321 episodes

Interview with Philosophers about their New Books
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New Books in Philosophy Marshall Poe

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.3 • 95 Ratings

Interview with Philosophers about their New Books
Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/philosophy

    Kim Q. Hall, "Queering Philosophy" (Rowman & Littlefield, 2022)

    Kim Q. Hall, "Queering Philosophy" (Rowman & Littlefield, 2022)

    Why isn’t there a queer subfield in philosophy? How has institutionalized philosophy continued to develop without a recognized specialization in queer philosophy? What would it mean to care queerly for philosophy? And how might that change not only the field, but the possibilities for living? These are just some of the questions raised by Kim Q. Hall in Queering Philosophy (Rowman & Littlefield, 2022). Hall diagnoses philosophy’s straight habits and shows how an intersectional approach to queering philosophy can allow us to practice philosophy otherwise. By building a promiscuous archive to think along with many questioners of dominate norms, Hall argues for a pursuit of wisdom that is relational, experimental, and attuned to other ways of life.
    Sarah Tyson is an associate professor of philosophy at the University of Colorado, Denver.
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    • 1 hr
    Kelly McCormick, "The Problem of Blame: Making Sense of Moral Anger" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

    Kelly McCormick, "The Problem of Blame: Making Sense of Moral Anger" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

    Blame seems both morally necessary and morally dicey. Necessary, because it appears to be a central part of holding others to account for wrongdoing. Dicey, because – in its standard forms – blame involves the expression of anger and aims to harm its target. What’s more, our blaming practices appear to presuppose a kind of freewill that some argue is implausible. In any case, we are aware of the ways in which blaming can go wrong. Are we ever justified in blaming others?
    In The Problem of Blame: Making Sense of Moral Anger (Cambridge University Press 2022), Kelly McCormick defends blame. She develops a novel theory of how agents can deserve a certain kind of blame and answers a range of skeptical views that hold that, as the relevant concept of desert should be jettisoned, no one deserves blame. Along the way, McCormick introduces a range of insightful methodological considerations that help us navigate the debate.
    Robert Talisse is the W. Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University.
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    • 1 hr 7 min
    Pascah Mungwini, "African Philosophy: Emancipation and Practice" (Bloomsbury, 2022)

    Pascah Mungwini, "African Philosophy: Emancipation and Practice" (Bloomsbury, 2022)

    In African Philosophy: Emancipation and Practice (Bloomsbury, 2022), Pascah Mungwini considers the history of African philosophy in relationship to world philosophies. Arguing for the importance of African philosophy to know itself through its past and its present, Mungwini takes up topics such as the characterization of ethnophilosophy as a way to reflect on the emancipatory potential in philosophical dialogue. In his view, intra-continental dialogue, as well as world philosophical dialogues, challenge impoverished conceptions of philosophy, whether postcolonial indebtedness to oppressive paradigms or dominant paradigms which exclude voices. The book weaves together reflection on seminal thinkers in the history of African philosophy, such as Paulin Hountondji, Odera Oruka, Kwasi Wiredu, and many more, as well as investigation into the relationship of concepts like Ubuntu for doing African philosophy.
    Malcolm Keating is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Yale-NUS College. His research focuses on Sanskrit works of philosophy in Indian traditions, in the areas of language and epistemology. He is the author of Language, Meaning, and Use in Indian Philosophy (Bloomsbury Press, 2019) and host of the podcast Sutras & Stuff.
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    • 1 hr 2 min
    Igor Douven, "The Art of Abduction" (MIT Press, 2022)

    Igor Douven, "The Art of Abduction" (MIT Press, 2022)

    How should we form new beliefs? In particular, what inferential strategies are epistemically justified for forming new beliefs? Nowadays the dominant theory is Bayesianism, whereby we ought to reason in accordance with Bayes’s rule based in the axioms of probability theory. In The Art of Abduction (The MIT Press, 2022), Igor Douven defends the alternative Inference to the Best Explanation (abduction), in which explanatory considerations play an essential role in determining what we should come to believe. Douven, who is research professor at CNRS, lays out and responds to traditional arguments against abduction and shows how abduction can be a better reasoning strategy than Bayesianism in many contexts. He also considers how abduction fares in the context of social epistemology, and provides an answer to the traditional problem of skepticism about the existence of an external world.
    Carrie Figdor is professor of philosophy at the University of Iowa.
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    • 1 hr 10 min
    Cécile Fabre, "Spying Through a Glass Darkly: The Ethics of Espionage and Counter-Intelligence" (Oxford UP, 2022)

    Cécile Fabre, "Spying Through a Glass Darkly: The Ethics of Espionage and Counter-Intelligence" (Oxford UP, 2022)

    On its face, spying and counter-intelligence activities seem morally suspect. They tend to involve sneaking, deceiving, and manipulating, as well as various forms of betrayal, treachery, and disloyalty. Yet intelligence and counter-intelligence operations are mainstays of any modern state. Are we to conclude that these activities are wrong, but nonetheless necessary, given the realities of modern politics?
    In Spying Through a Glass Darkly: The Ethics of Espionage and Counter-Intelligence (Oxford UP, 2022), Cécile Fabre develops an intricate account of the morality of spying and counter-intelligence activities. She argues that routine espionage activities are morally justified – and sometimes obligatory – as a means to thwart violations of fundamental rights. However, she also argues that familiar forms of mass surveillance are unjustified.
    Robert Talisse is the W. Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University.
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    • 1 hr 5 min
    Alice Crary and Lori Gruen, "Animal Crisis: A New Critical Theory" (Polity, 2022)

    Alice Crary and Lori Gruen, "Animal Crisis: A New Critical Theory" (Polity, 2022)

    As we lose more individual animals and entire species to catastrophic climate change, habitat destruction, toxic dumping, and other human activities, it becomes increasingly difficult to register the full scope of the crisis. In Animal Crisis: A New Critical Theory (Polity Press, 2022), Alice Crary and Lori Gruen reinvigorate the discourse of animal ethics with a critical theoretical approach that gives us new ways of thinking about what is owed to animals. By theorizing the links between human and non-human animal liberation, they offer ways of understanding why it can be so hard to see, hear, or feel the value and dignity of the animals right in front of us. Offering practices of interspecies solidarity, Crary and Gruen show us that we can transform the crisis we are in, but we must dismantle human supremacism to even connect with the need.
    Sarah Tyson is an associate professor of philosophy at the University of Colorado, Denver.
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    • 1 hr 2 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
95 Ratings

95 Ratings

Gaal Dornick ,

Content + / Form -

What the title (and other reviewers) said. I’m a philosophy professor and love the content but, for god’s sake, PLEASE edit out the interviewers incessant “um”s! The only reason that the podcast is bearable is that the interviews speak better.

Selylidne ,

Unrivaled depth for a podcast

Podcasts that interview people and claim to examine complex and interesting topics are a dime a dozen, but 99% of them never go deeper than the surface level version of the topics. The New Books Network is uniquely different, and New Books In Philosophy is the best of the New Books Network.

Listen to this podcast for long, in-depth interviews with people who literally wrote the book investigating a narrow slice of philosophy.

(Oddly, the interviewers frequently voice assumptions that listeners are in or have been in academic philosophy. This is probably not an accurate assumption about the audience, since the podcast is distributed to the general public via iTunes. But that's trivial enough that it's barely even a criticism.)

jess_simp ,

Excellent Philosophy Podcast

Very impressed with the choice of guests and quality of the conversations. This podcast provides excellent introductions to new philosophical works and thought provoking conversations with authors. Keep up the great work!

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