70 episodes

The talks from the researchers in the field of infectious diseases. The podcast is hosted by South Texas Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases (STCEID).

microTalk Karl Klose

    • Science
    • 4.9 • 21 Ratings

The talks from the researchers in the field of infectious diseases. The podcast is hosted by South Texas Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases (STCEID).

    Get a Whiff of Cdiff: A Discussion About C. difficile with Vincent Young

    Get a Whiff of Cdiff: A Discussion About C. difficile with Vincent Young

    One of the consequences of the “Antibiotic Era” has been the increased occurrence of infections caused by Clostridioides difficile, also known as “Cdiff”, which in some cases can be life-threatening.  Antibiotics alter the microbes that live in the gastrointestinal tract (the “microbiome”) allowing Cdiff to thrive and cause disease. Dr. Vincent Young is professor in the departments of Internal Medicine and Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Michigan Medical School.  Dr. Young is an expert on Cdiff and its interactions with the microbiome. 

    Dr. Young discusses how Cdiff infections have increased over the past several decades, how fecal transplants have been wildly successful at treating recurrent Cdiff infections, how banking fecal samples can be beneficial, how the gastrointestinal microbiome can influence Cdiff infection, and how playing keyboard in a band has been an important side job.  The MicroCase for listeners to solve is about Speedy Marathon, a cross-country runner who gets more than just a shrimp on the barbie when he runs Down Under. 
    Participants: Karl Klose, Ph.D. (UTSA) Vincent Young, M.D., Ph.D. (Univ. of Michigan) Janakiram Seshu, Ph.D. (UTSA) Mylea Echazarreta (UTSA)  

    • 52 min
    A Career in the Time of Cholera: A Discussion with ASM Lifetime Achievement Award Winner John Mekalanos

    A Career in the Time of Cholera: A Discussion with ASM Lifetime Achievement Award Winner John Mekalanos

    Dr. John Mekalanos (Harvard Medical School) has devoted his career to the study of bacterial pathogens, with a special emphasis to understanding Vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes the deadly disease cholera.  And what an amazingly productive research path he has followed, from the discovery and characterization of the regulon that controls V. cholerae virulence, to the identification of the pilus that allows the bacteria to colonize the intestine, to the discovery of the bacteriophage that encodes the cholera toxin.  His (relatively) recent discovery of the Type VI Secretion System and characterization of its role in inter-bacterial competition and host modulation has had broad impact on all aspects of microbiology.

    Dr. Mekalanos received the 2022 ASM Lifetime Achievement Award for all of his tremendous contributions to our understanding of bacterial-host interactions.

    Dr. Mekalanos talks about the background of some of the seminal discoveries from his laboratory, how important his laboratory personnel (graduate students, postdoctoral fellows) have been to his success, his thoughts on the eradication of cholera through vaccination, and how his love of poker has contributed to his success as a scientist.  
    Participants: Karl Klose, Ph.D. (UTSA) John Mekalanos, Ph.D. (Harvard Medical School) Karla Satchell, Ph.D. (Northwestern University)

    • 53 min
    "Crypto" currency: Cryptosporidium with Boris Striepen

    "Crypto" currency: Cryptosporidium with Boris Striepen

    Watch out for this kind of “Crypto” Currency: Cryptosporidium is a parasite that causes diarrheal disease in humans.  Cryptosporidiosis is a common cause of waterborne disease in the U.S., and responsible for serious and potentially fatal infections in HIV positive individuals and malnourished infants. 

    Dr. Boris Striepen is a Professor of Pathobiology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine.   Dr. Striepen studies Cryptosporidium and how it causes disease. 

    Dr. Striepen talks about how Cryptosporidium multiplies rapidly and has sex inside your intestines, how Cryptosporidium is similar to its cousin the malaria parasite, how genetics can help in the search for new drugs, how someone can catch cryptosporidiosis from a swimming pool or a petting zoo, how bacteria influence the virulence of parasites, and how science beat a career as a harmonica player in a blues band.  

    The microCase for listeners to solve is about the great, fantabulous, one and only Montana Jones, and his adventure in the Congo that almost led to his demise.
    Participants:
    Karl Klose, Ph.D. (UTSA) Boris Striepen, Ph.D. (University of Pennsylvania) Janakiram Seshu, Ph.D. (UTSA) Mylea Echazarreta (UTSA) Huntyr Menezes (UTSA) Michelle Neiner (UTSA)

    • 52 min
    The Chicken Runs: Campylobacter Diarrhea with David Hendrixson

    The Chicken Runs: Campylobacter Diarrhea with David Hendrixson

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans.
    However, C. jejuni is also naturally found in chickens and doesn’t cause them any problems, so people frequently get sick from eating undercooked chicken. Dr. David Hendrixson is a Professor of Microbiology at the UT Southwestern Medical Center. Dr. Hendrixson studies C. jejuni and how it causes disease.
    Dr. Hendrixson talks about why C. jejuni is preferentially found in chickens and other birds, how C. jejuni is also associated with the paralytic condition Guillain-Barre syndrome, how the motility of C. jejuni helps it cause disease, how the motility appendage (the flagellum) of C. jejuni is a beautiful nanomachine, why C. jejuni microaerophilic growth leads to underreporting of Campylobacter disease, could disease be reduced by preventing C. jejuni colonization of chickens, and how an off-the-cuff comment by his postdoctoral mentor led him to jump into a challenging and rewarding field of research.

    The microCase for listeners to solve is about Dusty Broome, a curio shop owner who gets a mysterious illness while cleaning out his shed.
    Participants:
    Karl Klose, Ph.D. (UTSA)
    David Hendrixson, Ph.D. (UT Southwestern Medical Center)
    Janakiram Seshu, Ph.D. (UTSA)
    Mylea Echazarreta (UTSA)

    • 52 min
    The Eyes Have It: Corneal Infections with Eric Pearlman

    The Eyes Have It: Corneal Infections with Eric Pearlman

    Our eyes are one of the most sensitive areas on our bodies, and they are constantly bathed in microbes, and yet we rarely get eye infections. However, certain microbes can take advantage of minor injuries to the eye and cause very serious infections that can lead to blindness.

    Dr. Eric Pearlman is a Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of California Irvine and the Director of the Institute for Immunology.

    Dr. Pearlman studies how the immune system is able to fight against bacteria and fungi that manage to infect the cornea.
    Dr. Pearlman talks about how the eye is a specialized site that is resistant to microbial infections, what types of microbes can infect the eye, how neutrophils help protect the eye, how fungi can cause more serious eye infections due to lack of effective antifungals, why damage to the cornea results in so much pain, why everyone chopping wood should wear eye protection, and how his fascination with parasites led to him studying river blindness.
    The microCase for listeners to solve is about Ally Louia, whose mid-life crisis leads to an exotic vacation and a potentially deadly disease.
    Participants:
    Karl Klose, Ph.D. (UTSA)
    Eric Pearlman, Ph.D. (University of California Irvine)
    Janakiram Seshu, Ph.D. (UTSA)
    Mylea Echazarreta (UTSA)

    • 1 hr 5 min
    Cheese Please! The Cheese Microbiome with Rachel Dutton

    Cheese Please! The Cheese Microbiome with Rachel Dutton

    Cheese is delicious, and also the product of a complex mixture of microbes.

    Different communities of microbes produce the wide variety of cheeses made around the world. Dr. Rachel Dutton is an Assistant Professor at the University of California San Diego who studies cheese microbiomes.

    Dr. Dutton talks about how cheese is made, how the cheese microbiome is a great model for understanding how microbes interact with each other, how the microbial community determines what type of cheese is made, how her experience working on a cheese farm influenced her research, how the long history of cheesemaking practices gives great insight into microbial interactions, where the holes in Swiss cheese come from, and how studying the cheese microbiome has the added benefit of being able to eat your experiments.

    microTalk was pleased to be joined by Dr. Jimmy Ballard (University of Oklahoma Health Science Center) when this podcast was recorded at the ASM Microbe 2019 conference in San Francisco, CA.

    The microCase for listeners to solve is about Houser Sampson, whose voracious appetite for sushi causes him to come down with a mysterious illness.

    Participants:
    Karl Klose, Ph.D. (UTSA)
    Rachel Dutton, Ph.D. (University of California San Diego)
    Janakiram Seshu, Ph.D. (UTSA)
    Mylea Echazarreta (UTSA)
    Jimmy Ballard (OUHSC)

    • 54 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
21 Ratings

21 Ratings

Bjartur108 ,

Where is Dr. Seshu?

I’m a microbiology PhD student and I love the podcast! The mystery cases are especially fun. But is it ever NOT Micro-Seshu who hosts? I want to hear from his alter ego once in a while!

tchen18 ,

Great

I am working on medical mycology and really love this podcast.

Freddy Sea ,

Brilliant topics

Very interesting with great scientists.

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