410 episodes

Wanna see a trick? Give us any topic and we can tie it back to the economy. At Planet Money, we explore the forces that shape our lives and bring you along for the ride. Don't just understand the economy – understand the world.Wanna go deeper? Subscribe to Planet Money+ and get sponsor-free episodes of Planet Money, The Indicator, and Planet Money Summer School. Plus access to bonus content. It's a new way to support the show you love. Learn more at plus.npr.org/planetmoney

Planet Money Planet Money

    • Business
    • 4.6 • 28.8K Ratings

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Wanna see a trick? Give us any topic and we can tie it back to the economy. At Planet Money, we explore the forces that shape our lives and bring you along for the ride. Don't just understand the economy – understand the world.Wanna go deeper? Subscribe to Planet Money+ and get sponsor-free episodes of Planet Money, The Indicator, and Planet Money Summer School. Plus access to bonus content. It's a new way to support the show you love. Learn more at plus.npr.org/planetmoney

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    What makes an ad memorable? We ask a neuroscientist (Planet Money+)

    What makes an ad memorable? We ask a neuroscientist (Planet Money+)

    Commercials use all sorts of tricks to get us to remember their brands — surprise, nostalgia, repetition. In today's bonus episode, Darian Woods talks with Charan Ranganath, director of the Dynamic Memory Lab at the University of California at Davis, about how those techniques work on our brains. Ranganath's new book is Why We Remember: Unlocking Memory's Power to Hold on to What Matters.Show your support for Planet Money and the reporting we do by subscribing to Planet Money+ in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. You'll be able to unlock this episode and other great bonus content. Regular episodes remain free to listen! Email the show at planetmoney@npr.org.

    Shopping for parental benefits around the world

    Shopping for parental benefits around the world

    It is so expensive to have a kid in the United States. The U.S. is one of just a handful of countries worldwide with no federal paid parental leave; it offers functionally no public childcare (and private childcare is wildly expensive); and women can expect their pay to take a hit after becoming a parent. (Incidentally, men's wages tend to rise after becoming fathers.)

    But outside the U.S., many countries desperately want kids to be born inside their borders. One reason? Many countries are facing a looming problem in their population demographics: they have a ton of aging workers, fewer working-age people paying taxes, and not enough new babies being born to become future workers and taxpayers. And some countries are throwing money at the problem, offering parents generous benefits, even including straight-up cash for kids.

    So if the U.S. makes it very hard to have kids, but other countries are willing to pay you for having them....maybe you can see the opportunity here. Very economic, and very pregnant, host Mary Childs did. Which is why she went benefits shopping around the world. Between Sweden, Singapore, South Korea, Estonia, and Canada, who will offer her the best deal for her pregnancy?

    Help support Planet Money and get bonus episodes by subscribing to Planet Money+ in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org/planetmoney.

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    • 29 min
    The secret world behind school fundraisers

    The secret world behind school fundraisers

    Fundraising is a staple of the school experience in the U.S. There's an assembly showing off all the prizes kids can win by selling enough wrapping paper or chocolate to their neighbors. But it's pretty weird, right?

    Why do schools turn kids into little salespeople? And why do we let companies come in and dangle prizes in front of students?

    We spend a year with one elementary school, following their fundraising efforts, to see how much they raise, and what the money goes to.

    The school – Villacorta Elementary in La Puente, California – has one big goal: To raise enough money to send every single student on one field trip. The whole school hasn't been able to go on one in three years.

    We find out what the companies who run school fundraisers do to try to win a school's business. And we find that this bizarre tradition is ... surprisingly tactical. That's on today's episode.

    Today's show was hosted by Sarah Gonzalez and produced by Sam Yellowhorse Kesler. It was edited by Jess Jiang, fact checked by Sierra Juarez, and engineered by Valentina Rodríguez Sánchez. Alex Goldmark is Planet Money's executive producer.

    Help support Planet Money and get bonus episodes by subscribing to Planet Money+ in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org/planetmoney.

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    • 27 min
    A controversial idea at the heart of Bidenomics

    A controversial idea at the heart of Bidenomics

    Réka Juhász is a professor of economics at the University of British Columbia, and she studies what's known as industrial policy.

    That's the general term for whenever the government tries to promote specific sectors of the economy. The idea is that they might be able to supercharge growth by giving money to certain kinds of businesses, or by putting up trade barriers to protect certain industries. Economists have long been against it. Industrial policy has been called a "taboo" subject, and "one of the most toxic phrases" in economics. The mainstream view has been that industrial policy is inefficient, even harmful.

    For a long time, politicians largely accepted that view. But in the past several years, countries have started to embrace industrial policy—most notably in the United States. Under President Biden, the U.S. is set to spend hundreds of billions of dollars on industrial policy, to fund things like microchip manufacturing and clean energy projects. It's one of the most ambitious tests of industrial policy in U.S. history. And the billion dollar question is ... will it work?

    On today's show, Réka takes us on a fun, nerdy journey to explain the theory behind industrial policy, why it's so controversial, and where President Biden's big experiment might be headed.

    Help support Planet Money and get bonus episodes by subscribing to Planet Money+ in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org/planetmoney.

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    • 25 min
    Two Indicators: Economics of the defense industry

    Two Indicators: Economics of the defense industry

    The Department of Defense's proposed budget for 2024 is $842 billion. That is about 3.5% of the U.S.'s GDP. The military buys everything from pens and paper clips to fighter jets and submarines. But the market for military equipment is very different from the commercial market.

    On today's episode, we're bringing you two stories from The Indicator's series on defense spending that explore that market. As the U.S. continues to send weapons to Ukraine and Israel, we first look at why defense costs are getting so high. Then, we dive into whether bare-bones manufacturing styles are leaving the U.S. military in a bind.

    The original Indicator episodes were produced by Cooper Katz McKim with engineering from Maggie Luthar and James Willetts. It was fact-checked by Sierra Juarez and Angel Carreras. They were edited by Kate Concannon and Paddy Hirsch. Alex Goldmark is Planet Money's executive producer.

    Help support Planet Money and get bonus episodes by subscribing to Planet Money+ in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org/planetmoney.

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    • 19 min
    Extended Play: Al Roth on money and 'repugnant markets' (Planet Money+)

    Extended Play: Al Roth on money and 'repugnant markets' (Planet Money+)

    Repugnant markets. We heard about them from economist Al Roth in a recent Planet Money episode. These are markets that aren't allowed because people feel icky about putting a price on something. For example, it's basically illegal to buy and sell kidneys in much of the world. In today's bonus episode, Mary Childs talks with Al about other repugnant markets that didn't make it into the original show, like surrogacy and blood plasma. They also discuss how money can change relationships.You can hear that original Planet Money episode here:https://www.npr.org/1197956769Show your support for Planet Money and the reporting we do by subscribing to Planet Money+ in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. You'll be able to unlock this episode and other great bonus content. Regular episodes remain free to listen! Email the show at planetmoney@npr.org.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
28.8K Ratings

28.8K Ratings

Elmato2020 ,

Generally good show besides biases

Planet Money is a good show besides the occasional bias. It really makes economics fun to learn and simple to understand, its funny and generally entertaining to a wide variety of people, I hope some people behind these negative reviews take a second opinion.

Whathefungus ,

Easy to digest, factual and fun

One of the best shows out there! I have been so impressed by there ability to take certain experiments and concepts into the real world. What they did with a defunct superhero and Planet Money Records stand out on that front. Give it a try and you’ll find some info that really applies to your life!

Skheir11 ,

Supports genocide

In the latest episode, they mentioned Israel “defending itself” from Hamas. This is support of the genocide of the Palestinian people. I did love listening to Planet Money but I can no longer support them.

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