91 episodes

A podcast hosted by Mathematica’s J.B. Wogan that examines what we know about today’s most urgent challenges and how we can make progress in addressing them. Reimagining the way the world gathers and uses data, Mathematica uncovers the evidence that offers our partners the confidence and clarity they need to find out what can be done, how to make it happen, and where to go next.

On the Evidence MATHEMATICA

    • Science
    • 4.8 • 25 Ratings

A podcast hosted by Mathematica’s J.B. Wogan that examines what we know about today’s most urgent challenges and how we can make progress in addressing them. Reimagining the way the world gathers and uses data, Mathematica uncovers the evidence that offers our partners the confidence and clarity they need to find out what can be done, how to make it happen, and where to go next.

    Preventing Cardiovascular Disease and Promoting Equity in Higher Ed | Episode 70

    Preventing Cardiovascular Disease and Promoting Equity in Higher Ed | Episode 70

    On this episode of On the Evidence, Temitope Ojo and Katlyn Lee Milless discuss their experience with the Mathematica Summer Fellowship in 2021. Ojo is a doctoral candidate at the NYU School of Global Public Health. Her research focuses on implementation science as well as the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease and other non-communicable diseases in a global setting.

    Milless is a doctoral candidate in basic and applied social psychology at the Graduate Center of The City University of New York. Her research takes a psychological approach to understanding how to promote gender and racial equity in education spaces, particularly among college students in STEM—science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

    On the episode, Ojo and Milless discuss their career paths, why they’re interested in applied research, and what they plan to do after completing their dissertations.

    Find a full transcript of the episode here: https://www.mathematica.org/blogs/a-conversation-with-mathematicas-2021-summer-fellows

    Mathematica is currently accepting applications for its 2022 Summer Fellowship program through the end of February. Find more information about the fellowship here: https://www.mathematica.org/career-opportunities/summer-fellowships

    • 42 min
    Understanding the Equity and Justice Dimensions of Energy Policy Decisions | Episode 69

    Understanding the Equity and Justice Dimensions of Energy Policy Decisions | Episode 69

    In her research, Sanya Carley examines the effects of energy policies, including their equity and justice implications.

    In a new episode of On the Evidence, Carley discusses her increased interest in understanding the human element of energy policy decisions: Who makes policy decisions, who benefits from those decisions, and who does not.

    Carley is a professor at the Paul O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University, where she directs the Master of Public Affairs (MPA) Program and O'Neill Online MPA Program. In the fall of 2021, she was selected to be the 21st recipient of the David N. Kershaw Award and Prize, which recognizes professionals younger than 40 who have made distinguished contributions to the field of public policy.

    In the episode, Carley discusses the origin story of her interest in energy policy, why she became interested in the equity and justice dimensions of energy policy, and how she ensures that her research influences decision makers.

    A full transcript of the episode is available here: mathematica.org/blogs/understanding-the-equity-and-justice-dimensions-of-energy-policy-decisions

    Follow Carley on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/carleysanya

    Read her scholarship here: https://bit.ly/3HlLPP5

    Learn more about Mathematica's work on climate change here: https://mathematica.org/sp/climate-change/climate-action

    Listen to our interview with Adam Coyne about Mathematica's recent work around climate action here: https://bit.ly/3msxxDZ

    • 36 min
    Reflecting on Evidence and Insights in 2021 and the Year Ahead | Episode 68

    Reflecting on Evidence and Insights in 2021 and the Year Ahead | Episode 68

    Between a pandemic, an uneven economic recovery, ongoing concerns about societal inequities, and increasingly troubling signs of climate change’s impacts, decision makers in 2021 faced an acute need for timely and reliable evidence about what works to address a range of health and social challenges. In this episode of On the Evidence, Mathematica’s Adam Coyne, Jill Constantine, and Chris Trenholm reflect on the role that evidence played in responding to pressing challenges in the past year and preview how evidence may help address problems in the year ahead.

    Coyne, Constantine, and Trenholm are the general managers of Mathematica’s International, Human Services, and Health business units, respectively. The episode features short interviews with each of them as they discuss some of Mathematica’s most significant work from the past year. Each interview includes a preview of projects, initiatives, and likely themes for 2022.

    This episode is being released in conjunction with Mathematica’s year-in-review feature page, Inquiry to Insight, which includes a curated summary of impactful, evidence-based work by Mathematica and its partners in 2021: mathematica.org/features/from-inquiry-to-insight-in-2021

    The interview with Adam Coyne begins at 2:00.
    The interview with Jill Constantine begins at 18:22.
    The interview with Chris Trenholm begins at 42:08.

    A full transcript of the episode is available here: mathematica.org/blogs/reflecting-on-evidence-and-insights-in-2021-and-the-year-ahead

    • 1 hr 8 min
    Advancing Racial Equity in Fatherhood Programs | Episode 67

    Advancing Racial Equity in Fatherhood Programs | Episode 67

    The latest episode of On the Evidence focuses on the ways that racism and inequity within human services programs affect fathers and families, and how adopting a more inclusive father engagement strategy can benefit children, fathers, and their families.

    Today, federal and state governments, as well as foundations and nonprofits, are emphasizing the importance of understanding the role of racism in American institutions and policies. In partnership with the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Mathematica has been gathering information on what works in engaging fathers across a wide range of human services programs, with the goal of helping fathers and families thrive.

    On this episode, guests Alan-Michael Graves, Leonard Burton, Shaneen Moore, Jerry Tello, and Armando Yañez discuss how human services programs have historically treated fathers, particularly fathers of color, and strategies for improving the racial equity of these programs as it relates to father engagement.

    Graves is the senior director of teaching, capacity building, and systems change with the Good+Foundation, a national nonprofit that works to dismantle multi-generational poverty.

    Burton is a senior fellow at the Center for the Study of Social Policy, a national nonprofit policy organization that connects community action, public system reform, and policy change to create a fair and just society.

    Moore is the director of the Child Support Division within the Children and Family Services administration of the Minnesota Department of Human Services.

    Tello is the founder of and director of training and capacity building at the Compadres Network, a national nonprofit that provides a voice for racial equity, healing, training, technical assistance, and systems change.

    Yañez is a research analyst at Mathematica.

    Find a full transcript of the episode here: mathematica.org/blogs/advancing-racial-equity-in-fatherhood-programs

    Learn more about the partnership between ASPE and Mathematica to identify the strategies human services programs use to engage fathers: https://aspe.hhs.gov/father-engagement

    • 45 min
    Removing Barriers to Child Care for Parents in Education and Training Programs | Episode 66

    Removing Barriers to Child Care for Parents in Education and Training Programs | Episode 66

    In the United States, education and training programs are available to help adults with low incomes secure better jobs and earn higher wages. But, of an estimated 21 million parents with low incomes nationwide, only about 1 in 10 participated in such programs. One reason the participation rate isn’t higher? Inadequate supply of affordable and convenient child care options.

    The lack of child is a major barrier for parents with low incomes who want to engage in training, acquire new skills, increase their earnings, and advance their careers. In 2016 the U.S. Department of Labor launched a five-year federal grant program called the Strengthening Working Families Initiative (SWFI) to remove barriers to child care for parents with low incomes who wanted to participate in education and training programs. SWFI provided 13 grantees in 12 states with up to $4 million each. The grantees were a mix of nonprofits, local workforce development boards, institutions of higher learning, and municipalities.

    As part of the initiative, Mathematica provided technical assistance to SWFI grantees to assist them with identifying areas for improvement, co-creating solutions, and assessing progress.

    The latest episode of On the Evidence explores lessons from SWFI that can inform federal policies and programs, as well as cross-sector community partnerships at the local level that help parents participate in education and training by removing barriers to child care. This episode features the following guests:

    • Robin Fernkas, the deputy administrator for the Office of Workforce Investment at the U.S. Department of Labor
    • Shalonda Jackson, a working mom in Mississippi who completed a pre-apprenticeship training program and found a job in the shipbuilding industry afterward
    • Carol Burnett, the executive director of Moore Community House, a SWFI grantee in Mississippi that provides workforce training to women as well as early childhood education
    • Ruth Mazara, a program manager at Moore Community House
    • Nick Schultz, the executive director of the Pacific Gateway Workforce Innovation Network, a public agency in Long Beach, California, that received a SWFI grant
    • Sandra Dafiaghor, who directs OAI Chicago Southland, a workforce development agency that received a SWFI grant
    • David Moore, who directed the SwiftStart program for Total Action for Progress, a workforce development agency in Virginia that received a SWFI grant
    • Nickie Fung, a researcher at Mathematica who provided technical assistance to SWFI grantees

    Find a full transcript of the episode here: https://www.mathematica.org/blogs/removing-barriers-to-child-care-for-parents-in-education-and-training-programs

    Learn more about Mathematica's work on SWFI here: mathematica.org/projects/strengthening-working-families-initiatives

    • 28 min
    Learning from Foundations' Push to Advance Equity through Evidence | Episode 65

    Learning from Foundations' Push to Advance Equity through Evidence | Episode 65

    Although researchers play an important role in making progress on equitable research, they are one part of a broader ecosystem of people and organizations who make research possible and use research findings to change policies, programs, and practices to improve people’s lives. On this episode of On the Evidence, we focus on the role of funders, particularly those in the philanthropic sector, as early proponents and adopters of culturally responsive and equitable research in social programs. Our guests for this episode are Mindelyn Anderson and Kimberlin Butler.

    Anderson is a sociologist who has studied social inequality and stratification, race and migration, education and social mobility, and health. She is the founder and principal of Mirror Group, a consulting firm that brings collaborative, participatory, utilization-focused evaluation and capacity building to communities and learning organizations, including foundations.

    Butler is the senior director of foundation engagement at Mathematica. Since joining Mathematica in 2019, Kimberlin has helped lead the company to incorporate equity in all aspects of Mathematica’s work. She also works with foundations that are setting the agenda on embedding equity in research in areas like food security, early care and education, and economic mobility.

    During the conversation, Anderson and Butler talk about their career paths, how they became interested in culturally responsive and equitable research, the role philanthropy plays in centering equity in research, and how research organizations can avoid common pitfalls as they seek to incorporate equity in their work.

    Find a full transcript of the episode here: mathematica.org/blogs/how-and-why-foundations-push-to-advance-equity-through-evidence

    • 49 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
25 Ratings

25 Ratings

Kristin's Son ,

Good at economics, not fantasy

If only Kristin was as good at fantasy football as she was at economic and policy.

-Her son who is better at fantasy football

chnet100 ,

The most cogent discussion of CMS transition to APM model

Best explanation of Medicare and Medicaid’s transition from FFS to APM... History, current research and challenges, and vision for the future I have ever had the privilege to hear. Great job to the moderator and each of the panel members!

StuffThatMatters ,

Innovative Practice

On the Evidence provides the listener with important and practical approaches to solving entrenched problems. By challenging traditional approaches, and offering evidence to support innovation, each episode provides a nugget of wisdom that can be replicated in other locations.

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