300 episodes

The Partially Examined Life is a philosophy podcast by some guys who were at one point set on doing philosophy for a living but then thought better of it. Each episode, we pick a short text and chat about it with some balance between insight and flippancy. You don't have to know any philosophy, or even to have read the text we're talking about to (mostly) follow and (hopefully) enjoy the discussion. For links to the texts we discuss and other info, check out www.partiallyexaminedlife.com.

The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast Mark Linsenmayer

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.7, 1.4K Ratings

The Partially Examined Life is a philosophy podcast by some guys who were at one point set on doing philosophy for a living but then thought better of it. Each episode, we pick a short text and chat about it with some balance between insight and flippancy. You don't have to know any philosophy, or even to have read the text we're talking about to (mostly) follow and (hopefully) enjoy the discussion. For links to the texts we discuss and other info, check out www.partiallyexaminedlife.com.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
1.4K Ratings

1.4K Ratings

Dave Hamilton ,

My favorite philosophy podcast

Mark, Seth, and Wes are able to take these super-heady topics and keep them super-heady, all the while making things accessible. They’re like your best nerdy friends nitpicking things with one another yet making you feel welcome at the same time. Clearly these veteran podcasters know what they’re doing, and that's why they’ve been able to do this for so long. Give it a listen, you'll love it!

Eventhorizon022 ,

I've loved listening...

to this podcast since about episode 20. The range of topics do a great job of spanning the "classics", as well as current projects that impact modern life. Besides the guys themselves being awesome, they are always generous with all of their guests.

Simply one of the best podcasts available.

newton314159 ,

Lack of insight

I only listened to the first 30 minutes of the episode on the Nichomachean Ethics. The speakers did not actually start discussing the work until the 9 minute mark, choosing instead to chat with one another about unrelated topics during that time. The primary speaker spoke only vaguely about Aristotle’s arguments, suggesting a lack of familiarity with the text. He did however give off the impression of someone who truly enjoys listening to himself talk. A second and third speaker did seem to have some knowledge of the work but again seemed to only speak vaguely about the text. The episode failed to identify Aristotle’s bridge between happiness and moral virtue. Lacking was a development of Aristotle’s argument that happiness is attained through moral virtue (rather than through the whims of fortune [health/wealth]) because something as noble as happiness could not be subject to fate, but rather must be grounded in one’s own free expression of will. As Aristotle writes, “To entrust to chance what is greatest and most noble would be a very defective arrangement.” Maybe the speakers could reread the text in advance and identify key passages to discuss?

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