96 episodes

News and inspiration from nature’s frontline, featuring inspiring guests and deeper analysis of the global environmental issues explored every day by the Mongabay.com team, from climate change to biodiversity, tropical ecology, wildlife, and more. The show airs every other week.

Mongabay Newscast Mongabay.com

    • Nature
    • 4.9, 21 Ratings

News and inspiration from nature’s frontline, featuring inspiring guests and deeper analysis of the global environmental issues explored every day by the Mongabay.com team, from climate change to biodiversity, tropical ecology, wildlife, and more. The show airs every other week.

    Mongabay Explores the Great Salamander Pandemic, Part 1: Are we ready?

    Mongabay Explores the Great Salamander Pandemic, Part 1: Are we ready?

    Another pandemic is currently on the march, and it's got salamanders in its sights. You may not have heard about 'Bsal' before, but it nearly wiped out a population of salamanders in Europe, and scientists worry it could invade the United States--the home of the world's greatest diversity of salamanders--next.
    Is the U.S. ready for Bsal, and can a pandemic in this global salamander hotspot be prevented, unlike the one that's currently crippling human societies globally? What's being done, and what would it mean to lose salamanders on a landscape-wide level in North America?
    This bonus episode of the Mongabay Newscast tackles these important questions, just as spring and salamanders emerge in the North. 
    For the next couple months, this special series made possible by our Patreon supporters called Mongabay Explores will dive into a recent project our writers and editors produced on the topic, to learn what's known about this issue now. 
    More reading from Mongabay on this topic:
    On the hunt for a silent salamander-killer
    Scientists are racing to stop a pandemic before it starts – but will they find it in time? Mongabay's whole series on Bsal is here United States Bsal Task Force website If you enjoy this show, please invite your friends to listen and subscribe via Android, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Pandora, or wherever they get podcasts.
    See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay.
    Please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep this show growing, Mongabay is a nonproft media outlet and all support helps! Supporting at the $10/month level now delivers access to Insider Content at Mongabay.com, too, visit the link above for details.
    Feedback is always welcome: submissions@mongabay.com.

    • 39 min
    Forest fire season 2020: what will it look like and what can we do?

    Forest fire season 2020: what will it look like and what can we do?

    Australia’s fire season may have just ended, but most of the world’s tropical forest regions will soon enter their own.
    We look at what’s driving the intense fires in the Amazon, Indonesia, and elsewhere in recent years with three guests, who discuss what we can expect from the 2020 tropical fire season while sharing some solutions to this problem, which has huge effects on biodiversity, indigenous peoples, forests, and climate change.
    Joining us are Rhett Butler, Mongabay’s founder and CEO, who provides a global perspective; scientist Dan Nepstad, who worked in the Brazilian Amazon for more than three decades; plus Aida Greenbury, an Indonesian sustainability consultant for projects like the High Carbon Stock Approach to forest protection.
    If you enjoy this show, please invite your friends to listen and subscribe via Android, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Pandora, or wherever they get podcasts.
    More reading from this episode:
    Rhett Butler for Mongabay: "Rainforests in 2020: Ten things to watch," December 2019
    "Amazon deforestation increases for 13th straight month in Brazil," May 2020
    Dan Nepstad for the New York Times, "How to help Brazilian Farmers Save the Amazon," December 2019
    See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay.
    Please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep this show growing, Mongabay is a nonproft media outlet and all support helps! Supporting at the $10/month level now delivers access to Insider Content at Mongabay.com, too, visit the link above for details.
    Feedback is always welcome: submissions@mongabay.com.

    • 46 min
    How to photograph wildlife ethically and why that’s so necessary

    How to photograph wildlife ethically and why that’s so necessary

    At a time when so many people are trying to make photographs of wildlife -- to break the pandemic lockdown blues, or to share on social media -- we speak with two guests about how to do this without harassing, exploiting, or harming them.
    Internationally renowned wildlife photographer Suzi Eszterhas shares her experiences and advice, saying that the most important practices are both better for wildlife and capture the most compelling images.
    This is “kind of a win-win,” Eszterhas says, because "we’re treating the animals with kindness and respect and we’re not affecting their lives in a very negative way" while delivering superior photos.
    Also joining the discussion is environmental journalist Annie Roth, who recently wrote an in-depth article for Hakai Magazine exploring how wildlife pay the price when humans get too close in order to snap a few pics that they hope will score them likes on social media. 
    If you enjoy this show, please invite your friends to listen and subscribe via Android, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Pandora, or wherever they get podcasts.
    Please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep this show growing, Mongabay is a nonproft media outlet and all support helps! Supporting at the $10/month level now delivers access to Insider Content at Mongabay.com, too, visit the link above for details.
    See our latest news from nature's frontlines at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay.
    Episode artwork of jackal pups courtesy of Suzi Eszterhas.
    Feedback is always welcome: submissions@mongabay.com.

    • 39 min
    Inspiration for the 50th anniversary of Earth Day amid a global pandemic

    Inspiration for the 50th anniversary of Earth Day amid a global pandemic

    What does it mean to celebrate the 50th Earth Day amidst a pandemic? Our guests for this episode provide options and inspiration to mark this important anniversary in the face of a global virus outbreak, which ironically has roots in the destruction of nature.
    We speak with Trammell Crow, the founder of the largest Earth Day event in the world, EarthX, which has big plans with National Geographic for a virtual celebration, and Ginger Cassady, the executive director of the Rainforest Action Network, an environmental advocacy group that works to end deforestation and respond to the climate crisis.
    They share stories of inspiration, challenge, and triumph as we mark 50 years of Earth Day with an eye on what comes next. 
    If you enjoy this show, please invite your friends to subscribe via Android, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, Spotify, Pandora, or wherever they get podcasts.
    Please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep this show growing, Mongabay is a nonproft media outlet and all support helps! Supporting at the $10/month level now delivers access to Insider Content at Mongabay.com, too, visit the link above for details.
    See our latest news from nature's frontlines at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay.
    Feedback is always welcome: submissions@mongabay.com.
     

    • 24 min
    The link between pandemics and the destruction of nature, with John Vidal

    The link between pandemics and the destruction of nature, with John Vidal

    Acclaimed environmental journalist John Vidal joins the show to discuss the current pandemic's links to the wildlife trade and the destruction of nature. 
    We speak about his recent Guardian/Ensia feature on what we know about the origins of the outbreak, what he’s learned while reporting from similar outbreak epicenters in the past, how the destruction of nature creates the perfect conditions for diseases to emerge, and what we can do to prevent future outbreaks.
    See related Mongabay podcast episode: How studying an African bat might help us prevent future Ebola outbreaks
    Here’s this episode’s top news:
    National parks in Africa shutter over COVID-19 threat to great apes Shell of bioluminescent shrimp not only glows but detects light Seychelles extends protection to marine area twice the size of Great Britain If you enjoy this show, please invite your friends to subscribe via Android, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, Spotify, Pandora, or wherever they get podcasts.
    Please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep this show growing, Mongabay is a nonproft media outlet and all support helps!
    See our latest news from nature's frontlines at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay.
    Feedback is always welcome: submissions@mongabay.com.

    • 23 min
    Songs and sounds of Bering Sea whales and seals reveal a story of change

    Songs and sounds of Bering Sea whales and seals reveal a story of change

    The songs, calls, clicks, and bumps of beluga whales, bearded seals, bowhead whales, ribbon seals, and walrus are the stars of this episode, which also features the co-author of a recent study that used bioacoustics to assess how variation in sea surface temperature and sea ice extent affects these animals' populations in the northern Bering Sea.
    Dr. Howard Rosenbaum is the director of the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Ocean Giants Program, and his team is creating an acoustic baseline for how marine noise pollution and climate change are affecting large mammals in this area of the Arctic.
    Learn more about Dr. Rosenbaum's team's study here and press play to hear the fascinating sounds they captured.
    Here's this episode's top news:
    Conservationists set the record straight on COVID-19’s wildlife links Record-high global tree cover loss driven by agriculture In Afghanistan, a new national park carries hopes for conservation and peace If you enjoy this show, please invite your friends to subscribe via Android, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, Spotify, Pandora, or wherever they get podcasts.
    Please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep this show growing, Mongabay is a nonproft media outlet and all support helps!
    See our latest news from nature's frontlines at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay.
    Feedback is always welcome: submissions@mongabay.com.

    • 31 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
21 Ratings

21 Ratings

riwri1 ,

Great topical podcast!

It’s great to find a podcast so focused on the topic of conservation, that goes in depth on issues. Covers a wide range of perspectives from many experts, with great journalistic integrity.

CrowsKnow ,

Great Reporting!

Mongabay is my go-to source for conservation news. I enjoy the updates on global issues as well as interesting interviews with biologists, researchers and activists. Indigenous perspectives and experiences are highlighted and elevated. Thanks for this awesome work!

Metaphorically Inky ,

Nature, Wildlife, Conservation

Terrific, nicely paced and varied show about nature and conservation. Well-worth a listen. Start off with the Paul Simon interview -- interesting to hear about him and E.O. Wilson; and on the same podcast a nice piece about audio soundscapes and how the variety of wildlife is affected by selected logging and monoculture.

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