35 episodes

Discussing issues that impact higher education institutions monthly. Hosted by Darren Gaddis. New episodes every Tuesday. Learn more at about.citiprogram.org

On Campus - with CITI Program CITI Program

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 7 Ratings

Discussing issues that impact higher education institutions monthly. Hosted by Darren Gaddis. New episodes every Tuesday. Learn more at about.citiprogram.org

    Women Faculty Members and the Tenure Process - On Campus Podcast

    Women Faculty Members and the Tenure Process - On Campus Podcast

    Kimberly A. Hamlin is the James and Beth Lewis Professor of History at Miami University (OH), where she teaches and writes about the history of women, sex, and gender in the U.S. Her most recent book, Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener tells the remarkable story of the "fallen woman" who negotiated Congressional passage of the 19th Amendment. She is also the author of From Eve to Evolution: Darwin, Science, and Women’s Rights in Gilded Age America and several academic articles. Hamlin regularly contributes to the Washington Post and other media.
    According to a 2020 American Association of University Professors report, women in academia continue to have stubborn challenges inside the academy. In the same report, the American Association of University Professors reported that while women comprise 46.7% of full-time tenure and tenure-track faculty members at higher education institutions, the higher the rank, the lower the percentage of women. Available IPEDS data from 2020 shows the salaries for full-time female faculty members are about 81.2% of their male counterparts. Impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic continue to impact women faculty members disproportionately more than their counterparts. A Nature Medicine article from 2022 identifies how women in academia have been impacted by the pandemic, from falling behind in research publications to grant funding.
    Learn more about CITI Program: https://about.citiprogram.org/ 

    • 21 min
    Changing Landscape of Adult Learners - On Campus Podcast

    Changing Landscape of Adult Learners - On Campus Podcast

    Kristen L. Becker has a Bachelor of Arts in History and a Master’s in Business Administration from Kansas Wesleyan University, a Master’s of Library Science from Emporia State University, and a Doctorate in Educational Leadership from the University of the Cumberlands. Focusing her career on library services as both a public and academic library director, Dr. Becker now serves as an Asst. Professor in the School of Library and Information Studies at Texas Woman’s University. Her research focuses on the impact of administration, leadership, and policy on stakeholders.
    According to the National Center for Education Statistics, adult learners are students who are 25 years of age or older and currently represent approximately half of all college and university students. A report from the Lumina Foundation found more than 25% of undergraduate students are raising a child and approximately 58% are working while enrolled in college or university. Adult learners often enroll in college or university in order to change careers or earn new skills to further their established careers. Often adult learners will have to balance multiple competing priorities while navigating the learning process, such as a career, family, military service, and other circumstances.
    Learn more about CITI Program: https://about.citiprogram.org/

    • 17 min
    Introducing CITI Program's New Podcast: On Tech Ethics - On Campus Podcast

    Introducing CITI Program's New Podcast: On Tech Ethics - On Campus Podcast

    On Tech Ethics is a new podcast from CITI Program focused on all things related to technology ethics, including topics such as artificial intelligence, autonomous technology, and much more. In this episode of On Campus, Daniel provides us with an overview of what to expect from On Tech Ethics, how listeners can become more involved with the podcast, and a preview of the first episode of On Tech Ethics. Be sure to subscribe to On Tech Ethics wherever you listen to your podcasts.

    Daniel Smith (podcast host of On Tech Ethics) is the Associate Director of Content and Education for CITI Program. Daniel manages the development, maintenance, and growth of educational content across various subject areas, such as technology ethics, animal care & use, and environmental health and safety. Daniel received a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism and Technical Communication from Colorado State University.

    Learn more about CITI Program: https://about.citiprogram.org/

    • 8 min
    The Impacts of Grading: Part 2 - On Campus Podcast

    The Impacts of Grading: Part 2 - On Campus Podcast

    Adriana Streifer is an Assistant Professor and an Assistant Director in the Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE) at the University of Virginia. She runs the CTE’s course design institute, graduate student teaching certificate program, and teaching consultations. Adriana conducts research on effective course design, alternative and equitable grading practices, and students’ perceptions of instructor race and gender. Her publications can be found in College Teaching, To Improve the Academy, and the Journal of Faculty Development. With a background in English literature, Adriana teaches undergraduate courses in writing and Renaissance drama, and graduate seminars on teaching and learning in higher education.

    Grading practices in higher education vary a great deal between colleges, departments, and universities. The grading practices of a professor often reflect the instructor’s beliefs regarding a student and their motivation and success within an academic discipline. While faculty members might strive for equitable and fair grading practices, they can often perpetuate unfair policies that disadvantage their students. Faculty members can struggle with evaluating their own grading practices, communicating their practices, and assessing their practices as it relates to grading. While grades can serve as a motivator for some students, traditional grading practices can disproportionally advantages students from a privileged background and disadvantage underserved students. It is necessary and important for faculty members to assess and review their grading practices to ensure they are equitable and fair.

    Learn more about CITI Program: https://about.citiprogram.org/

    • 10 min
    The Impacts of Grading: Part 1 - On Campus Podcast

    The Impacts of Grading: Part 1 - On Campus Podcast

    Adriana Streifer is an Assistant Professor and an Assistant Director in the Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE) at the University of Virginia. She runs the CTE’s course design institute, graduate student teaching certificate program, and teaching consultations. Adriana conducts research on effective course design, alternative and equitable grading practices, and students’ perceptions of instructor race and gender. Her publications can be found in College Teaching, To Improve the Academy, and the Journal of Faculty Development. With a background in English literature, Adriana teaches undergraduate courses in writing and Renaissance drama, and graduate seminars on teaching and learning in higher education.
    Grading practices in higher education vary a great deal between colleges, departments, and universities. The grading practices of a professor often reflect the instructor’s beliefs regarding a student and their motivation and success within an academic discipline. While faculty members might strive for equitable and fair grading practices, they can often perpetuate unfair policies that disadvantage their students. Faculty members can struggle with evaluating their own grading practices, communicating their practices, and assessing their practices as it relates to grading.
    Learn more about CITI Program: https://about.citiprogram.org/

    • 15 min
    Food and Housing Insecurity: Higher Education - On Campus Podcast

    Food and Housing Insecurity: Higher Education - On Campus Podcast

    Mary Haskett, Ph.D. is a professor in the Department of Psychology at North Carolina State University (NC State) where she directs the Family Studies lab. Her primary area of research is the causes and consequences of family distress on young children's social-emotional development. She also examines college student food and housing insecurity. Dr. Haskett co-founded the NC State Steering Committee on Student Food and Housing Security and led the development of a host home program for local college students. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association.

    Food and housing insecurity are impacting college and university students at increasingly high rates. According to a 2022 study from the Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice, 38% of students at a two-year college and 29% of students at a four-year college reported experiencing food insecurity in the last 30 days. In a 2022 report from the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE), more than a quarter of respondents, approximately 27%, reported experiencing the inability to pay either rent or mortgage in full within the last year. While COVID-19 and the impacts of the pandemic played a role in heightened food and housing insecurity for college and university students, other factors contributed, such as rising costs across the country. While some federal, state, and local resources are available, food and housing insecurity are often overlooked, leaving institutions to take creative approaches to meet the needs of students.

    Learn more about CITI Program: https://about.citiprogram.org/

    • 12 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
7 Ratings

7 Ratings

Top Podcasts In Education

Mel Robbins
Dr. Jordan B. Peterson
Jordan Harbinger
Duolingo
Incongruity
Ashley Corbo

You Might Also Like