157 episodes

The NOT REAL ART podcast celebrates creative culture and the artists who make it. NOT REAL ART is fresh, fun and inspiring. It contains material not suitable for pretentious art snobs. Guests include the world-class artists, designers and creatives who drive the $2T creative economy.

NOT REAL ART is hosted by L.A. based art world insiders Man One and Sourdough who bring their devil-may-care attitude to discussing their mutual love — and hate — for the contemporary art world, creative culture, and everything in between.

If you're an an arts professional or creative culture enthusiast, NOT REAL ART is for you!

Not Real Art Crewest Studio

    • Arts
    • 4.9 • 33 Ratings

The NOT REAL ART podcast celebrates creative culture and the artists who make it. NOT REAL ART is fresh, fun and inspiring. It contains material not suitable for pretentious art snobs. Guests include the world-class artists, designers and creatives who drive the $2T creative economy.

NOT REAL ART is hosted by L.A. based art world insiders Man One and Sourdough who bring their devil-may-care attitude to discussing their mutual love — and hate — for the contemporary art world, creative culture, and everything in between.

If you're an an arts professional or creative culture enthusiast, NOT REAL ART is for you!

    Faith XLVII x Erin Yoshi: Unbound by Formality

    Faith XLVII x Erin Yoshi: Unbound by Formality

    Today, guest host Erin Yoshi speaks with South African multidisciplinary artist, Faith XLVII. Faith’s journey into art began on the streets of South Africa in 1997 as a young graffiti writer. In 2006, she began on a nomadic journey that led her to create work in 42 countries. Her evolution from street artist to multidisciplinary artist has created a fluid yet solid bridge into the contemporary art world, and her explorative approach has led her to develop a broad range of artwork, ranging from immersive new media installations and hand-sewn wall tapestries to sculptural bronze works investigating hierarchies of power, as well as paintings and various explorations into printmaking. The thread of Faith's practice can be traced from abandoned structures and landmark 20-story buildings to museums, galleries, and intimate site-specific installations. In this episode, she reflects on the freedom that not going to art school afforded her and how she has gone on to create art unbound by formality. We also touch on the intersection between art and experience and how she drew inspiration from the internet, and Faith shares how she prioritizes her wellbeing by saying no, how she adopted a scrappy, DIY ethos in advancing her own career, and the universal language that she believes is present in her work. You’ll also learn more about the evolution of her career and practice, from graffiti to gallery shows, and the thought process behind some of her most famous murals. All this and so much more in today’s conversation with Faith XLVII!

    Key Points From This Episode:
    Faith walks us through her initial explorations in art-making, starting with graffiti.
    Some of her earliest memories of creating art and the positive influence of Steiner schooling.
    The freedom that not going to art school afforded Faith; creating art unbound by formality.
    How art and experience are connected in her practice.
    Early projects that were transformative for Faith, including ‘The Freedom Charter’ series.
    Ways in which her work responds to antisocial city planning in South Africa.
    Faith reflects on her shift from graffiti to global public art and how the internet inspired her.
    Reeducating the people that follow her work on the evolution of her practice as a commercial artist; how Faith has allowed for reinvention.
    Learn about some of her immersive new media installations and performance pieces.
    Intentionally choosing which projects to engage in by prioritizing her own wellbeing.
    The power and privilege of saying ‘no’ and claiming time to be still, incubate, and meditate.
    Faith shares some of her interests, including ceremony, dream interpretation, and Jungian psychology, as well as deep ecology.
    Hear about Faith’s DIY, self-motivated ethos in advancing her own career.
    What success looks like for Faith now and what she is aspiring toward.
    What it was like being a mother and a working artist and where Faith draws inspiration from.
    Some of her favorite artists, including Blu, Axel Void, and Sebastián Velasco.
    How Faith’s large-scale murals inform her paintings, installation work, and sculptures.
    The universal language of art that she uses to communicate her ideas and emotions.
    Discover the thought process behind ‘Salus Populi Suprema Lex Esto’ on Skid Row, LA.
    Faith shares her very simple advice for young artists: read books!
    Coming up as a woman artist in a male-populated industry and how Faith seeks to reclaim female power and intuition through her work.
    The importance of seeking out mentors and taking on mentees as established artists.
    For more info, visit: https://notrealart.com/faith-XLVII

    • 54 min
    Robert Liu-Trujillo x Erin Yoshi: Sharing Stories of Diversity and Joy

    Robert Liu-Trujillo x Erin Yoshi: Sharing Stories of Diversity and Joy

    In today’s episode of the Not Real Art Podcast, guest host Erin Yoshi is joined by Robert Liu-Trujillo, a fine artist, illustrator, muralist, children’s book creator, and lifelong Bay Area resident. Born in Oakland California, Rob is the child of student activists who watched lots of science fiction and took him to demonstrations. Always drawing, Rob grew up to be an artist, falling in love with graffiti, fine art, illustration, murals, and children’s books at a young age. Rob now illustrates and writes bilingual children’s books to share stories of diversity of joy, like Furqan’s First Flat Top, where readers meet Furqan Moreno, a 10-year-old Black Latino boy who always had “real curly hair” and decides it is time for a new haircut. Through storytelling, Rob scratches the surface of many untold stories, and he is also the Founder of Come Bien Books and a Cofounder of The Trust Your Struggle Collective. In this conversation, he offers some insight into the evolution of his artistic practice and shares some of the narratives in his books, which he created for kids like his son, who is mixed race and bilingual. He also walks us through the process of building stories and creating characters, using art to address social issues, and the power of encouraging young BIPOC artists, plus so much more, so make sure to tune in today to learn more!
    Key Points From This Episode:
    Robert shares some of his early memories of art, starting with his love for graffiti.
    How he learned about graffiti and design and ultimately went on to study fine art in college.
    His lifelong passion for art and how growing up in the Bay Area influenced his work.
    From working in libraries, antique shops, and art stores to teaching; Rob’s career trajectory.
    The evolution of his work from graffiti to illustration, inspired by animation and comic books.
    Finding his niche in children’s books and writing contemporary stories of diversity and joy.
    Hear more about Rob’s DIY route to becoming a published author and illustrator.
    Some of the storylines in Rob’s first books, which he created for kids like his own.
    What Rob’s disciplined art practice looks like and why he believes it’s like being an athlete.
    Rob on his process of ideating, iterating, and creating narratives and characters.
    Challenges he has encountered on his journey and what they taught him about picking his battles, consistency, and the power of saying ‘no’.
    Learn about the Trust Your Struggle Collective and what inspired the formation of the crew.
    Using art to address current and past social issues and to illustrate what could be.
    What Rob has learned from collaboration; why he believes that “steel sharpens steel.”
    Find out what artistic sovereignty and artistic sustainability mean to him.
    How Rob looks after himself by taking days off social media and doing consistent exercise.
    Staying relevant and ‘fresh’ by working on a wide variety of different projects.
    Some of the artists that Rob admires, including Olivia Fields and Abelle Hayford.
    How Rob overcomes artists’ block as a professional by practicing regularly.
    Balancing being a parent and a working artist and inspiration Rob gets from his children.
    What’s next for Rob, including his new picture book, Alejandria Fights Back!
    How he hopes his art book, Art of Rob, will encourage young BIPOC kids to be artists.
    For more info, visit: https://notrealart.com/robert-liu-trujillo-and-erin-yoshi

    • 54 min
    Kristina Wong x Erin Yoshi: Political Comedy in a Post-Satire World

    Kristina Wong x Erin Yoshi: Political Comedy in a Post-Satire World

    Today, guest host and LA muralist Erin Yoshi is joined by performance artist, comedian, writer, and elected representative, Kristina Wong. Kristina has been featured in the New York Times’ Off Color series, highlighting artists of color who use humor to make smart social statements about the sometimes subtle, sometimes obvious ways that race plays out in America today. She has been presented internationally across North America, the UK, Hong Kong, and on the African continent, and has been a guest on late night shows on NBC, Comedy Central, and FX. Kristina’s work has been described as “brutal but hilarious" and, in this episode, she shares her unique perspective on the intersection between politics and art, martyrdom and mental health, and her Western privilege as an Asian American woman. We also touch on vagina costumes, yellow fever, and Kristina’s love-hate relationship with activism and obsession, plus so much more! To learn more about Kristina Wong and how she confronts defunct systems of power through her outrageously funny and highly relevant work, tune in today!
    Key Points From This Episode:
    Kristina shares her relationship with performance art and how her expression has evolved.
    Kristina’s experience of running for office, the intersection between politics and art, and making political comedy in a post-satire world.
    A glimpse into ‘Kristina Wong, Sweatshop Overlord’, her newest performance art piece.
    Crashing a beauty pageant in ‘Fannie Wong, Former Miss Chinatown 2nd Runner Up’.
    Recurring themes of martyrdom, mental health, and saving the world in Kristina’s projects.
    Confronting her Western privilege through hip hop in Uganda in ‘The Wong Street Journal’.
    The importance of listening to those most affected by the issues you advocate for or against.
    Performing stand up comedy in a vagina costume to confront racism and patriarchy.
    Kristina on her viral media appearance about dating white men with Asian fetishes.
    Confronting controversy through comedy; Kristina shares insight into her writing process.
    How she tackled the inefficiencies and desperation of the COVID-19 pandemic in ‘Sweatshop Overlord’ and ‘Auntie Sewing Squad’.
    How making fun of herself as an activist creates more ‘screenshot-able fodder’ for the right.
    How Kristina replenishes herself and the systems of care she has built into her projects.
    The importance of relearning and respecting the labor involved in our artwork.
    Targeting the root of the cause rather than simply being critical.
    Where Kristina gets inspiration from; her love-hate relationship with activism and obsession.
    Find out where you can watch ‘Kristina Wong, Sweatshop Overlord’ until 28 November.
    For more info, visit: https://notrealart.com/kristina-wong

    • 56 min
    Ashara Ekundayo x Erin Yoshi: Joy-Informed Art as a Tool of Resistance and Healing

    Ashara Ekundayo x Erin Yoshi: Joy-Informed Art as a Tool of Resistance and Healing

    In today’s episode of the Not Real Art Podcast, guest host and prolific Los Angeles-based muralist Erin Yoshi speaks with Ashara Ekundayo about the power of joy-informed art for resistance and healing. Ashara is a Black feminist, an independent curator, an artist, and an interdisciplinary creative arts leader committed to an intersectional framework of social transformation that expands the influence and impact of arts and culture on racial and gender equity and environmental literacy, and more specifically one that necessitates a practice of recognizing joy in the midst of struggle. Tuning in, you’ll learn more about the work that Ashara does through her nonprofit, Artist as First Responder, which acknowledges that artists show up first in crisis and celebration to forge solutions, heal communities, and save lives through design, practice, invitation, and presentation. Ashara shares her mission to hold space for creative labor, to create beautiful narratives about joy and pleasure in a society so focused on the trauma-informed, and her belief in the power of art and education to create change by showing us opportunities for who we are and what we can be. You’ll also discover some of the other remarkable projects, platforms, and exhibitions that Ashara has created and contributed to over the years, as well as some of her favorite artists right now, so make sure to tune in today for this insightful and powerful conversation about the intersection between love, art, joy, and rage!
    Key Points From This Episode:
    Ashara reflects on her earliest memories as a ‘gatherer’ around the arts and crafts table.
    How her parents introduced her to art and were formative influences on her practice.
    Hear about Ashara’s career trajectory, formal education, and early desire to be a curator.
    Learn more about Artist as First Responder (AAFR) and how it facilitates joy as a tool of resistance and a mechanism for healing communities.
    Ashara explains the six-point philanthropic and interactive arts platform of AAFR.
    The importance of celebrating artist’s work and arts labor as first responder work.
    How Ashara navigates the traditional arts world as a queer, BIPOC arts leader and creative.
    Learn about the former Impact Hub Oakland, founded by seven artists, including Ashara.
    Ashara shares her belief that we are all born creative and her ongoing mission to hold and create space for creative labor.
    What she looks for in the artists she works with; honesty, curiosity, and enjoyment.
    What Ashara calls the artist ‘flake out factor’ and the importance of authentic commitment.
    How traveling has influenced her work and the perspective it has offered Ashara.
    Some of the priorities that have shifted in her personal life following the pandemic.
    Why she believes having grace and patience with ourselves and each other is the new norm.
    Discover the self-guided Black Joy StoryWindows exhibition in Downtown Oakland.
    Hear about BLATANT, a publication of AAFR, and Ashara’s ongoing conversation partnership with the Museum of the African Diaspora.
    Memorable conversations Ashara has had with Black women artists and cultural workers.
    Ashara on the power art has to create change; witnessing opportunities for what can be.
    How education goes hand-in-hand with creativity and the legacy of who we are.
    Artists to watch, including Tongo Eisen-Martin, Tiff Massey, and Zanele Muholi.
    For more info, visit: https://notrealart.com/ashara-ekundayo-and-erin-yoshi

    • 1 hr
    Art World Horror Stories Vol.4: Flypaper for Dysfunction

    Art World Horror Stories Vol.4: Flypaper for Dysfunction

    Unfortunately, the art world can be flypaper for dysfunctional people, and we all know someone who has borne the brunt of that instability! For today’s show, a few artists have written in to tell their Art World Horror Stories, including Ed Whitmore, who shares how he was treated by a mentally unstable gallery owner who approached him to present a solo exhibition as an emerging artist. Caitlin Burnett tells us how a fire in a laundry room laid claim to all the art she had ever created, while Ruchetta Banjerly reflects on how vanity galleries scam artists with soul-crushing schemes, Sarah Phillips recounts the horror of a gallery curator that discounted the value of her paintings, and Alexander Augustus shares his feelings about unpaid internships, which are all too common in the art world! Tune in today for Volume 4 of Art World Horror Stories!
    Key Points From This Episode:
    Ed Whitmore on how he lost money on an exhibition thanks to a dysfunctional gallery owner.
    Caitlin Burnett tells the horror story of how all the art she’d ever made was reduced to ash.
    Listen in as Ruchetta Banjerly recounts the terror of hidden artists’ representation fees.
    Ruchetta tells the story of her personal experience with a soul-crushing art scam in Delhi.
    Sarah Phillips from Brisbane describes her experience with a curator who told her the ‘story’ was more valuable than her paintings.
    Alexander Augustus shares his tale of exploitation at the hands of an unpaid internship.
    Ending on a positive note: the key lesson that artists have to advocate for themselves.
    For more info, visit: https://notrealart.com/art-world-horror-stories-vol-4

    • 18 min
    Art World Horror Stories Vol. 3: Hope for the Best, Plan for the Worst

    Art World Horror Stories Vol. 3: Hope for the Best, Plan for the Worst

    Today’s Art World Horror Stories are a mixed bag of tragedies and disasters that serve as cautionary tales to empower artists to protect themselves and hope for the best while planning for the worst, because you never know what is going to happen! For example, David Alexander Willis shares the story of painter, Jason Shawn Alexander, who had a show at Booth Gallery in New York City where a forklift was driven through one of his paintings. Yikes! In this episode, we share more horror stories of assholes doing a*****e-y things, stolen intellectual property, and even a real-life haunted art venue. The stories you’ll hear in today’s episode are not read by the artists involved, but by an AI avatar, introducing an added element of spookiness, so make sure to tune in and enjoy!
    Key Points From This Episode:
    Mikel Cirkus shares how Swatch Watches stole his intellectual property after a pitch.
    The lesson in Micheal’s story: do not give away your ideas, sign contracts, protect yourself!
    The horrifying comment that Diane Navarro received from a pretentious museum president.
    How his comment about “living artists” damaged Diane’s art career.
    Dan Monteavaro’s creepy tale of a haunted mural site in the old Howard Hughes Hangar.
    Ally Zeleter on the scams artists face, from contests with crazy submission fees to inadequate pay from curators.
    For more info, visit: https://notrealart.com/art-world-horror-stories-vol-3

    • 12 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
33 Ratings

33 Ratings

R Saez ,

Great resource for art biz newbie

As an Art business newbie and I love this show. I always learn something and Scott does a great job pulling out the personal and professional insights from his guests. Nice work!

Tijera Williams Review ,

Great Experience, Great Opportunity, and So Much Fun to Make!

As a podcast-virgin, being apart of the makings of the podcast was a tremendous opportunity and experience. Sourdough was a great host, and we could go on and on. I am especially appreciative of the opportunity to speak about my art on a new platform that I will definitely be exploring! It felt like the conversation was seamless to produce and was conveyed to the audience in an easy-to-understand delivery when discussing art history. If I could do it again, I absolutely would! These podcasts are great for art learners and art-lovers alike, and I’m so glad to be apart of the Not Real Art family! :)

Rachel O. ,

It’s like free art school!

Great podcast for anyone interested in working in the arts! Definitely a great selection of guests, art forms + processes discussed. A must-listen for any artist!

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