22 episodes

Welcome to North by Norway. I’m Scottish-Norwegian, I’ve lived and worked in Norway for over 40 years, and I’ve got a lot to tell you about this extraordinary country. Norway exerts a magnetic attraction on most people. Perhaps the romance of the Vikings and the fjords. Perhaps the modern saga of social democracy. Well, this podcast will range across history, culture, nature, and today’s society.Let’s travel North by Norway! 
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North by Norway Andrew J. Boyle

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Welcome to North by Norway. I’m Scottish-Norwegian, I’ve lived and worked in Norway for over 40 years, and I’ve got a lot to tell you about this extraordinary country. Norway exerts a magnetic attraction on most people. Perhaps the romance of the Vikings and the fjords. Perhaps the modern saga of social democracy. Well, this podcast will range across history, culture, nature, and today’s society.Let’s travel North by Norway! 
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Deep Culture

    Deep Culture

    Come with me on a pilgrimage to the tiny mountain village of Vågå – together with 800 other people. They have been drawn there by one passion, one hunger. To hear the music of the Hardanger fiddle. Delicate and decorative – muscular and feisty. With this podcast, I am doing penance for past sins, having previously believed the Hardanger fiddle to be near-obsolete, a museum piece. And its music unsophisticated. How wrong I was! Hearing the instrument at its mysterious and magnificent best – as played by virtuoso Ottar Kåsa – opened a gateway for me to deep Norwegian culture. It achieves a modern miracle: to be vigorously and unsentimentally alive, while maintaining a musical inheritance. And it also connected up with the deep culture of my own background, on the west coast of Ireland. 
    EPISODE PHOTO
    Detail of Hardanger fiddle made in 1911–12 by Olav Eivindsen Bakkene, Telemark i 1911-12. The instrument belongs to Telemark Museum. 
    From: digitalmuseum.no
    Photo: Bård Løken
    Licence: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
    CONTACT
    Twitter: (a)northbynorway
    Email: northbynorway(a)gmail(.)com
    MORE INFO
    andrewjboyle(.)com
    THANKS
    to Ottar Kåsa for permission to use his recording of Høgsetbenken (springar after Myllarguten)

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    • 21 min
    The Hunt for the King (part 2)

    The Hunt for the King (part 2)

    Hitler demanded that Vidkun Quisling should be Prime Minister. The king said: No! With that, all possibility of compromise was closed off for King Haakon and his government. It was a decision that put them in extreme danger. No monarch or head of state was killed by the Nazis during the war – but on April 11th 1940, they not only tried to assassinate King Haakon, they were also convinced they had succeeded. In fact, the king and politicians evaded the bombing raids on Elverum and Nybergsund. They moved northwards from place to place – to avoid detection and to bolster the spirits of the ever-more beleaguered defence forces. But they finally had to sail for England and exile. As the figurehead of Norwegian resistance, the king’s work from England was of huge significance for Norway’s people.
    EPISODE PHOTO
    King Haakon seeks cover in a birch grove during an air raid on Molde in late April 1940. 
    Photo: Per Bratland
    Licence: CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 NO
    CONTACT
    Twitter: (a)northbynorway
    Email: northbynorway(a)gmail(.)com
    MORE INFO
    andrewjboyle(.)com


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    • 20 min
    The Hunt for the King (part 1)

    The Hunt for the King (part 1)

    Today’s podcast is about the greatest drama of modern Norwegian history. What Norwegians call ‘Aprildagene’ – the fateful days of the 9th, 10th and 11th of April 1940. The greatest drama? How else to describe three days that start with King Haakon in his bed in the palace in central Oslo, and finish with the king and government hunted by the Nazis from town to village to farm. Three days that finish with them stumbling through snow as German planes strife and bomb the ground around them in an assassination attempt. How else describe three days that see a coup d’etat by a politician whose party – at the most recent general election – gained a meagre 1,8 percent of the popular vote. Today, Act 1 of the drama: the 9th of April. The climax of the 10th and 11th comes in the next podcast. 
    EPISODE PHOTO
    King Haakon VII of Norway in 1930
    Photographer: Ernest Rude
    Public Domain 
    CONTACT
    Twitter: (a)northbynorway
    Email: northbynorway(a)gmail(.)com
    MORE INFO
    andrewjboyle(.)com

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    • 29 min
    MUNCH – in his own words

    MUNCH – in his own words

    ‘I walked one evening along a road – on one side lay the town, and the fjord lay below me…’ In this way begins Edvard Munch’s account of how he came to paint The Scream. Besides the Mona Lisa, it is probably the most recognisable image ever created. Munch painted in order to ‘explain my life to myself’. And for the same reason, he wrote constantly in notebooks about his anxieties, his unhappy love life, his disappointments and his creative ideas. His writings are often witty and – from the man who gave modern anxiety its visual language – full of searing insights into the challenges of life and society. For today’s podcast, I have rummaged around in these sources to let Norway’s great artist speak for himself. ‘I know I have to return to the road by the edge of the cliff – that is my road.’
    EPISODE PHOTO
    Edvard Munch: Self-Portrait (1905) 
    Public Domain 
    Owner: Nasjonalmuseet for kunst, arkitektur og design
    CONTACT
    Twitter: (a)northbynorway
    Email: northbynorway(a)gmail(.)com
    MORE INFO
    andrewjboyle(.)com


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    • 23 min
    A Simple Blue Chair

    A Simple Blue Chair

    On the 28th of July this year, it will be exactly 100 years since an extraordinary event took place in the tiny mountain village of Lesjaskog. In the cultural history of modern Norway – well, there’s nothing quite like it. On a simple, blue kitchen chair, one of Europe’s greatest artists was carried to the top of a nearby mountain. A round trip of nearly 8 hours. After 20 summers in Norway, it would be his last view of the mountains for the ailing composer. It was a huge feat of endurance – and of love – by those closest to him to get him to the top and down again. Today, I tell the story of how that Englishman came to love the Norwegian mountain landscape, and how he let if fill his music. For his friends, it was important to let him see the mountains one last time, before his eyesight failed. 
    EPISODE PHOTO
    This simple blue chair made possible an extraordinary event. 
    CONTACT
    Twitter: (a)northbynorway
    Email: northbynorway(a)gmail(.)com
    webpage: andrewjboyle(.)com
    THANKS
    to Sonja Nyegaard for her vocal contribution


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    • 21 min
    A Scot Learns to Ski (Part 2)

    A Scot Learns to Ski (Part 2)

    Learning to go downhill – wow, that was an uphill struggle! Getting into skiing as an adult is all about making a right arse of yourself. But during my first long winter in Norway, I managed to reconnect with a sense of innocent wonder at the world I hadn’t known for years. I would go busking in downtown Oslo in the morning, then back up to the light and the forest. But there were also those three Dark Arts of the Forest that defeated me – a trainee in the tracks! And just think – how you pronounced a single word could be hazardous to your health! Finally, there are a few sobering thoughts about the seemingly fatal damage to skiing as a pastime and sport caused by the effects of climate change. This is the second part about my first winter in Norway. Part One was last week. 

    EPISODE PHOTO
    Felt I looked quite smart, even with clothes and skis bought at a flea market! 
    Ok, just kidding, this is Roald Amundsen in 1909.
    Photo: Anders Beer Wilse
    Public Domain
    CONTACT
    Twitter: (a)northbynorway
    Email: northbynorway(a)gmail(.)com
    MORE INFO
    webpage: andrewjboyle(.)com

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 21 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
2 Ratings

2 Ratings

3745 the Red ,

Very enjoyable

I enjoy and learn a lot on each episode. Takk

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