22 episodes

Clinical ethics, evidence-based medicine, health policy, medical education, neuroethics, shared decision-making, and more—each month Center for Ethics faculty and their collaborators discuss their ongoing work and research across many areas of bioethics.

The Center and its faculty have been devoted to understanding and teaching the ethical, social and humanistic dimensions of illness and health care since 1977. Learn more about the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences at the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine: bioethics.msu.edu, @MSUBioethics on Twitter.

No Easy Answers in Bioethics Center for Ethics & Humanities in the Life Sciences

    • Education
    • 3.8, 6 Ratings

Clinical ethics, evidence-based medicine, health policy, medical education, neuroethics, shared decision-making, and more—each month Center for Ethics faculty and their collaborators discuss their ongoing work and research across many areas of bioethics.

The Center and its faculty have been devoted to understanding and teaching the ethical, social and humanistic dimensions of illness and health care since 1977. Learn more about the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences at the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine: bioethics.msu.edu, @MSUBioethics on Twitter.

    The Patient Preference Predictor: Tomlinson and Stahl - No Easy Answers in Bioethics Ep 1

    The Patient Preference Predictor: Tomlinson and Stahl - No Easy Answers in Bioethics Ep 1

    MSU Center for Ethics Director Dr. Tom Tomlinson and Assistant Professor Dr. Devan Stahl discuss the Patient Preference Predictor (PPP), a tool they are developing that could potentially supplement advance directives or surrogate decision makers for patients, or that could aid decision making for the "unbefriended" patient who has no family or friend to make their wishes known. Could the PPP be even better than a patient's family member at predicting what a patient may want in a given scenario?

    This episode was produced and edited by Liz McDaniel in the Center for Ethics. Music: "While We Walk (2004)" by Antony Raijekov via Free Music Archive, licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License.

    • 39 min
    Shared decision-making in medicine: Barry and Holmes-Rovner - Ep 2

    Shared decision-making in medicine: Barry and Holmes-Rovner - Ep 2

    MSU College of Human Medicine faculty Dr. Henry Barry and Dr. Margaret Holmes-Rovner discuss their often-overlapping and collaborative work in the areas of shared decision-making and evidence-based medicine. They reflect back on how they got started working in these areas at Michigan State University in the 1980s, and provide insight on where things currently stand.
    This episode was produced and edited by Liz McDaniel in the Center for Ethics. Music: "While We Walk (2004)" by Antony Raijekov via Free Music Archive, licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License.

    • 39 min
    The Medical Ethics Resource Network of Michigan: a History - Ep 3

    The Medical Ethics Resource Network of Michigan: a History - Ep 3

    In this episode, Dr. Leonard Fleck, Professor in the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences and the Department of Philosophy at Michigan State University, sits down with producer Liz McDaniel to discuss his involvement in the Medical Ethics Resource Network of Michigan (MERN), a non-profit organization that existed for about twenty years, beginning in 1986. Dr. Fleck discusses the reasons why there was a need for such a network, and provides insight into the work they did in sharing expertise and helping individuals develop skills that were needed to thoughtfully address ethics issues within a clinical setting.

    • 23 min
    Comparing Chinese and American Bioethics: Cheng and Tomlinson - Ep 4

    Comparing Chinese and American Bioethics: Cheng and Tomlinson - Ep 4

    Guests Dr. Guobin Cheng, Adjunct Associate Professor with the Center for Ethics and Associate Professor at Southeast University in China, and Center Director and Professor Dr. Tom Tomlinson have a conversation about the differences and similarities observed in American and Chinese bioethics. Based in part on work they presented at the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) annual meeting, they discuss specific case examples as they relate to patient autonomy, family and individual identity, and the patient’s right to know or right not to know diagnosis and prognosis.

    • 31 min
    Public Perception of Psychiatric Interventions: Cabrera, Bluhm, and McKenzie - Ep 5

    Public Perception of Psychiatric Interventions: Cabrera, Bluhm, and McKenzie - Ep 5

    This episode features Dr. Laura Cabrera, Assistant Professor in the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences and the Department of Translational Science & Molecular Medicine, Dr. Robyn Bluhm, Associate Professor in the Philosophy Department and Lyman Briggs College, and undergraduate research assistant Rachel McKenzie. Together at Michigan State University they have collaborated on research regarding psychiatric interventions, including pharmacological interventions as well as neurosurgery, like deep brain stimulation. In this episode they share some highlights from their internally-funded Science and Society at State project, which focused on the public perceptions of such psychiatric interventions.

    • 16 min
    Medical Workforce Diversity and the Professional Entry Tax: Bogdan-Lovis and Kelly-Blake - Ep 6

    Medical Workforce Diversity and the Professional Entry Tax: Bogdan-Lovis and Kelly-Blake - Ep 6

    This episode features Libby Bogdan-Lovis, Assistant Director of the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences, and Dr. Karen Kelly-Blake, Assistant Professor in the Center for Ethics and the Department of Medicine at the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine. As leaders of a multi-institutional research team, they were interested in examining strategies and associated rationales for expanding underrepresented minority presence in U.S. undergraduate medical education. In this episode, they provide insight on what their scoping review has revealed, focusing on the notion that underrepresented minorities in medicine are often expected to pursue a service track—an expectation not placed on their white majority peers.

    • 19 min

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5
6 Ratings

6 Ratings

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