130 episodes

Outside In explores how the world is changing and how business is changing with it. Host Charles Trevail interviews executives, journalists, authors, and thinkers, exploring the customer-centric strategies and philosophies that are working successfully inside companies, and the consumer trends, industry disruptions, and cultural forces that are influencing business from the outside.

Outside In with Charles Trevail Interbrand

    • Business
    • 4.9 • 60 Ratings

Outside In explores how the world is changing and how business is changing with it. Host Charles Trevail interviews executives, journalists, authors, and thinkers, exploring the customer-centric strategies and philosophies that are working successfully inside companies, and the consumer trends, industry disruptions, and cultural forces that are influencing business from the outside.

    Amanda Hesser, Co-CEO, Food52 - Food connects us to everything

    Amanda Hesser, Co-CEO, Food52 - Food connects us to everything

    In 2009, Amanda Hesser and Merrill Stubbs left their jobs as food editors and writers at The New York Times to start a website and company called Food52. They saw how Americans’ relationship with food was changing: food was no longer a niche interest, but a core part of people’s identities that connected them to every aspect of life. The founders saw an opportunity to use technology and the internet to bring people together around food, a site where everyday home cooks could find everything in one place, from recipes to cooking advice to where to find the perfect set of nesting mixing bowls. A decade later, Food52 has been recognized as one of the world’s most innovative companies, with three brands (so far) in its portfolio, a media content arm that reaches millions of loyal users per month, and a multi-million dollar e-commerce business that sells kitchen wares, home goods and decor, furniture, bedding, and more. Amanda Hesser, Co-CEO of Food52, joins the podcast to talk about the company’s natural progression -- not perceived expansion! -- from food into all aspects of the home, and how she and her team have built a brand that’s genuine, soulful, and “for people who see food at the center of a well-lived life.”

    Listen to this episode to learn:
    • The value of content to build an emotional connection to and loyalty with users; and how building that trust allows Food52’s e-commerce business to move in different directions

    • How Food52 has found success in cultivating long-term relationships with its community and continually evolving as its audience (and the world) changes

    • The cultural impact of celebrity chefs in the United States and their role in making food more accessible, interesting, and fun to a broader audience

    • How Amanda’s background in media and journalism was great training for being a successful founder and entrepreneur

    • How Food52 has expanded its product offerings with three brands: its own Five Two kitchen goods brand; Schoolhouse, a lighting and lifestyle goods company; and Dansk, the Scandinavian-inspired heritage cookware brand

    • Why Food52’s new office headquarters in the Brooklyn Navy Yard will be an expression of the brand and a place for its community, employees, and partners to gather, create, and connect

    • 21 min
    Arvind Krishna, CEO, IBM - A new era for technology and innovation

    Arvind Krishna, CEO, IBM - A new era for technology and innovation

    Thirty years ago, people knew IBM as the “computer maker.” Today, IBM has evolved its business away from computer hardware, shifting focus on consulting and developing and deploying next-generation technologies like hybrid cloud, artificial intelligence, and quantum computing. Arvind Krishna has been there through the transformation. He joined the company in 1990, at IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center. In 2020, he took over as the company’s Chairman and CEO. Having the perspective of both a technologist and a business leader gives Arvind unique insight into where to take the company next. “We lean a little forward in where the world is going as opposed to where it has been,” he says. Arvind joins the podcast to discuss IBM’s role as a catalyst in deploying advanced technology to solve the world’s most complex challenges and make business -- and the planet -- better.

    Listen to this episode to learn:
    • How working through Covid was a “large social experiment” that ultimately strengthened IBM and ushered in a remote and hybrid work future

    • Garage methodology, client engineering, and client success management -- or, the three ways that IBM works together and co-creates with organizations

    • The business opportunity of sustainability and how technology reduces friction, removes waste, lowers costs, and creates a healthier environment

    • The case for a more resilient and diversified supply chain
    Why IBM does not believe in donating money to politicians or PACs -- but would rather gain access to politicians through doing good in the world

    • The three traits every aspiring CEO should have

    • 29 min
    Tekedra Mawakana, co-CEO, Waymo: Autonomously driven vehicles are here

    Tekedra Mawakana, co-CEO, Waymo: Autonomously driven vehicles are here

    People have been buzzing about the promise of fully autonomous vehicles for years. But using self-driving cars in our everyday lives was something that we could only imagine existing in the distant future. No longer. Autonomous driving is here, and people are already using it to get to the mall, send their kids to school, or get dropped off at the airport. Waymo, the autonomous vehicle company owned by Google’s parent company, Alphabet, has deployed a fleet of autonomously driven cars in cities like Phoenix and San Francisco that anyone can order from the Waymo One app -- just like you would with any ride-hailing service. Tekedra Mawakana, Waymo’s co-CEO, joins the podcast to discuss Waymo’s moonshot mission to solve “the greatest engineering challenge of our generation” and how autonomous driving technology is giving people freedom of movement while making the roads safer for all. She also gives an inside look into how Waymo is rolling out the autonomous service, city by city, using insights from early users to improve the Waymo One experience.

    Listen to this episode to learn:

    • Lessons from early users who are co-creating new use cases for autonomous vehicles

    • How the Waymo Driver technology makes the roads safer by removing human error

    • How visually impaired testers have inspired enhancements to the Waymo One app

    • The challenge of navigating consumers’ expectations versus the realities of what the technology can do

    • How launching Waymo in different types of cities, with vastly different topographies and road conditions, is advancing the learnings of Waymo Driver and enabling it to scale much faster

    • 23 min
    Francesco Starace, CEO, Enel: A Renewable Future is Inevitable

    Francesco Starace, CEO, Enel: A Renewable Future is Inevitable

    Eliminating the world’s dependence on fossil fuels might seem like a farfetched goal. But to Francesco Starace, decarbonization is inevitable. As a nuclear scientist and the CEO of Enel, one of Europe’s largest energy companies serving 70+ million customers worldwide, Starace has seen firsthand the accelerated transition towards renewables over the past few years. It’s driven, he says, by digital transformation, innovation, and the economic viability of green energy. Global events, like the pandemic and the war in Ukraine, have only intensified this acceleration. Starace joins the podcast to discuss the future of energy, why “electrifying society” is achievable well before 2050, and the forces changing the way we consume (and produce) energy.

    Listen to this episode to learn:

    • How the pandemic tested our energy systems by dramatically changing energy consumption overnight, and how grid operators successfully adjusted in real-time

    • Why bringing sustainable energy to Africa needs to be centered around metropolitan areas, where most people will live in the future

    • The complicated energy dynamic created by the war in Ukraine, and why it will require us to insulate ourselves from gas by whatever means possible

    • Why globalization isn’t going away; it’s “mutating”

    • The emergence of consumers as energy producers and why they will help fuel energy demand

    • Why the future of electrification won’t be possible without customer centricity

    • 24 min
    David Rodin: Ethics is Now a Defining Aspect of Business

    David Rodin: Ethics is Now a Defining Aspect of Business

    CSR. ESG. Purpose. Code of Conduct. There’s an endless succession of acronyms and phrases that companies use to describe what a moral philosopher would call “ethics.” Or, put simply: how individuals and organizations can do right by others. David Rodin is the Founder and Chair of Principia Advisory and is one of the world’s foremost experts on ethics and organizational culture. For years, David says, his clients mostly sought guidance during an acute crisis or when something went wrong inside their company. But recently, companies are proactively seeking the same guidance, realizing that ethics are fundamental to their business, brand promise, and market position. David joins the podcast to discuss why ethics can be a competitive advantage and risk mitigator that informs and underlies business decisions. He also explains why companies are increasingly looking to be part of the solution to a range of societal issues, and why this “generational shift” towards ethics will be a defining aspect of business for decades to come.

    Listen to this episode to learn:
    • The difference between utilitarianism, deontology, and virtue ethics -- and the three key ethical questions every organization should be asking themselves

    • Why, in order to drive ethical change and to build ethical capacity, you need to look at the organization as an organic whole (i.e., look at its “software and hardware”)

    • How the war in Ukraine has sparked a fundamental shift in how businesses operate on an ethical level

    • Why the language companies use around purpose and values is less important than their orientation around and commitment to ethical values

    • Why global organizations need to consider regional differences and define their ethical red lines

    • How do we retain the best parts of globalization, but at the same time make it more ethical and values-infused?

    • 26 min
    Patricia Cohen, The New York Times: At a global turning point

    Patricia Cohen, The New York Times: At a global turning point

    Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has triggered the largest humanitarian and refugee crisis in Europe since WWII, threatening the global economy and upending decades of relative geopolitical stability. Patricia Cohen, Global Economics Correspondent at The New York Times, believes we’re at a “real turning point” in global affairs and a “time of incredible unpredictability.” She’s been covering this story since the war in Ukraine began from an economic perspective, reporting on how other nations, particularly European nations, are responding to Russian aggression and the impact the crisis is having on their economies. Patricia joins the podcast to discuss how the war in Ukraine has overturned decades of active integration and positive cooperation between advanced industrial democracies and is moving globalization as we know it into a new, more regionalized phase.

    Listen to this episode to learn:
    • How a Russian economy that only accounts for between 1% to 2% of global GDP still has the ability to disrupt everything from global energy markets, to supply chains, to food security

    • Why governments, businesses, and consumers are conflicted over their own self interest and their moral principles when it comes to how far they’re willing to go in response to the war

    • Did European nations naively miscalculate their heavy dependence on Russian oil and gas (and is the war -- not climate change -- going to finally accelerate the adoption of renewable energy)?

    • Why we should be concerned about the huge debt crisis and food shortage that’s looming among poorer nations

    • Where this conflict might be headed and why this crisis might have opened an opportunity for global cooperation

    For more information, visit https://www.nytimes.com/by/patricia-cohen

    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
60 Ratings

60 Ratings

Arlie K ,

A must listen!

Outside In has quickly become a favorite in my feed! I'm consistently impressed by the engaging conversations, insightful content, and actionable ideas. Charles knocks it out of the park every time!

malfoxley ,

Great show!

Charles, host of the Outside In podcast, highlights all aspects of business, entrepreneurship and more in this can’t miss podcast! The host and expert guests offer insightful advice and information that is helpful to anyone that listens!

JoshCrist ,

Entertaining, insightful and actionable! 🔥

Whether you’re already a leader who enjoys wrestling with the shifting landscape of our modern world, or just getting started as a catalyst for change within your organization - this is a must-listen podcast for you! Charles does an incredible job leading conversations that cover a huge breadth of topics related to the ins and outs of building resilient, courageous and customer-centric cultures - from leaders who’ve actually walked the path. Highly recommend listening and subscribing!

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