49 episodes

I'm Dr. Z., a clinical psychologist and an author. In PLAYING-IT-SAFE I will share with you research based-skills, interviews, readings, insights, tips, and all types of curated info to get unstuck from worries, anxieties, fears, obsessions, and ineffective playing-it-safe actions. 
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PLAYING-IT-SAFE Dr. Z. - Patricia Zurita Ona, Psy.D.

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 90 Ratings

I'm Dr. Z., a clinical psychologist and an author. In PLAYING-IT-SAFE I will share with you research based-skills, interviews, readings, insights, tips, and all types of curated info to get unstuck from worries, anxieties, fears, obsessions, and ineffective playing-it-safe actions. 
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    49. Dr. Z. and David Barlow, Ph.D. (part 2)

    49. Dr. Z. and David Barlow, Ph.D. (part 2)

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a form of Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT). 
    Cognitive Behavior Therapy traditionally has been focused on delivering specific treatment protocols for specific struggles; for instance, if you were dealing with fears of public speaking as we see in social anxiety, then there was a treatment protocol for you to get better or sometimes five different treatment protocols that you could choose from, based on the clinician you worked with If you were dealing with panic attacks, there was a specific treatment protocol for it. 
    However, since 2000 Cognitive Behavior Therapy has moved from having a single protocol for a specific disorder - social anxiety, panic, etc- to have a unified protocol for multiple struggles because, in the case of anxiety, for example, it’s much more common to struggle with different types of fears than a single one. So if you’re dealing with attacks it’s also possible that you're dealing with chronic worry, or if you’re dealing with chronic worry it’s also possible that you’re struggling with fears of public speaking. Today I have a chance to speak with Dr. David Barlow, the developer of the Unified Protocol.
    In this conversation, you will hear 

    The basics of a Unified protocol in cognitive Behavior TherapyWhat is avoidance and how it worksWhat’s negative affect and how it worksWhat’s neuroticism and how it worksWhy is important to understand emotionsWhat are temperamental personality factors
    You will also hear me asking Dr. Barlow for permission to be sassy and ask controversial questions.
    What’s a process in behavior therapy?
    Is process-based therapy different from the unified protocol?
    What is a transdiagnostic process: is an intervention different than a process? Is a transdiagnostic process a way in which people cope with internal experiences?
    Tune in, you don't want to miss how cognitive behaviorists are thinking of therapy these days and how this informs your experience in therapy or coaching when dealing with fear-based struggles.
    About Dr. Barlow
    Dr. Barlow received his Ph.D. from the University of Vermont and has published over 650 articles and chapters and over 90 books and clinical manuals, mostly in the areas of anxiety and related emotional disorders and clinical research methodology. He is formerly a Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Mississippi Medical Center and a Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology at Brown University.
    Dr. Barlow was also a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University at Albany, State University of New York, and Director of the Phobia and Anxiety Disorders Clinic at the University at Albany, SUNY.

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    • 32 min
    48. Dr. Z. and David Barlow, Ph.D. (part 1)

    48. Dr. Z. and David Barlow, Ph.D. (part 1)

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a form of Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT). 
    Cognitive Behavior Therapy traditionally has been focused on delivering specific treatment protocols for specific struggles; for instance, if you were dealing with fears of public speaking as we see in social anxiety, then there was a treatment protocol for you to get better or sometimes five different treatment protocols that you could choose from, based on the clinician you worked with If you were dealing with panic attacks, there was a specific treatment protocol for it. 
    However, since 2000 Cognitive Behavior Therapy has moved from having a single protocol for a specific disorder - social anxiety, panic, etc- to have a unified protocol for multiple struggles because, in the case of anxiety, for example, it’s much more common to struggle with different types of fears than a single one. So if you’re dealing with attacks it’s also possible that you're dealing with chronic worry, or if you’re dealing with chronic worry it’s also possible that you’re struggling with fears of public speaking. Today I have a chance to speak with Dr. David Barlow, the developer of the Unified Protocol.
    In this conversation, part 1, you will hear 

    The basics of a Unified protocol in cognitive Behavior TherapyWhat is avoidance and how it worksWhat’s negative affect and how it worksWhat’s neuroticism and how it worksWhy is important to understand emotionsWhat are temperamental personality factors
    You will also hear me asking Dr. Barlow for permission to be sassy and ask controversial questions.
    What’s a process in behavior therapy?
    Is process-based therapy different from the unified protocol?
    What is a transdiagnostic process: is an intervention different than a process? Is a transdiagnostic process a way in which people cope with internal experiences?
    Tune in, you don't want to miss how cognitive behaviorists are thinking of therapy these days and how this informs your experience in therapy or coaching when dealing with fear-based struggles.
    About Dr. Barlow
    Dr. Barlow received his Ph.D. from the University of Vermont and has published over 650 articles and chapters and over 90 books and clinical manuals, mostly in the areas of anxiety and related emotional disorders and clinical research methodology. He is formerly a Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Mississippi Medical Center and a Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology at Brown University.
    Dr. Barlow was also a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University at Albany, State University of New York, and Director of the Phobia and Anxiety Disorders Clinic at the University at Albany, SUNY.

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    • 30 min
    47. Dr. Z on loneliness

    47. Dr. Z on loneliness

    How to cultivate loneliness & why it is important to do so:
    Most people are uncomfortable with loneliness because it means facing yourself without distractions. 
    But, as much as you don’t like it, you can learn from it and perhaps even cultivate it.
    Sometimes, without realizing and other times, intentionally. We do all types of things to avoid feeling lonely and to manage our sense of loneliness.. 
    But, how do those strategies work in our life? And if they’re not working, what can you do about it…that’s what this episode is about!
    In this episode, you will be invited to:

    Reflect on how you handle lonelinessYour playing-it-safe moves when feeling alone How to cultivate loneliness without losing yourself
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    • 13 min
    46. Dr. Z and Oliver Burkeman (part 2)

    46. Dr. Z and Oliver Burkeman (part 2)

    “The average human lifespan is absurd, terrifying, insultingly short. But that isn’t a reason for unremitting despair or for living in an anxiety-fueled panic about making the most of your limited time. It’s a cause for relief. You get to give up on something that was always impossible - the quest to become the optimized, infinitely capable, emotionally, invincible, fully independent person you’re officially supposed to be. Then you get to roll up your sleeves and start work on that’s gloriously possible instead.” 
    In the information era, it’s natural that everyone talks about productivity and how to do things. But Oliver Burkeman has a different take: “actually, you can’t do anything and you need to come to terms with that…” 
    In this second part of my conversation with Oliver Burkeman, we discussed:

    How Oliver manages his worries, fears, and anxietiesHow Oliver manages negative thoughts What bothers him about self-psychologyWhat emotions are His thoughts on the notion of work-life balance
    This conversation with Oliver reminds me of the preciousness of being alive and that, we’re all in the process of learning and re-learning what works in life!
    Hope you enjoy the episode!!!

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    • 22 min
    45. Dr. Z and Oliver Burkeman (part 1)

    45. Dr. Z and Oliver Burkeman (part 1)

    It was an honor to chat with Oliver Burkeman, columnist for the Guardian, journalist by training, and author of the books: “4000 weeks: time management for mortals and happiness: the antidote for people who can’t stand positive thinking.”
    I have been following Oliver’s work for years and had so many questions to ask him, but of course, there were time constraints. So I did my best to ask him about his writing process and the story behind his books, how he practices acceptance, gratitude, and other psychological processes, and his take on some sassy comments he has made over the years.
    If you haven’t read Oliver’s books, I highly recommend them! He’s one of those writers that do a fantastic job sharing science in a story format, and he does it so elegantly that after you read either a chapter he wrote or his column in the Guardian, you want to read more.
    This conversation has 3 segments:

    Oliver’s writing process and how he handles interruptions, self-criticism, time anxiety, and comparison thoughts related to writing.How Oliver experiences gratitude, acceptance, and approaches day-to-day challenges.Oliver’s take on different topics: the problem with self-help books, what emotions are, the difference between meaning and happiness
    And if you listen to the end, you will hear who Oliver would like to have a scotch and cigar with!
    As I finish writing this conversation, I remind myself of the last paragraph in Oliver’s book, The Four Thousand Weeks:
    “The average human lifespan is absurd, terrifying, insultingly short. But that isn’t a reason for unremitting despair or for living in an anxiety-fueled panic about making the most of your limited time. It’s a cause for relief. You get to give up on something that was always impossible - the quest to become the optimized, infinitely capable, emotionally, invincible, fully independent person you’re officially supposed to be. Then you get to roll up your sleeves and start work on something that’s gloriously possible instead.” 

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    • 29 min
    44. How do you play-it-safe?

    44. How do you play-it-safe?

    Are you getting in the way of your own best life?
    one of the ways in which many of us get in the way of our best life is by playing it safe
    You might be playing it safe if you ...
    - Get stuck thinking doom and gloom scenarios
    - Ask others what to do so you don’t make a mistake
    - Feel like an imposter despite all your accomplishments
    - Doubt your competency and ability to handle challenging situations
    - Spontaneously go back to the past and dwell on troublesome situations
    - Avoid situations or people that make you feel uncomfortable even though it causes you problems
    - Put off an activity when it’s too overwhelming but beat yourself up because you’re not getting it done
    - Are overly careful about what you’re saying, how you’re saying it, and what you’re doing so you don’t make mistakes
    - Do your best to think optimistically and positively even though your mind keeps coming up with negative thoughts
    Your playing-it-safe moves might feel right at the time, but they can also keep you stuck.
    Do you know what's your playing-it-safe profile?
    Learn which playing-it-safe moves are working against you and how to change them. 
    Here is what you need to do:
    (1) Listen to this episode
    (2) Take the Playing-It-Safe Questionnaire
    (3) Figure out your Playing-it-safe profile.
    https://www.thisisdoctorz.com/playing-it-safe-questionnaire/
    Do you feel as if you're the only person responsible for others' wellbeing at all times? How do you go about making decisions?⁣ ⁣ What about small ones?⁣ ⁣ Do you get overwhelmed with the possibility of failure? Do you spend hours criticizing yourself? Is it challenging to say present in the moment?⁣ ⁣ Do you postpone activities that feel anxiety-provoking? Do you have high standards for yourself? Do you put pressure on yourself to make the right decisions? Do you minimize your accomplishments and feel that what you're doing is not enough?
    These are characteristics of perfectionism and high achieving behaviors. Get a 10-part audio guide to learn to harness the power of perfectionism and learn to do things that your care about without losing yourself!
    Click here: https://www.thisisdoctorz.com/act-for-perfectionism-and-high-achieving-behaviors/

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    • 23 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
90 Ratings

90 Ratings

Dr. Lilly Kaner Yamamoto ,

A must listen!

I recommend Dr. Z’s podcast and books to my clients all the time. She is compassionate and up-to-date on the scientific advances in psychology. Importantly, she breaks down the change process with care and in such a way that we can roll up our sleeves and get to work immediately. Highly recommend her work!!

Charlotte789_ ,

Love the show

Thanks for the great podcast.

Catherine_990 ,

Great podcast

Very informative and provides fun facts.

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