136 episodes

Discussing news and innovations in the Middle East.

POMEPS Middle East Political Science Podcas‪t‬ Marc Lynch

    • Education
    • 4.5 • 11 Ratings

Discussing news and innovations in the Middle East.

    Violence & Restraint, Humanitarian Challenges, & Negotiating Identity (S. 10, Ep. 9)

    Violence & Restraint, Humanitarian Challenges, & Negotiating Identity (S. 10, Ep. 9)

    Devorah Manekin of Hebrew University of Jerusalem talks about her latest book, Regular Soldiers, Irregular War: Violence and Restraint in the Second Intifada, with Marc Lynch on this week's podcast. The book presents a theoretical framework for understanding the various forms of behavior in which soldiers engage during counterinsurgency campaigns—compliance and shirking, abuse and restraint, as well as the creation of new violent practices. (Starts at 32:41). Jeannie Sowers of University of Hampshire and Erika Weinthal of Duke University speak about their new article entitled, "Humanitarian challenges and the targeting of civilian infrastructure in the Yemen war," published in International Affairs. (Starts at 0:54). Joshua Freedman of Oberlin College discusses his new article, "The Recognition Dilemma: Negotiating Identity in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict," published in International Studies Quarterly. (Starts at 18:17).

    Music for this season's podcast was created by Feras Arrabi. You can find more of his work on his Facebook and Instagram page.

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Muslim Brotherhood in Syria, Women in Legislative Committees, and On Their Own (S. 10, Ep. 8)

    Muslim Brotherhood in Syria, Women in Legislative Committees, and On Their Own (S. 10, Ep. 8)

    Dara Conduit of Deakin University talks about her book, The Muslim Brotherhood in Syria, with Marc Lynch on this week's podcast. The book explores the Muslim Brotherhood's history to understand why it failed to capitalize on its advantage as the most prominent opposition group in Syria as the conflict unfolded, addressing significant gaps in accounts of the group's past to assess whether its reputation for violence and dogmatism is justified. (Starts at 29:05). Marwa Shalaby of the University of Wisconsin joins to talk about her article, "Women in Legislative Committees in Arab Parliaments" (co-authored by Leila Elimam), published in Comparative Politics. (Starts at 0:47). Bozena Welborne of Smith College discusses her article, "On Their Own? Women Running as Independent Candidates in the Middle East," published in Middle East Law and Governance. (Starts at 15:35). 


    Music for this season's podcast was created by Feras Arrabi. You can find more of his work on his Facebook and Instagram page.

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Political Economies of MENA & Politics of Teaching IR in the Arab World (S. 10, Ep. 7)

    Political Economies of MENA & Politics of Teaching IR in the Arab World (S. 10, Ep. 7)

    Robert Springborg of the Naval Postgraduate School talks about his latest book, Political Economies of the Middle East and North Africa, with Marc Lynch on this week's podcast. In the book, he discusses the economic future of the [MENA] region by examining the national and regional political causes of its contemporary underperformance.  (Starts at 37:19). May Darwich of the University of Birmingham, Waleed Hazbun of University of Alabama, Adham Saouli of University of St. Andrews, and Karim Makdisi of the American University of Beirut speak about their new collection of essays entitled, "The Politics of Teaching International Relations in the Arab World: Reading Walt in Beirut, Wendt in Doha, and Abul-Fadl in Cairo," published in International Studies Perspectives. The collection also includes pieces by Morten Valbjorn of Aarhus University, Bassel Salloukh of the Lebanese American University, Amira Abu Samra of Cairo University, Said Saddiki of University of Sidi Mohammed Ben Abdellah, and Hamad Albloshi of Kuwait University. (Starts at 0:55).

    Music for this season's podcast was created by Feras Arrabi. You can find more of his work on his Facebook and Instagram page.

    • 1 hr 6 min
    Trust & the Islamic Advantage, Attitudes Towards Migrants, & On-Side Fighting (S. 10, Ep. 6)

    Trust & the Islamic Advantage, Attitudes Towards Migrants, & On-Side Fighting (S. 10, Ep. 6)

    Avital Livny of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne talks about her latest book, Trust and the Islamic Advantage: Religious-Based Movements in Turkey and the Muslim World, with Marc Lynch on this week's podcast.  The book shows that the Islamic advantage is rooted in feelings of trust among individuals with a shared, religious group-identity, and presents a new argument for conceptualizing religion as both a personal belief system and collective identity. (Starts at 27:01). Ala' Alrababa'h discusses the article, Attitudes Toward Migrants in a Highly Impacted Economy: Evidence From the Syrian Refugee Crisis in Jordan (co-authored by Andrea Dillon, Scott Williamson, Jens Hainmueller, Dominik Hangartner, Jeremy M. Weinstein) published in Comparative Political Studies. (Starts at 0:58). Jonah Schulhofer-Wohl of Leiden University talks about his article, On-Side fighting in civil war: The logic of mortal alignment in Syria, published in the Rationality and Society journal. (Starts at 12:58).


    Music for this season's podcast was created by Feras Arrabi. You can find more of his work on his Facebook and Instagram page.

    • 53 min
    Global Jihad, Precarious Collective Action, and Practical Ideology (S. 10, Ep. 5)

    Global Jihad, Precarious Collective Action, and Practical Ideology (S. 10, Ep. 5)

    Glenn Robinson of the Naval Postgraduate School talks about his latest book, Global Jihad: A Brief History, with Marc Lynch on this week's podcast. The book tells the story of four distinct jihadi waves, each with its own program for achieving a global end: whether a Jihadi International to liberate Muslim lands from foreign occupation; al-Qa'ida's call to drive the United States out of the Muslim world; ISIS using "jihadi cool" to recruit followers; or leaderless efforts of stochastic terror to "keep the dream alive." (Starts at 24:22). Dina Bishara of Cornell University discusses her new article, "Precarious Collective Action: Unemployed Graduates Associations in the Middle East and North Africa." (Starts at 0:50). Sarah Parkinson of Johns Hopkins University talks about "Practical Ideology in Militant Organizations." (Starts at 10:17).

    Music for this season's podcast was created by Feras Arrabi. You can find more of his work on his Facebook and Instagram page.

    • 54 min
    Morocco Special Focus: Islamism, Language Politics, Policing the Organizational Threat(S. 10, Ep. 4)

    Morocco Special Focus: Islamism, Language Politics, Policing the Organizational Threat(S. 10, Ep. 4)

    Ahmed Khanani of Earlham College talks about his latest book, All Politics are God’s Politics: Moroccan Islamism and the Sacralization of Democracy, with Marc Lynch on this week's podcast. The book enables readers to understand and appreciate the significance of dimuqrāṭiyya [democracy] as a concept alongside new prospects for Islam and democracy in the Arab Middle East and North Africa (MENA) (Starts at 22:49). Kaoutar Ghilani of Oxford University speaks about her new article, "The legitimate’ after the uprisings: justice, equity, and language politics in Morocco," published in the British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies. (Starts at 0:56). Chantal Berman of Georgetown University discusses her new article, "Policing the Organizational Threat in Morocco: Protest and Public Violence in Liberal Autocracies," published in the American Journal of Political Science. (Starts at 11:41).

    Music for this season's podcast was created by Feras Arrabi. You can find more of his work on his Facebook and Instagram page.

    • 51 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
11 Ratings

11 Ratings

WinstonDA ,

Excellent source

For those looking beyond headlines about news in the Middle East, this podcast is a must. These conversations provide excellent analysis and astute context to the challenges and opportunities facing the region, and those who study it, today.

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