252 episodes

A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affair‪s‬ Rick Harp

    • News Commentary
    • 5.0 • 96 Ratings

A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

    Opening up a can of controversy: Pt. 1 (ep 252)

    Opening up a can of controversy: Pt. 1 (ep 252)

    It was meant as a gesture in support of Indigenous women. A one of a kind design by an Indigenous artist known for her bold, provocative imagery. But when it comes to her latest work, it’s not what her art shows that’s sparked strife so much as where it’s shown—wrapped around a cold can of beer. Cue the beer can backlash, with some slamming the artist for supposedly glorifying or at least trivializing a substance many blame for violence against and among Indigenous people. This week, the first half of an extended conversation with Chippewa/Potawatomi artist Chief Lady Bird to learn more about the origins of her collaboration with the brewery, the outrage it tapped into, and why this topic can be so touchy to talk about—for us included.
    Also joining host/producer Rick Harp: MI regulars Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment, and Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC.
    // CREDITS: Our theme is ‘nesting’ by birocratic.

    • 52 min
    When rez dogs become settlers' pet projects

    When rez dogs become settlers' pet projects

    Canine colonial. Is it apt to draw parallels between the worst ills of mainstream child welfare systems and those of animal welfare? It’s the potentially provocative thesis of the Vancouver Humane Society, a thesis they soon hope to put into practice.
    Joining host/producer Rick Harp for a decolonial discussion on dogs on and off the rez are MI regulars Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, and Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment.
    // CREDITS: Episode edited by Stephanie Wood. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 44 min
    Conservative Convention & Indigenous Interests

    Conservative Convention & Indigenous Interests

    They’re one of Canada’s oldest political parties. Heck, they gave the country its first ever prime minister back in 1867. Today, the Conservative Party of Canada hopes to form the next federal government. They may get their chance: rumours of a summer election abound.
    Making the party’s recent policy convention—and the associated keynote speech of leader Erin O’Toole—possible windows into what another Conservative government might hold in store for Indigenous interests. Joining host/producer Rick Harp to parse the party's policies and pronouncements are Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University, and Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC.
    CREDITS: “Disco High” by UltraCat (CC BY 3.0)

    • 54 min
    Indigenous Incivility

    Indigenous Incivility

    A crapload of controversy. Did an Indigenous member of the Manitoba Legislature cross the line when she claimed members of the governing Conservative party "just don't give a crap about Indigenous women and girls in this province"? The Speaker sure thought so: ejecting the member for refusing to apologize or withdraw her so-called indecorous language. Meanwhile, not so long ago, an Indigenous MP in New Zealand was also ejected from that Parliament for not wearing a tie, or, as he put it, “a colonial noose.” On this episode, our roundtable unpacks unparliamentary conduct: is it just the usual tempest in a teapot of petty politics, or a thinly-disguised dig at unruly, ill-mannered savages who refuse to behave?
    Joining host/producer Rick Harp are MI regulars Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment, and Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC.
    // CREDITS: Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic. SFX: 'boo 01' by tim.khan; 'Quiz Show Buzzer 2' by JapanYoshiTheGamer

    • 38 min
    A Vaccination Conversation (ep 248)

    A Vaccination Conversation (ep 248)

    With COVID-19 immunization programs now underway in Canada and beyond, the basic questions of who, when and where have leapt to the fore. Will the most vulnerable be the most vaccinated in time? Some, like the Métis of Manitoba, say they’ve been left exposed, prompting their efforts to try and cut out the provincial middle man by going straight to the manufacturers. A situation that arguably raises questions about just how much control or capacity Indigenous governments actually have when it comes to safeguarding the health of their own peoples.
    Back at the roundtable with host/producer Rick Harp are Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, and Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University.
    // CREDITS: This episode was edited by Stephanie Wood. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 49 min
    High Hopes for Haaland

    High Hopes for Haaland

    This week, high hopes for Deb Haaland—the congresswoman from New Mexico and citizen of the Laguna Pueblo who could make history as the first Indigenous person to ever serve as Secretary of the Interior for the United States. First things first, though: she still needs to be confirmed by the U-S Senate. Although committee hearings have wrapped up, a vote has yet to be held.
    But amidst all the excitement over her potential appointment, some have struck a more cautious tone about what it may—or may not—make possible. That includes Nick Martin, a staff writer at The New Republic and author of the recent piece, “Deb Haaland’s Ascent and the Complicated Legacy of Native Representation.”
    In this episode, Martin joins host/producer Rick Harp and roundtable regular Candis Callison to discuss why he thinks even “[some]one as capable as Haaland [confronts] an unfortunate truth… [that] whenever Native people have occupied positions of great power within [the] colonial machine [they’ve either left] embittered or transition[ed] themselves into an active participant in the grand American tradition of treaty-breaking and excuse-making.”
    // CREDITS: This episode was edited by Stephanie Wood. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 1 hr 4 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
96 Ratings

96 Ratings

Srevis ,

Everyone Needs to hear this show!

Indigenous voices are critical to our political and social issues! I love this podcast. It is so informative and current. Thank you so much.

MaxMWolfe ,

Prolific Show!

I love this podcast and all the topics and guests. Kim Tallbear has become one of my most favorite thinkers and scholars ever. Thank you for having her on so much! As a white settler, this show is helping me learn so many crucially important things that I never got taught in school.

Vallaerius ,

Informative, provoking, and entertaining coverage on indigenous issues and news

This podcast is one of my favorites, enough so that I’ve been come a monthly funded of the podcast.

I’ve found such value in the perspectives Rick and his many amazing guests. For someone who is trying to learn more about indigenous issues in our communities I’m glad that MI serves as one of my primarily crash courses into important topics and helps guide my thinking on what to learn about.

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