food systems that informs her understanding of the sweet potato's zeitgeist-y moment.and she ends with a thesis that's got quite a bite to it.
    We'll be back in two weeks for another episode, but until then, be sure to check out all the bonus content we have on our Patreon at Patreon.com/ohwitchplease. You can learn more about the show at ohwitchplease.ca and on our instagram at instagram.com/ohwitchplease! Want more from us? Check out our website ohwitchplease.ca.
    ***
    Material Girls is a show that aims to make sense of the zeitgeist through materialist critique* and critical theory! Each episode looks at a unique object of study (something popular now or from back in the day) and over the course of three distinct segments, Hannah and Marcelle apply their academic expertise to the topic at hand.

    *Materialist Critique is, at its simplest possible level, a form of cultural critique – that is, scholarly engagement with a cultural text of some kind – that is interested in modes of production, moments of reception, and the historical and ideological contexts for both. Materialist critique is really interested in the question of why a particular cultural work or practice emerged at a particular moment.
    Music Credits:
    “Shopping Mall”: by Jay Arner and Jessica Delisle ©2020
    Used by permission. All rights reserved. As recorded by Auto Syndicate on the album “Bongo Dance”.

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Dungeons and Dragons x Ludology

    Dungeons and Dragons x Ludology

    Do you play D&D? Do you have a friend who does, but you don't totally *get* what it is? Did you see the recent film Dungeons and Dragons: Honor Among Thieves and think "wow, that role playing game went MAINSTREAM!?" Then this episode is sure to satisfy your curiosity about this zeitgeisty game! Hannah, who herself plays D&D, leads Marcelle through a history of the tabletop role-playing game created by Dave Arneson and Gary Gygax, tracing its origins all the way to Dungeons & Dragons 5E (the most recent edition). They then use ludology, the study of games and gaming, to understand the unique role D&D has at the intersection of gaming and narrative. And then, as always, the episode is wrapped up with a beautifully tied together thesis (from Hannah) about the transformation, or rather, realization of the game through the radical acts of people playing it.
    To learn more about the research that went into today's episode, be sure to follow Witch, Please Productions on Substack at https://ohwitchplease.substack.com! And if you like our show, please share it with family and friends! Word-of-mouth is the primary way we reach new listeners who are interested in feminist materialist critique, pop culture and laughing at and from within *the discourse.*
    We'll be back in two weeks for another episode, but until then, be sure to check out all the bonus content we have on our Patreon at Patreon.com/ohwitchplease. You can learn more about the show at ohwitchplease.ca and on our instagram at instagram.com/ohwitchplease! Want more from us? Check out our website ohwitchplease.ca.
    ***
    Material Girls is a show that aims to make sense of the zeitgeist through materialist critique* and critical theory! Each episode looks at a unique object of study (something popular now or from back in the day) and over the course of three distinct segments, Hannah and Marcelle apply their academic expertise to the topic at hand.

    *Materialist Critique is, at its simplest possible level, a form of cultural critique – that is, scholarly engagement with a cultural text of some kind – that is interested in modes of production, moments of reception, and the historical and ideological contexts for both. Materialist critique is really interested in the question of why a particular cultural work or practice emerged at a particular moment.
    Music Credits:
    “Shopping Mall”: by Jay Arner and Jessica Delisle ©2020
    Used by permission. All rights reserved. As recorded by Auto Syndicate on the album “Bongo Dance”.

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 1 hr 11 min
    Material Concerns: Wonka and Twilight Bonus Pt. I

    Material Concerns: Wonka and Twilight Bonus Pt. I

    There was so much more to say about Wonka and Twilight. In Part I of this bonus episode (aka a 'Material Concern' episode), we talk about fatphobia in children's literature, the "representation" of indigeneity in Stephanie Meyer's the Twilight Saga, and so much more. If you enjoy this episode, head over to Patreon.com/ohwitchplease for Part II! The rest of the conversation is available at all our tiers. For just $5 USD/month you'll have access to the rest of this conversation, all the bonus perks we've already released, and Hannah McGregor's new video podcast, Making Worlds.
    And, if you liked this episode, please share it with family and friends! Word-of-mouth is the primary way we reach new listeners who are interested in feminist materialist critique, pop culture and laughing at and from within *the discourse.* Share the show today!
    ***
    Material Girls is a new show that aims to make sense of the zeitgeist through materialist critique* and critical theory! Each episode looks at a unique object of study (something popular now or from back in the day) and over the course of three distinct segments, Hannah and Marcelle apply their academic expertise to the topic at hand.
    We'll be back in one week for a regular episode!
    *Materialist Critique is, at its simplest possible level, a form of cultural critique – that is, scholarly engagement with a cultural text of some kind – that is interested in modes of production, moments of reception, and the historical and ideological contexts for both. Materialist critique is really interested in the question of why a particular cultural work or practice emerged at a particular moment.
    Music Credits:
    “Shopping Mall”: by Jay Arner and Jessica Delisle ©2020
    Used by permission. All rights reserved. As recorded by Auto Syndicate on the album “Bongo Dance”.

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 36 min
    Twilight x Girl Culture with Jackson Bird

    Twilight x Girl Culture with Jackson Bird

    Are you Team Edward or Team Jacob or some secret third option?**
    Marcelle asks this question only at the very end of the episode, and you know why? Because there is so much more to discuss when it comes to Stephanie Meyer's Twilight. And who better to dig into this novel's plot and place in pop culture than Jackson Bird (he/him) who, over fifteen years ago, was a Twi-hard. If you frequent fan spaces, you might know Jackson through his previous work with Harry Potter Alliance or his very popular Youtube channel. Or perhaps you know him from guest spots on the podcast Harry Potter and the Sacred Text, his own (now retired) podcast Transmission, his 2017 Ted Talk (How to Talk and Listen to Transgender People), or his book, Sorted: Growing Up, Coming Out, and Finding My Place. Or maybe he's a new person to you, in which case, you're welcome — he rocks!
    In this conversation, Marcelle, Hannah and Jack discuss what was going on in 2005 that primed Twilight for such wide success. They ask: Why were young readers so hungry for a character like Bella? What does the plot of the novel suggest about the reading appetite of millennial readers coming of age in an era defined by impossible beauty standards and purity politics? When we refuse to disregard the interests, passions and literary preferences of young people, what can we discover about one another, our culture and ourselves?
    To learn more about the research that went into today's episode, be sure to follow Witch, Please Productions on Substack at https://ohwitchplease.substack.com! And if you like our show, please share it with family and friends! Word-of-mouth is the primary way we reach new listeners who are interested in feminist materialist critique, pop culture and laughing at and from within *the discourse.*
    AND, if you want to participate in our Q&A episodes, be sure to follow us on Instagram @ohwitchplease to submit your inquiries!

    **Team Bella!?!

    ***
    Material Girls is a show that aims to make sense of the zeitgeist through materialist critique* and critical theory! Each episode looks at a unique object of study (something popular now or from back in the day) and over the course of three distinct segments, Hannah and Marcelle apply their academic expertise to the topic at hand.
    We'll be back in two weeks for another episode, but until then, be sure to check out all the bonus content we have on our Patreon at Patreon.com/ohwitchplease. You can learn more about the show at ohwitchplease.ca and on our instagram at instagram.com/ohwitchplease! Want more from us? Check out our website ohwitchplease.ca.
    *Materialist Critique is, at its simplest possible level, a form of cultural critique – that is, scholarly engagement with a cultural text of some kind – that is interested in modes of production, moments of reception, and the historical and ideological contexts for both. Materialist critique is really interested in the question of why a particular cultural work or practice emerged at a particular moment.
    Music Credits:
    “Shopping Mall”: by Jay Arner and Jessica Delisle ©2020
    Used by permission. All rights reserved. As recorded by Auto Syndicate on the album “Bongo Dance”.

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Introducing Making Worlds with Hannah McGregor

    Introducing Making Worlds with Hannah McGregor

    We're so excited to announce that our new show, Making Worlds, begins January 25th!
    This video podcast, hosted by Hannah McGregor (maybe you know them?!?), will be released monthly via our Patreon. In each 30ish-minute episode, a guest will bring Hannah a text that has helped them imagine the liberatory possibilities of another world. We’re talking sci-fi, fantasy and speculative fiction! Hot!!!! Our first episode? Why it simply had to be about Our Flag Means Death! What says liberatory possibility more than gay pirates!? And, we're really lucky to have writer Hope Rehak as our first guest. That name sound familiar? Well that's probably because she's kind of beloved on the internet for, among other things, her OFMD content! She's also Coach's sister. :)
    The episodes we’ve recorded so far have been full of passion, enthusiasm, and genuine joy and we can’t wait for you to see them. Audio-only versions will be available on Patreon as well, but you should tune into the video versions if you’re able. Hannah’s makeup is worth it.
    Want to see our logo? Subscribe to our Substack or our Youtube channel. Want to get access to the show? Become a Patreon supporter at patreon.com/ohwitchplease for just $54 USD/year. Have questions about what's going on with our other to-be-launched show Gender Playground? Answers are in the Substack!
    Special thanks to Jay Arner and Jessica Delisle who wrote our theme song!
    Used by permission. All rights reserved.


    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 4 min
    Wonka x Antisemitism and Censorship with Leena Norms

    Wonka x Antisemitism and Censorship with Leena Norms

    In this week's episode, we're joined by the incredible Leena Norms (she/her) to talk about Timothée Chalamet's latest venture: Wonka.
    This holiday blockbuster from director Paul King (Paddington, Paddington 2) made many people on the internet cringe even before it's release in mid December. It was notably in the *discourse* through memes and tweets that suggested Kylie Jenner perhaps got 'the ick' from Timmy's performance. The good news is that Marcelle, Hannah and Leena went to go see the movie opening weekend, so you don't have to! Unless, like Marcelle, you want to see it TWICE.
    In this conversation, Marcelle, Hannah and Leena discuss Netflix's collaboration with the Roald Dahl Story Company (and Taika Waititi's connection!), Dahl's legacy in Britain's cultural imagination, and the lengths studios go to keep his work relevant to new audiences despite the rampant fat phobia and antisemitism within his texts. They talk Noodle, the notable absence of chocolate from the film's marketing, the Jewish writers behind the script, and, of course, Hugh Grant the Oompa Loompa.
    To learn more about the research that went into today's episode, be sure to follow Witch, Please Productions on Substack at https://ohwitchplease.substack.com! And if you like our show, please share it with family and friends! Word-of-mouth is the primary way we reach new listeners who are interested in feminist materialist critique, pop culture and laughing at and from within *the discourse.*
    ***
    Material Girls is a show that aims to make sense of the zeitgeist through materialist critique* and critical theory! Each episode looks at a unique object of study (something popular now or from back in the day) and over the course of three distinct segments, Hannah and Marcelle apply their academic expertise to the topic at hand.
    We'll be back in two weeks for another episode, but until then, be sure to check out all the bonus content we have on our Patreon at Patreon.com/ohwitchplease. You can learn more about the show at ohwitchplease.ca and on our instagram at instagram.com/ohwitchplease! Want more from us? Check out our website ohwitchplease.ca.
    *Materialist Critique is, at its simplest possible level, a form of cultural critique – that is, scholarly engagement with a cultural text of some kind – that is interested in modes of production, moments of reception, and the historical and ideological contexts for both. Materialist critique is really interested in the question of why a particular cultural work or practice emerged at a particular moment.
    Music Credits:
    “Shopping Mall”: by Jay Arner and Jessica Delisle ©2020
    Used by permission. All rights reserved. As recorded by Auto Syndicate on the album “Bongo Dance”.

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 1 hr 7 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
999 Ratings

999 Ratings

Salsera bachatera ,

My favorite podcast

So I teach Spanish and the other day in class we came across the word "somnolencia" and my students are like "what's that mean?" And I go "somnolence" and they're like ok, what's somnolence? And the ONLY thing I could think of in that moment was the phrase "somnolence of the Kendom," which I knew would not help my students understand at all. I said something about Barbie and a podcast and my students go, "Maestra, do you have time for podcasts?" No, I haven't graded your essays yet, but yes, I do have time for my favorite podcast. Thanks to Hannah and Marcelle for being simultaneously the best and worst thing to happen to my pedagogy! Couldn't get through the semester without them.

IlovehowCanadianssayZ.Z.Z.Z. ,

Accessible and Delightful

Both the new iteration as Material Girls and the previous runs of Witch Please have been a delight to listen to this year.

As someone with no background in media theory, they are able to make some big academic ideas much more digestible and relevant to daily life (except maybe the idea of ‘publics'. I don’t think anyone can crack that nut for me.) On top of feeling intellectually enriching, the dynamic of friendship between Hannah and Marcelle and their occasional guests just feels wonderfully wholesome. Nice job you all.

Since I can’t figure out how to contact the show and don’t follow social media, I have a content suggestion for the hosts, in hope that they still read their good reviews (or maybe at least Coach does). For a ‘Why here, why now’ that I’ve been pondering, I think it would be interesting to look at the recent phenomenon of the Lo-Fi beats hip hop musical sub-genre. Its popularity with Millennials and Gen Z seems interesting, especially as it compares and contrasts with another easy listening sub-genre beloved by the Boomer crowd: Smooth Jazz.

Cel from San Fran ,

Great

I thought I was too dumb to listen but after a couple rewinds and start overs .. I have came to understand so many things. The “Omg, now it all makes sense” moments are priceless. You don’t have to be a scholar to enjoy this podcast. Just have to be willing to rewind a few times lol!

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