289 episodes

PA Books features authors of books about Pennsylvania-related topics. These hour-long conversations allow authors to discuss both their subject matter and inspiration behind the books.

PA BOOKS on PC‪N‬ PCN - Pennsylvania Cable Network

    • Books
    • 4.3 • 48 Ratings

PA Books features authors of books about Pennsylvania-related topics. These hour-long conversations allow authors to discuss both their subject matter and inspiration behind the books.

    “Salut!: France Meets Philadelphia” with Lynn Miller & Therese Dolan

    “Salut!: France Meets Philadelphia” with Lynn Miller & Therese Dolan

    One highly visible example of French influence on the city of Philadelphia is the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, modeled on the Champs-Élysées. In "Salut!", Lynn Miller and Therese Dolan trace the fruitful, three-centuries-long relationship between the City of Brotherly Love and France. This detailed volume illustrates the effect of Huguenots settling in Philadelphia and 18-year-old William Penn visiting Paris, all the way up through more recent cultural offerings that have helped make the city the distinctive urban center it is today. "Salut!" provides a history of Philadelphia seen through a particular cultural lens. The authors chronicle the French influence during colonial and revolutionary times. They highlight the contributions of nineteenth-century French philanthropists, such as Stephen Girard and the Dupont family. And they showcase the city’s vibrant visual arts community featuring works from the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Rodin Museum, the Barnes Foundation, and the Joan of Arc sculpture, as well as studies of artists Thomas Eakins, Mary Cassatt, and Henry Ossawa Tanner. There is also a profile of renowned Le Bec-Fin chef Georges Perrier, who made Philadelphia a renowned culinary destination in the twentieth century.

    Lynn Miller is Professor Emeritus of Political Science at Temple University.

    Therese Dolan is Professor Emerita of Art History at Temple University's Tyler School of Art and Architecture.

    Description courtesy of Temple University Press.

    • 56 min
    “Out in Central Pennsylvania” with William Burton with Barry Loveland

    “Out in Central Pennsylvania” with William Burton with Barry Loveland

    Outside of major metropolitan areas, the fight for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights has had its own unique and rich history—one that is quite different from the national narrative set in New York and California. "Out in Central Pennsylvania" highlights one facet of this lesser-known but equally important story, immersing readers in the LGBTQ community building and social networking that has taken place in the small cities and towns in the heart of Pennsylvania from the 1960s to the present day. Drawing from oral histories and the archives of the LGBT Center of Central PA History Project, this book recounts the innovative ways that LGBTQ central Pennsylvanians organized to demand civil rights and to improve their quality of life in a region that often rejected them.

    William Burton is an author based in Provincetown, Massachusetts.

    Barry Loveland is retired from the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission and is the cofounder and chair of the LGBT Center of Central PA History Project.

    Description courtesy of Penn State Press.

    • 57 min
    “Moravian Soundscapes” with Sarah Justina Eyerly

    “Moravian Soundscapes” with Sarah Justina Eyerly

    In "Moravian Soundscapes," Sarah Eyerly contends that the study of sound is integral to understanding the interactions between German Moravian missionaries and Native communities in early Pennsylvania. In the mid-18th century, when the frontier between settler and Native communities was a shifting spatial and cultural borderland, sound mattered. People listened carefully to each other and the world around them. In Moravian communities, cultures of hearing and listening encompassed and also superseded musical traditions such as song and hymnody. Complex biophonic, geophonic, and anthrophonic acoustic environments―or soundscapes―characterized daily life in Moravian settlements such as Bethlehem, Nain, Gnadenhütten, and Friedenshütten. Through detailed analyses and historically informed recreations of Moravian communal, environmental, and religious soundscapes and their attendant hymn traditions, "Moravian Soundscapes" explores how sounds―musical and nonmusical, human and nonhuman―shaped the Moravians' religious culture. Combined with access to an interactive website that immerses the reader in mid-18th century Pennsylvania, and framed with an autobiographical narrative, Moravian Soundscapes recovers the roles of sound and music in Moravian communities and provides a road map for similar studies of other places and religious traditions in the future.

    Sarah Eyerly is Associate Professor of Musicology and Director of the Early Music Program at the Florida State University.

    • 56 min
    “Hell with the Lid Off” with Ed Gruver and Jim Campbell

    “Hell with the Lid Off” with Ed Gruver and Jim Campbell

    "Hell with the Lid Off" looks at the ferocious five-year war waged by Pittsburgh and Oakland for NFL supremacy during the turbulent seventies. The roots of their rivalry dated back to the 1972 playoff game in Pittsburgh that ended with the “Immaculate Reception,” Franco Harris’s stunning touchdown that led the Steelers to a win over the Raiders in their first postseason meeting. That famous game ignited a fiery rivalry for NFL supremacy. Between 1972 and 1977, the Steelers and the Raiders—between them boasting an incredible twenty-six Pro Football Hall of Famers—collided in the playoffs five straight seasons and in the AFC title game three consecutive years.

    Ed Gruver is an award-winning sportswriter and the author of several books.

    Jim Campbell has worked at the Pro Football Hall of Fame and was a member of the Steelers’ organization during their dynasty decade in the 1970s. He has written for numerous NFL publications and has authored several books on the NFL.

    Description courtesy of University of Nebraska Press.

    • 57 min
    “Preserving the White Man’s Republic” with Joshua Lynn

    “Preserving the White Man’s Republic” with Joshua Lynn

    In "Preserving the White Man’s Republic: Jacksonian Democracy, Race, and the Transformation of American Conservatism," historian Joshua Lynn reveals how in the years before the Civil War the national Democratic Party rebranded majoritarian democracy and liberal individualism as conservative means for white men in the South and North to preserve their mastery. Responding to fears of African American and female political agency, Democrats in the late 1840s and 1850s reinvented themselves as "conservatives" and repurposed Jacksonian Democracy as a tool for local majorities of white men to police racial and gender boundaries by democratically withholding rights. With the policy of "popular sovereignty," Democrats left slavery’s expansion to white men’s democratic decision-making. They also promised white men local democracy and individual autonomy regarding temperance, religion, and nativism. Translating white men’s household mastery into political power over all women and Americans of color, Democrats united white men nationwide and made democracy a conservative assertion of white manhood. Democrats thereby turned traditional Jacksonian principles—grassroots democracy, liberal individualism, and anti-statism—into staples of conservatism.

    Joshua A. Lynn is Assistant Professor of History at Eastern Kentucky University.

    Description courtesy of the University of Virginia Press.

    • 54 min
    "The Delaware River Story" with Lee Hartman

    "The Delaware River Story" with Lee Hartman

    The Delaware River flows some 330 miles from its headwaters near Hancock, New York, to the mouth of the Delaware Bay. It is the longest free-flowing river east of the Mississippi and one of America’s most important rivers. Not only is it the primary water supply for New York City, but it provides clean drinking water to every home within a 150-mile radius. When the reservoirs were built on the East and West Branches, they disrupted the natural flows and turned nature upside down. The once-warm waterway now has cooler flows creating a self-sustaining wild trout population and establishing a modern-day fishing and boating industry to fuel the economy of the Upper Delaware River communities. Focusing on both the history and the author’s personal story in helping preserve the fishery, this book gives readers a colorful and unique perspective of what it’s like to fish the Delaware and how important it is to protect the cold-water fishery that is so valuable to the economy of the region.

    Lee Hartman lives along the Upper Delaware River in Equinunk, PA. He is a 45-year veteran on the Delaware system and former owner of Indian Springs Fly Fishing Camp in Lordville, New York. Lee continues to guide on the river and host anglers to great fly-fishing destinations throughout the world.

    Description courtesy of Stackpole Books.

    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
48 Ratings

48 Ratings

ACG@history ,

Thank You Brian Lockman

This podcast was hosted by Brian Lockman for many years and he was fantastic. Looking forward to more of the best interviews in podcasting.

seaxz ,

Was good now it just leans left

Like the title said there used to be all kinds of stuff on here. Now it seems like it all slants hard left. Whether it be historically or present day. And I like that every once and awhile but it just seems like your bludgeoning me with it. A little bit of balance or no slants at all could easy make this a five again

TildaJean ,

This podcast is almost inaudible

I gave up listening to this days podcast because I cannot discern the content. One star given.

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