15 episodes

This podcast interprets the latest scientific discoveries in psychology, as well as techniques and principles from ancient spiritual traditions, and gives you tools to put them into practice.

Peace at Last‪!‬ Fabrice Nye

    • Education
    • 4.9 • 22 Ratings

This podcast interprets the latest scientific discoveries in psychology, as well as techniques and principles from ancient spiritual traditions, and gives you tools to put them into practice.

    013: Hope Is a Four-Letter Word

    013: Hope Is a Four-Letter Word

    In this thought-provoking podcast episode, we delve into the complex topic of hope and its various dimensions. The discussion begins by questioning whether hope is inherently good or bad, taking inspiration from the myth of Pandora's box. This narrative leads to an exploration of different definitions of hope, from dictionaries that offer a neutral perspective to various public figures and scholars who have attempted to redefine this multifaceted emotion. The Duality of Hope The podcast delves into the duality of hope, pointing out that hope can exist on a spectrum between certainty of success and certainty of failure. Hope, it argues, emerges when there's uncertainty about achieving desired outcomes. This provides the foundation for an intriguing exploration of hope in different contexts. Authors and Philosophers Who Tried to Redefine "Hope" The episode introduces quotes from influential figures like Vaclav Havel, Greta Thunberg, and David Feldman, who challenge conventional definitions of hope. They offer their unique interpretations, suggesting that hope is more about finding meaning and purpose rather than simply expecting positive outcomes. Hope vs. Optimism A distinction is made between hope and optimism. Hope is described as a specific emotion directed at a particular event or situation, whereas optimism is a broader attitude toward life, expecting the best possible outcome. This distinction highlights the nuanced nature of hope. The Dark Side of Hope The podcast explores the potential downsides of hope, including feelings of failure, unrealistic expectations, and the tendency to live in the future rather than embracing the present. It also addresses how hope can sometimes blind us to challenges and inhibit effective problem-solving. The Two Kinds of Hope The episode introduces the concept of "wise hope" as distinct from ordinary hope. Wise hope is portrayed as an active force, embracing uncertainty and suffering, while ordinary hope is often driven by desire and unrealistic expectations. Positive Visualization The discussion touches on the power of positive visualization, suggesting that it can motivate individuals but should be balanced with concrete actions to avoid complacency. Snyder's Hope Theory Dr. C.R. Snyder's Hope Theory is introduced, emphasizing that hope involves three key components: goals, agency, and pathways. This theory provides a framework for understanding hope as a skill that can be developed and is a powerful predictor of success. The episode ends with a beautiful poem by Jennifer Welwood, inviting listeners to embrace the complexities of hope and dance the wild dance of no hope. In a world where hope is often seen as a universally positive emotion, this podcast challenges us to think deeper about the multifaceted nature of hope and encourages us to navigate it with wisdom and a clearer understanding. It's a thought-provoking exploration that leaves us pondering the true essence of hope in our lives. See Also (1991), by Vaclav Havel (2019), Greta Thunberg’s speech to world leaders in Davos (2022), by David Feldman (2009), by David Feldman (2006), by Barack Obama (2004), by Barack Obama (2005), by Rabbi Jonathan Sacks , by Alan Watts (2016), by Pema Chödrön (2022), by Roshi Joan Halifax (2011), by Karen Krett (2021), by Jacqueline Mattis (podcast) (2011), by Heather Barry Kappes & Gabriele Oettingen (2000), by C.R. Snyder Copyright Music: Eastern Thought by Kevin MacLeod Link: License:   Music: Umbrella Pants by Kevin MacLeod Free download: Licensed under CC BY 4.0:   Music: I Knew a Guy by Kevin MacLeod Free download: Licensed under CC BY 4.0:   Music: Desert Night by Sascha Ende Free download: Licensed under CC BY 4.0:   Music: Wide Landscapes Of Middle East by MusicLFiles Free download: Licensed under CC BY 4.0:

    • 36 min
    012: You Don't Get Your Just Deserts

    012: You Don't Get Your Just Deserts

    The expression “getting your just deserts,” according to Merriam-Webster, means receiving the punishment that you deserve. This episode looks at rewards as well as punishment. The idea is to explore whether we can be said to deserve something or not. I explain that there are three separate meanings for this notion: 1. Merit — What we earn through talent and effort 2. Civil Rights — What our culture, society, and laws say we are entitled to 3. Intrinsic Deserts — What we imagine is inherently ours from the simple fact of being human See Also 1. The Tyranny of Merit (2020), by Michael J. Sandel 2. Dependent Origination, in Buddhist Philosophy 3. Not What Should Be, by Alan Watts 4. Changing Attitudes on Same-Sex Marriage (2019), by the Pew Research Center

    • 20 min
    011: Three Little Words That Can Mess up Your Life (Part 3) — Want

    011: Three Little Words That Can Mess up Your Life (Part 3) — Want

    Today’s topic is about the word “want.” Even though we spent the last two episodes talking about how having preferences is a healthy alternative to imposing “shoulds” or “needs” upon ourselves. I present here three reasons why we fall into some thinking traps when we use the word “want.” Those reasons are: We don’t really know what is best for us. We tell ourselves that we want one thing, when evidence points to the contrary. We mainly know what we don’t want, rather than what we do want. See Also (2006), by Dan Gilbert , by Aesop (2009), by Rick Hanson Music: Eastern Thought by Kevin MacLeod Link: License:

    • 18 min
    010: Three Little Words That Can Mess up Your Life (Part 2) — Need

    010: Three Little Words That Can Mess up Your Life (Part 2) — Need

    In this second part of a miniseries on the words we say to ourselves that create tension and distress, today’s word is “Need.” Today we talk about: The psychological theories of needs, which are in fact theories of human motivation. Byron Katie’s radical approach to needs. The fallacy of speaking in terms of absolute needs. How to use the word “need” in a relative context. Practice Semantic Method — replacing “need” with “It would be nice if…” or “I would prefer it if…” and remembering that the use of the word “need” implies the subordinating conjunction “in order to” (relative contextualization). See Also (1943), by Abraham Maslow (2008), by Edward Deci & Richard Ryan (2001), by Byron Katie Music: Night on the Docks - Sax by Kevin MacLeod Link: License:

    • 16 min
    009: Three Little Words That Can Mess up Your Life (Part 1) — Should

    009: Three Little Words That Can Mess up Your Life (Part 1) — Should

    Are you “shoulding” all over yourself? The word “Should” happens to be one of the most insidious in the English language. In today’s episode, we talk about how: Psychoanalyst Karen Horney called “The Tyranny of the Should” this tendency to create an idealized self and a rejection of the real self. Albert Ellis spoke about the three kinds of “musts.” Using the word “should” is conveying criticism, like “scolding” oneself (or others). The value statements implied by that word are arbitrary and relative. The laws of Nature do not follow any “should,” but instead are what they are, and we don’t get a vote. Practice Rephrasing — replacing “should” with “is” or “does” or “I would prefer it if…” Reattribution — considering the alternative causes of events and behaviors. Positive Reframing — acknowledging that Should Statements come out of a very good place in you, that they reflect positive attributes and values, and that there is a helpful side to holding those beliefs. See Also , by Karen Horney , by Albert Ellis , the Online Etymology Dictionary  

    • 14 min
    008: There Are Only Three Kinds of Business

    008: There Are Only Three Kinds of Business

    Byron Katie likes to say that there are only three kinds of business in the world: mine, yours, and God’s. God’s business refers to the forces of Nature or to events that are beyond human control. Your business, is someone else’s life, including what they feel, think, and choose to do. My business is what’s left, that is, what is within my control. In his popular book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, Stephen Covey describes the notion of Circle of Concern and Circle of Influence. We add here the Circle of Control, where Circle of Control = What I choose to do and can directly manipulate. Circle of Influence = What is not directly within my control, but can be affected by what I do. Circle of Concern = What I mentally worry about, whether or not I can do anything about it.  

    • 20 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
22 Ratings

22 Ratings

babe if the 60s ,

Wonderful series

Fabrice is such a good therapist and the podcast make him even better because it Ly’s you go behind to understand what’s going on in your mind. Fascinating series. Please make
More fabrice!

jumpShotMgee ,

very good and underated

I found fabrice from the feeling good podcast and enjoyed his insights. I remembered he had started his own podcast. I have been listening and it has been great so far

APWWD ,

Great introductory podcast!

I am so looking forward to what Fabrice has to offer in Peace at Last! Fabrice offers a wealth of knowledge and new perspectives that will be beneficial to any listener who is looking to improve how they think and feel through considering paths of thought and personal growth. Anyone will be able to find something in the podcasts to resonate with or to enhance their life through how they think. I’m looking forward to devouring this whole series!

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