6 episodes

News, articles, interviews, events and courses, from the Plato's Academy Centre. Hosted on Substack and available from Google and Apple Podcasts.

platosacademycentre.substack.com

Plato's Academy Centre Podcast The Plato's Academy Centre

    • History
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

News, articles, interviews, events and courses, from the Plato's Academy Centre. Hosted on Substack and available from Google and Apple Podcasts.

platosacademycentre.substack.com

    🎧Nancy Sherman: Courageous Defiance

    🎧Nancy Sherman: Courageous Defiance

    This episode features Nancy Sherman, distinguished university professor and professor of philosophy at Georgetown University. She was also the inaugural Distinguished Chair in Ethics at the United States Naval Academy. Prof. Sherman is the author of several books including Stoic Wisdom: Ancient Lessons for Modern Resilience and Stoic Warriors, The Untold War.
    Thanks for reading Plato's Academy Centre Newsletter! Subscribe for free to receive new posts and support our work.

    Highlights
    * How Aristotle defines courage
    * Courageous leaders must defy norms
    * The story of Army Major Ian Fishback, whose documenting and protest of systematic torture led to the US amendment that banned the practice
    * The story of Susan L. Solomon who co-founded the New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) after her son was diagnosed with Type I Diabetes.
    See our EventBrite profile page for details of forthcoming events.
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    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit platosacademycentre.substack.com

    • 15 min
    🎧 Mick Mulroy: Lead Like a Spartan

    🎧 Mick Mulroy: Lead Like a Spartan

    This episode features Mick Mulroy, co-founder of Lobo Institute, former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, retired CIA Paramilitary Officer and U.S. Marine, ABC News Analyst, and MEI Fellow.
    Mick will be featured at our March 11th event, Stoicism and Politics.
    Highlights
    * A revisit to Lycurgus’ leadership
    * His direction influenced the establishment of American democracy
    * Hoplite training began at 7 years of age, endurance and resilience training
    * Women had more rights in Sparta under Lycurgus’ leadership than anywhere in the world at that time
    See our EventBrite profile page for details of forthcoming events.
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    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit platosacademycentre.substack.com

    • 14 min
    Who was Socrates?

    Who was Socrates?

    This episode is part of the Plato’s Academy Centre course on the Socratic Method. In this lesson, we will be learning who Socrates was, and why he became famous. We’ll also begin looking at the origins of the Socratic Method, and the role it played in his philosophy.
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    There is no greater evil one can suffer than to hate reasonable discourse. – Socrates in Plato's Phaedo, 89d
    There is an optional Facebook Live video of this lesson. NB: You do not need a Facebook account to watch the video but if you want to log in and follow our page, we'd appreciate that.
    Asked whether any man was wiser than Socrates, Apollo replied through his priestess, the Pythia, declaring: Of all living men, Socrates is the most wise.

    Socrates of Athens
    Let's begin with a brief introduction to Socrates, the quintessential Athenian philosopher. Socrates left behind no writings. We know of him primarily through the Dialogues of Plato, his most celebrated student, which portray Socrates discussing philosophy with various acquaintances. Plato's earlier dialogues are believed to be more faithful depictions of his teacher, whereas in those he wrote later he often put his own doctrines into the mouth of Socrates.
    Plato is not our only source, however. We also have many Socratic dialogues by Xenophon, a good friend of Socrates who became a famous military general. We even have a satirical depiction of Socrates in the comedies of Aristophanes, particularly The Clouds. There are also many references to him in other ancient sources, although often of uncertain reliability. For example, in Diogenes Laertius' Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers, Socrates is described as "the first who discoursed on the conduct of life, and the first philosopher who was tried and put to death."
    Socrates and the Delphic Oracle
    The key details of his life are as follows. Socrates was born in the early 5th century BC. His father was a stonemason or sculptor, and his mother was a midwife. He distinguished himself during his military service in the Peloponnesian War, when Athens and her allies fought against Sparta and hers. Although by no means wealthy, with the support of his friends, Socrates was eventually able to leave his stonemason's workshop and dedicate the rest of his life to the study of philosophy.
    At some point, probably when Socrates was approaching midlife, his childhood friend, Chaerephon, journeyed from Athens to the Temple of Apollo in nearby Delphi, to put a question to the Oracle. Asked whether any man was wiser than Socrates, Apollo replied through his priestess, the Pythia, declaring: Of all living men, Socrates is the most wise. Socrates claimed that he was shocked by this. He set about questioning everyone he met, from all walks of life, in order to put the god's assertion to the test and establish the true nature of wisdom.
    The Socratic Method
    Greek philosophers who came before him, such as Pythagoras and Anaxagoras, had speculated on the nature of the cosmos and laid down moral dogmas for their students. Socrates, however, became famous for his trademark "question and answer" method. It was designed to cure himself and others of a sort of intellectual conceit: the belief that one knows something that one does not know, such as what is good, or what is virtuous.
    It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so. — Mark Twain?
    Although that quote is widely attributed to Mark Twain, there’s no evidence, ironically, that he ever said it — perhaps it just ain’t so. Nevertheless, the point it makes is similar to Socrates’ point about the dangers of intellectual conceit.
    Casting himself more in the role of great student than great teacher, Socrates began by denying that he actually knew much of importance. This, however, was widely viewed as a stratagem, known as "So

    • 7 min
    Eugenia Manolidou: Disrupting Me Stoically

    Eugenia Manolidou: Disrupting Me Stoically

    This episode features Eugenia Manolidou, Head of Studies at Elliniki Agogi, School of Ancient Greek. This is an audio excerpt from Eugenia’s talk titled "Disrupting me Stoically" at the Plato’s Academy Centre virtual conference “Ancient Philosophy for Modern Leadership”.
    Highlights
    * How Eugenia became interested in the practical value of philosophy
    * How Plutarch’s On Tranquillity of Mind helped her
    * The Greek concept of euthymia in Seneca’s On Tranquillity
    * Christianity and Stoicism
    * Why “successful” people are sometimes still unfulfilled at the end of their lives
    * Taking charge of Elliniki Agogi — adopting a new perspective on teaching Greek
    * What it means to “Stoically disrupt” and reinvent oneself
    See our EventBrite profile page for details of forthcoming events:
    https://platosacademy.eventbrite.com
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    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit platosacademycentre.substack.com

    • 9 min
    Donald Robertson: "Socrates on Leadership and Self-Discipline"

    Donald Robertson: "Socrates on Leadership and Self-Discipline"

    This episode features, , author of How to Think Like a Roman Emperor, and the founder and president of the Plato’s Academy Centre. This is an audio excerpt from Donald’s talk titled "Socrates on Leadership and Self-Discipline" at the Plato’s Academy Centre virtual conference “Ancient Philosophy for Modern Leadership”.
    Thanks for reading Plato's Academy Centre Newsletter! Subscribe for free to receive new posts and support my work.

    Highlights
    * Socrates’ involvement with Athenian politics
    * What Socrates says about the importance of self-discipline in politics
    * Why wisdom is worthless without self-control
    * The risks of leaders who lack self-discipline
    Thank you for reading Plato's Academy Centre Newsletter. This post is public so feel free to share it.




    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit platosacademycentre.substack.com

    • 11 min
    How to Learn the Socratic Method

    How to Learn the Socratic Method

    In this podcast, Donald describes a simple method for learning, or teaching, the Socratic Method, originally used by Socrates, with lots of examples.
    * How the two-column technique is used in cognitive therapy today
    * The original two-column method used by Socrates
    * What Socrates actually said, excerpt from Xenophon’s Memorabilia Socratis
    * Example of similar technique used centuries later by a Stoic teacher
    * Epictetus seems to describe Socrates doing written exercises in a private notebook
    Here’s the link to the original article, which contains a detailed description of a modified version of this exercise, for use in modern-day workshops.
    Thanks for reading Plato's Academy Centre Newsletter! Subscribe for free to receive new posts and support my work.

    Thank you for reading Plato's Academy Centre Newsletter. This post is public so feel free to share it.




    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit platosacademycentre.substack.com

    • 14 min

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