10 episodes

MEDICUS – the Podcast shines a spotlight on the people whose very ideas are shaping the future of science and medicine. Produced by Duke-NUS Medical School, a landmark collaboration between Duke University and the National University of Singapore, the podcast shares the stories of scientists who are working on the Little Red Dot to transform medicine and improve lives for people in Singapore and around the world. We cover what we know best--from COVID-19 science to neurological conditions and end-of-life care, and from diabetes and heart disease to sleep disorders and cancers. We make the science relevant and easy to understand. Never want to miss an episode? Subscribe to MEDICUS now: https://www.duke-nus.edu.sg/medicus/subscribe 

MEDICUS - the Podcast by Duke-NUS Medical School MEDICUS

    • Science

MEDICUS – the Podcast shines a spotlight on the people whose very ideas are shaping the future of science and medicine. Produced by Duke-NUS Medical School, a landmark collaboration between Duke University and the National University of Singapore, the podcast shares the stories of scientists who are working on the Little Red Dot to transform medicine and improve lives for people in Singapore and around the world. We cover what we know best--from COVID-19 science to neurological conditions and end-of-life care, and from diabetes and heart disease to sleep disorders and cancers. We make the science relevant and easy to understand. Never want to miss an episode? Subscribe to MEDICUS now: https://www.duke-nus.edu.sg/medicus/subscribe 

    From burnout to balance: How to adopt a sustainable fitness routine

    From burnout to balance: How to adopt a sustainable fitness routine

    In Episode 10 of MEDICUS – the podcast, we went on a search for a scientist who has woven fitness into his work and family life routine so well that it looks effortless to find out how he does it. With January over, we’re already one month into the New Year, so the pressure to maintain any new or continuing fitness commitment is steadily growing. So, we sat down with Sven Petersen, a principal research scientist with the Laboratory for Translational and Molecular Imaging at Duke-NUS, who talked about his relationship with exercise and how it saved him during one of his darkest times.
    He also tells us how having a young family has helped him gain a more flexible view of his priorities—without foregoing his much-needed workout fix—and just before we let him go, we put this volunteer fitness coach on the spot with a few quick-fire questions to help inspire anyone along their fitness journey. Spoiler alert: running comes up more than once! 
     
    Show notes:
    Music from: Bird Creek (via YouTube Studio Audio Library)
    Produced by: Nicole Lim, Senior editor at Duke-NUS
    For more stories in this issue of MEDICUS, go to: www.duke-nus.edu.sg/medicus/2024-issue1 
    To learn more about the science being driven out of Singapore and the people behind it, go to: www.duke-nus.edu.sg/medicus

    • 16 min
    Collaborations that click: the secret behind the perfect research partnership

    Collaborations that click: the secret behind the perfect research partnership

    In Episode 9 of MEDICUS – the podcast, we’re talking to two scientists about what makes for a perfect collaboration. In modern translational science, new breakthroughs more often that are the product of a multidisciplinary and multi-institutional collaboration. And these collaborations are at their most successful when it is not just the expertise that is complementary but when the people within the team gel well. So, in this episode, two researchers who worked on a project that could make a significant impact on the lives of patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia, tell us how in this project, everything—even a pandemic lockdown—helped turn this into the perfect collaboration.
    [to insert player]
    Sharing their story are:
    ·       Dr Vaidehi Krishnan, a principal research scientist with Duke-NUS Cancer and Stem Cell Biology Programme and member of the Ong Sin Tiong laboratory focusing on understanding the basic pathophysiology of human malignancies in order to improve the management and treatment of patients with cancer; and 
    ·       Dr Florian Schmidt, then a bioinformatician and post-doctoral fellow with the Laboratory of Systems Biology and Data Analytics at the Genome Institute of Singapore, and now a senior computational biologist at ImmunoScape
     
    Show notes:
    Music from: Silent Partner (via YouTube Studio Audio Library)
    Produced by: Nicole Lim, Senior Editor
    For more stories in this issue of MEDICUS, and others, go to: www.duke-nus.edu.sg/medicus
    To learn more about the science being driven out of Singapore and the people behind it, go to: www.duke-nus.edu.sg/medicus

    • 13 min
    Creative connections: Drawing inspiration from science and art

    Creative connections: Drawing inspiration from science and art

    In the latest episode of MEDICUS – the Podcast, three scientists talk about what art brings to their lives, how the two interplay for them, and whether they really are two sides of the same coin.
    In the history of science, Leonardo da Vinci stands out as a giant who mastered both art and science. But there are many more scientists—past and present—who draw on the two, seemingly unrelated, disciplines to help them create something new or express their understanding of the world around us. Albert Einstein painted. Biochemist Linda Long translates protein structures into music. Rock band Queen's guitarist Brian May is a published astrophysicist, while astrophysicist Fiorella Terenzi is best known for converting recordings of radio waves from distant galaxies into music.
    Joining us for this jamming session on music, art and science are:
    Associate Professor Liu Nan from the Centre for Quantitative Medicine and the Health Services and Systems Research Programme, who gleans inspiration from scenes in Singapore, and his favourite painting is a bird’s eye view of the Singapore harbourProfessor Thomas Coffman, Dean of Duke-NUS and Blast Crisis band member, who eventually chose a career in science over music but enjoys the very different dynamics of the twoMs Madeline Kwek, a research assistant from Professor Wang Linfa’s lab, who thrives on collaborating whether that’s with colleagues in the lab and fellow musicians in creating new rhythms and sounds 
    Show credits:
    Music by: 
    ·       Madeline Kwek on the asalato
    ·       Excerpts of Autocool written and performed by Blast Crisis // Studio recording – Durham, North Carolina
    Produced by:
    ·       Nicole Lim, Senior Editor
    To learn more about the science being driven out of Singapore and the people behind it, go to: www.duke-nus.edu.sg/medicus

    • 16 min
    Fishing for telomeres: two scientists are measuring how fast our biological clocks tick

    Fishing for telomeres: two scientists are measuring how fast our biological clocks tick

    In this episode of MEDICUS – the Podcast, we meet two scientists to go fishing. But instead of heading out to sea to cast their lines, their “ocean” is a small tube in which they fish for specific genetic sequences that mark the ends of our chromosomes. Much like the plastic caps at the end of shoelaces, the sequences they hunt for, called telomeres, make sure that our genetic assembly instructions don’t unravel as our cells replicate.
    Today, we know that these caps not only hold us together at the genetic seams, but that they erode with time and therefore play a vital role in ageing—their length is an indication of how many times our cells have replicated, and by extension how old we are biologically. But even though we’ve known about these caps for forty years, using them to help us live longer or at least healthier for longer has been an elusive goal.
    Joining us on the show to talk about telomeres and their own latest research are:
     Li Shang, an associate professor with the Cancer and Stem Cell Biology Programme at Duke-NUS; andJavier Koh, a Duke-NUS PhD graduate and research fellow in Li’s labTo learn more about the science being driven out of Singapore and the people behind it, go to: www.duke-nus.edu.sg/medicus

    • 15 min
    From ragweed to dust mites: we navigate the sneezes and wheezes of allergies

    From ragweed to dust mites: we navigate the sneezes and wheezes of allergies

    As part of this issue of MEDICUS’ wider focus on how the environment affects health, the MEDICUS team is taking a deeper look into what’s going on when the body perceives things from the environment as a threat. We’re, of course, talking about allergies. And joining us on this episode are:
    Our special, preteen guest co-host Juno Young, who had a million questions about allergiesAnd immunologist Ashley St John, an associate professor at Duke-NUS who leads the laboratory of immunity and immune pathology This episode was produced by Nicole Lim, senior editor at Duke-NUS for MEDICUS.


    To learn more about the science being driven out of Singapore and the people behind it, go to: www.duke-nus.edu.sg/medicus

    • 12 min
    Sleeping your way to better health

    Sleeping your way to better health

    “Only sleep when dead.” That’s the rationale that tribes of people, from party animals to early morning exercise devotees, have used to explain their sleep habits. But we may be putting more at stake than we realise when we regularly cut our Zs short because sleep is not just a black hole of downtime. Most adults need about seven to nine hours of sleep a night for optimal performance and health—six if you are among those who really don’t need much shut eye. 
    So, in this episode of MEDICUS – the Podcast, we explore the science behind good sleep, what goes on when we are sleeping and the hidden cost of cutting corners. 
     We also get some handy tips and strategies to help improve our sleep routine and deal with jetlag. 
     We’re discussing all this with:
     -        Associate Professor Joshua Gooley, who leads the chronobiology and sleep lab at Duke-NUS
    -        Ms Hana Yabuki, a research assistant in Gooley’s lab who sometimes sacrifices her sleep to study the state we spend a third of our lives in
    Liked this episode? Check out our other ones, in which we explore topics including how to die a good death, what mosquitoes have to teach us when it comes to finding effective vaccines and treatments for diseases like dengue and Zika or how we can stay a step ahead of the next deadly virus outbreak. And so much more!
    To learn more about the science being driven out of Singapore and the people behind it, go to: www.duke-nus.edu.sg/medicus

    • 29 min

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