6 episodes

Weekly Industry Insights for WordPress Pros

Press the Issue MasterWP

    • Technology
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

Weekly Industry Insights for WordPress Pros

    How Did the Pandemic Affect WordPress Contributors?

    How Did the Pandemic Affect WordPress Contributors?

    Contributors are the life blood of open source projects, and WordPress is no different. When the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic made it difficult for people to contribute, how was the project affected? How and where did our structures and processes change and evolve to match this challenge?



    Press the Issue was sponsored by LearnDash. Your expertise makes you money doing what you do. Now let it make you money teaching what you do. Create a course with LearnDash. Visit LearnDash.com.



    Press the Issue was also sponsored by Weglot. Discover a way to translate your WordPress site that’s easy to install, compatible with all themes and plugins, implements multilingual SEO, and translates your site with machine translation (with full post-editing control). Learn more at Weglot.com.



    Press the Issue was also sponsored by Cloudways. Cloudways managed hosting ensures that your sites get the performance boost they deserve. It offers you fast speeds, uptime, and managed security at affordable rates. Learn more at Cloudways.com



    Press the Issue is a production of MasterWP. It was produced by Allie Nimmons. It was hosted and edited by Monet Davenport and mixed and mastered by Teron Bullock. Please visit masterwp.com/presstheissue to find more episodes. Subscribe to our newsletter for more WordPress news at masterwp.com. 



    Resources mentioned:



    2020 Timeline: The Year Of The Covid Pandemic The Impact of COVID 19 on Volunteering Civic Engagement Research Report Helping Others, Helping OurselvesHow the open source community came together to fight COVID-19Collaboration and Conflict Resolution in Global Open Source Communities w/ Andrea Middleton



    Special thanks to:



    Allyson SouzaAndrea MiddletonBrian CoordsCami KaosDavid BissetDavid SpinksDavid WolfpawIan SvbodaMarieke van de Rakt



    Episode Transcript:




    Monet Davenport:
    Welcome to Press The Issue, a podcast from MasterWP, your source for industry insights for WordPress professionals. Get show notes, transcripts, and more information about the show at masterwp.com/presstheissue.



    Allie Nimmons:
    By 2020, Allyson Souza had been working with WordPress community events, word camps, and meetups, for about 5 years. In early 2020, they were excitedly planning the third WordCamp São Paulo. They had high hopes. The last two WordCamps in Sao Palo were pretty successful. They had around 700 attendees in 2019, they had begun a kids' workshop, and they were focused on boosting diversity and getting more speakers.



    Allyson Souza:
    I enjoy being around people that share my visions about free software, publishing, democratization, and part of me really like to see people at our events, being able to get knowledge and make connections, and even sometimes find a job or freelance. It's very satisfying.



    Allie Nimmons:
    Then, 2020 happened.



    News Clips:
    ... High alert, screening passengers for symptoms of a deadly new virus. But first, though we know now it's possible the virus could have been spreading as early as December 2019, by the time the White House partially banned travel from China, infection levels start to explode all over the world.



    Allie Nimmons:
    So, a lot changed for Allyson, and they could feel their WordPress community change around them too.



    Allyson Souza:
    Everybody was tense. I felt that everyone was tired, afraid to be sick, and afraid for their families. I was feeling that too. After the pandemic started, our agency moved to home offices a week before the government recommendations, because we saw the news and how things were evolving in other countries. My mental and physical health started to drop. With everything that was happening, the community involvement started to feel more like a duty than something I was happy doing.



    Allie Nimmons:
    Allyson is definitely not the only person to experience this kind of a shift, and he's definitely not the only person to stop volunteering as a WordPress open-source contributor during the pa

    • 51 min
    Virtual Meetups – Are They Here to Stay?

    Virtual Meetups – Are They Here to Stay?

    As the pandemic moved in, in-person events moved out. As a result, WordPress meetups became 100% virtual, for better or for worse. As things go back to normal, are virtual meetups here to stay? Today Teron Bullock and Nyasha Green are here to figure it out.



    This podcast was sponsored by LearnDash. Your expertise makes you money doing what you do. Now let it make you money teaching what you do. Create a course with LearnDash. Visit LearnDash.com.



    Press the Issue is a production of MasterWP. It was produced by Allie Nimmons. It was hosted and edited by Monet Davenport and mixed and mastered by Teron Bullock. Please visit masterwp.com/presstheissue to find more episodes. Subscribe to our newsletter for more WordPress news at masterwp.com.



    Episode Transcript:



    Monet Davenport:
    Welcome to Press The Issue, a podcast for MasterWP, your source for industry insights for WordPress professionals. Get show notes, transcripts, and more information about the show at masterwp.com/presstheissue.



    Monet Davenport:
    As the pandemic moved, in person events moved out. As a result, WordPress meetups became 100% virtual, for better or for worse. As things go back to normal are virtual meetups here stay? Today Teron Bullock and Nyasha Green are here to figure it out.



    Teron Bullock:
    So how are you doing today Nyasha?



    Nyasha Green:
    I'm doing well, Teron. How are you?



    Teron Bullock:
    I'm awesome. I know today we have an exciting episode. We're going speak to meetups and how do we feel the future of meetups will be? And I just think it'll be an exciting conversation to have.



    Nyasha Green:
    Yeah, I'm very excited.



    Teron Bullock:
    So let's jump right into it. With the world getting into post pandemic phase, at least we hope. I'm pretty sure however the CDC and the world decides to handle COVID, it might be something that is here to stay, but we also have to figure out a way to continue to live life around it. And one of those things that we have to also think about is meetups. And during the pandemic meetups switched from being in person to being virtual. And now that we're in this era of figuring out how to live with the world being different now, how do we handle conferences going forward? Will the virtual conference be here to stay, or will we transition back into in person meetups?



    Nyasha Green:
    I think that's going to have a two part answer for me. Because I want to say, just answering that question is, should we go back to completely in person events? I think at some point, yes. But I think there always should be the option to have a virtual component of it. And the reason I think that is because COVID is a very unfortunate thing that's happened to the world, just the devastation, the loss. It's been a lot on everyone all over the world. One of the things it's brought out though is how much more accessible things are when we can do them virtually, whether that be tech conferences, working from home, meetups. So will companies want to go back to in person? I think of course they will. Will all lot do that? I think so as well. Should everybody go back and it just be no virtual conferences and just a hundred percent meetups? No, I don't think so. But I think that virtual conferences and meetups have worked so well that I think they're always going to be an option now, just seeing the sheer success of them. I think companies have noticed that and that they're going to work hard to make sure there's some type of virtual component to it going forward.



    Teron Bullock:
    And I happen to agree. I think that the virtual component to a meetup is very beneficial. Going to meetups in person, while I think that's also very beneficial, seeing somebody in person you can never replace that in person feeling. But I also think that, like you said, accessibility regardless of if it's financial or maybe it's location based. I just think that the virtual component is very necessary and it's definitely something that should

    • 25 min
    DeCode Conference

    DeCode Conference

    The DeCode 2022 conference just passed and it was nothing short of amazing. In this episode, Nyasha Green shares all the things she really loved about this virtual developer conference hosted with WP Engine.



    Check out the original article here: https://masterwp.com/decode-2022-is-how-you-put-on-a-tech-conference/



    This podcast was sponsored by LearnDash. Your expertise makes you money doing what you do. Now let it make you money teaching what you do. Create a course with LearnDash. Visit LearnDash.com.



    Press the Issue is a production of MasterWP. It was produced by Allie Nimmons. It was hosted and edited by Monet Davenport and mixed and mastered by Teron Bullock. Please visit masterwp.com/presstheissue to find more episodes. Subscribe to our newsletter for more WordPress news at masterwp.com. 



    Episode Transcript:




    Monet Davenport:
    Welcome to Press The Issue, a podcast for Master WP, your source for industry insights for WordPress professionals. Get show notes, transcripts, and more information about the show at masterwp.com/presstheissue. The DE{CODE} 2022 Conference just passed, and it was nothing short of amazing. In this episode, Nyasha Green shares all the things she really loved about this virtual developer conference hosted with WP Engine.



    Teron Bullock:
    How's it going, Nyasha?



    Nyasha Green:
    Hey, it's going well. How are you doing today?



    Teron Bullock:
    I'm well. So I know today we're going to talk about The DE{CODE} Conference. And you attended as well as writing an article, so that's going to be pretty exciting.



    Nyasha Green:
    Yeah.



    Teron Bullock:
    So for anybody that's listening that is not familiar with DE{CODE}, can you explain what it is?



    Nyasha Green:
    Yes. So DE{CODE} is a tech conference that the people behind WP Engine put on. And it was the first time having it in a little while due to COVID, and it was completely virtual. So they talked about all things WordPress, they had it in different time zones so it could reach the maximum amount of people. And they talked about the present, the past, and the future of WordPress in terms of updates, where we were in WordPress, where we are now, and where we're going. And it was just an excellent conference in terms of just the talks they had, the information they shared, the entertainment. They had a live DJ to keep people interested in what was going on. And then they just were so accepting of different sides of how people felt about the community. So it was really, really great to be a part of it, and it was just a very, very wonderful experience.



    Teron Bullock:
    I was able to tune in for the last maybe hour and a half to two hours. And from what I could see, it definitely was very entertaining. It was definitely something that I wish that I would see more in the universe, if I could say it that way. The conference to me, like I said having tuned in late, was spectacular. I loved it. I loved every minute of it. The DJ was, he definitely brought a different side to the conference that I've never seen before because a lot of times you go to... You watch these conferences or even if you go to them, let's be honest, we want the information, but it's kind of boring.



    Nyasha Green:
    Yeah.



    Teron Bullock:
    But the DJ was dancing. Even the DJ, I expect him just to play one record or play another, he's dancing. And it was just very entertaining.



    Nyasha Green:
    Yeah, it definitely kept people's attention. Normally when you go to an in-person conference you have outside rooms where you can kind of talk to people network, or you can kind of wonder outside. You pretty much got to find your own energy and find your own things to do in between conferences or in between panels. But it's like they understood we all would be home or working from a specific place.



    Nyasha Green:
    So the DJ just was the life of it, and kept bringing energy back to us. We would sit there and listen to this information. And then instead of just p

    • 17 min
    Are WordPress Developers Real Developers?

    Are WordPress Developers Real Developers?

    Are WordPress developers real developers? Your initial response may be... well of course they are. But this isn’t the universal opinion. Rob Howard and Nyasha Green want to get to the bottom of where this assumption comes form, and exactly why it’s false.



    Check out the original article here: https://masterwp.com/are-wordpress-developers-real-developers/



    This podcast was sponsored by LearnDash. Your expertise makes you money doing what you do. Now let it make you money teaching what you do. Create a course with LearnDash. Visit LearnDash.com.



    Press the Issue is a production of MasterWP. It was produced by Allie Nimmons. It was hosted and edited by Monet Davenport and mixed and mastered by Teron Bullock. Please visit masterwp.com/presstheissue to find more episodes. Subscribe to our newsletter for more WordPress news at masterwp.com.







    Episode Transcript:



    Monet Davenport:
    Welcome to Press the Issue, a podcast for Master WP, your source for industry insights for WordPress professionals. Get show notes, transcripts, and more information about the show at masterwp.com/presstheissue. Are WordPress developers real developers? Your initial response may be, "Well, of course they are," but this isn't the universal opinion. Rob Howard and Nyasha Green want to get to the bottom of where this assumption comes from and exactly why it's false.



    Rob Howard:
    Hi, Nyasha how's it going?



    Nyasha Green:
    Hey, Rob, it's going well.



    Rob Howard:
    Excellent. Well, today we're going to talk about an article you wrote a few weeks back about the fact that in the web development industry, WordPress developers are often perceived as quote, "Not real developers." Can you tell me about how this came up for you and kind of how you were inspired to write about this?



    Nyasha Green:
    Yes, so this is a conversation that's actually really recurring that I see on Twitter. A lot of developer outside of the WordPress community, they always take jabs, not always, but they take jabs from time to time on WordPress developers, if we really do truly develop, if we really do truly code, if we are worthy of the money we make, and things like that. It actually was something when I was first getting into tech that came up as well and it did play a part, a small role, in what I thought about WordPress when I was first learning. But luckily for me, I had some really good mentors who had been in the WordPress community for a really long time that were able to kind of clear the air and clear any misconceptions of things that people were spreading. So I thought it was very important to talk about that because I know a lot of people getting into tech don't have those mentors and they don't have those people to clear things up for them, so I wanted to write about it and try to help as many people as possible so it can get some fresh blood into the community.



    Rob Howard:
    Yeah because it sounds like, to some degree, I don't know if this is the intention necessarily of the people who are saying this stuff, maybe it's purely just an ego trip for the non-WordPress developers to talk about the WordPress developers in this way.



    Nyasha Green:
    Mm-hmm (affirmative).



    Rob Howard:
    But it sounds like to some degree at least, it has the effect or could have the effect of deterring people from learning PHP or WordPress in favor of some of the other languages or JavaScript frameworks that are out there. Have you actually seen people saying that and kind of reacting in that way?



    Nyasha Green:
    Yes, I actually have. When I first started, my internship was what got me into WordPress development, and when I was first offered it, I hate to admit this now, but I was a little scared because I had heard so many bad things about WordPress and the only knowledge I had was that's where we used to blog. I don't think it's bad, but if all these developers are telling me it's bad and they're developers, will I be a real developer? I was one of the people tha

    • 24 min
    Capitalizing the “P” in WordPress

    Capitalizing the “P” in WordPress

    What is your first thought when you see WordPress spelled without the capital P in the middle? You may be surprised how much opinions vary. In fact some people may care a little too much about that one little letter. Nyasha Green and Rob Howard have noticed a problem with this and want to explore what this one letter says about the WordPress community.



    Visit the original article here: https://masterwp.com/wordpress-with-a-lowercase-p-is-ok-with-me/ 



    This podcast was sponsored by LearnDash. Your expertise makes you money doing what you do. Now let it make you money teaching what you do. Create a course with LearnDash. Visit LearnDash.com.



    Press the Issue is a production of MasterWP. It was produced by Allie Nimmons. It was hosted and edited by Monet Davenport and mixed and mastered by Teron Bullock. Please visit masterwp.com/presstheissue to find more episodes. Subscribe to our newsletter for more WordPress news at masterwp.com 



     



    Episode Transcript:



    Monét Davenport:
    Welcome to Press the Issue, a podcast for Master WP, your source for industry insights for WordPress professionals.



    Get show notes, transcripts and more information about the show at masterwp.com/presstheissue.



    What is your first thought when you see WordPress spelled without the capital P in the middle? You may be surprised how much opinions vary. In fact, some people may care a little too much about that one little letter. Nyasha Green and Rob Howard have noticed a problem with this and want to explore what this one letter says about the WordPress community.



    Nyasha Green:
    Hey Rob, how are you doing today?



    Rob Howard:
    Hey, Nyasha. I'm great. How about you?



    Nyasha Green:
    Doing well. Doing well. So today I wanted to talk to you about an article you wrote. Your article was about, well, the title was WordPress With a Lowercase P Is Okay With Me. And you got a little bit of pushback on this article. So I just want to start by asking you what inspired you to write this?



    Rob Howard:
    Yeah. So I was reading about a company that had published basically their recommendations for developers who are applying for WordPress jobs. This is something I think a lot about, because I hire a lot of WordPress developers and I've developed a somewhat idiosyncratic or different system for doing it that I like to think works pretty well. But I was reading this because I was interested to see what other people are doing. And there were a few things that struck me in the article as being very different from how we do it. But the biggest thing that jumped out at me was that the author, who is a person who's hiring lots of WordPress developers, said, "if you don't write WordPress with an uppercase P, that is 'Word' is capitalized and then 'Press' is capitalized, then that person doesn't have a clue. It's something you could be shunned for. There's not much you could say in your defense."



    Rob Howard:
    So obviously the word choice around shunning, there's not much you could say in your defense, was a little bit off putting to me. But the bigger picture was, is this really something that it even makes sense to be looking for in a job interview or on a resume? And I wrote the article basically explaining why I take pretty much the exact opposite approach. I see the capital P in WordPress as, first of all, confusing from an English language standpoint, but also just so frivolous and meaningless that it essentially amounts to being like a secret handshake. If you know this thing is capitalized, then it's almost like, well, you're in the community. And that's even what the original author said is like, this is an indication that you are involved in the community already.



    Rob Howard:
    So there were people in the comments who said, "well, what if I want to hire a WordPress insider?" Okay, that's your prerogative. But when you're thinking about job applications, the stated goal should be to make your company as open as possible

    • 28 min
    Welcome to Press the Issue

    Welcome to Press the Issue

    Welcome to Press the Issue, a podcast from Master WP. In this show, we will be taking a look at questions, issues, and problems that face the WordPress community and ecosystem. In this new podcast, you can expect a fresh and unique approach to WordPress news. Our mini-episodes, dropping weekly, will feature candid discussions from our team as they explore questions from the Master WP newsletter. Once a month, look out for a full length episode which takes you on a deep dive into issues that affect WordPress, open-source, and beyond.

    Every week, Master WP publishes our newsletter to more than 40,000 WordPress pros, covering the latest industry news, opinion and analysis, plus links to the biggest WordPress stories from around the web. Join the conversation on Twitter, and now here, on Press this Issue.

    Learn more about the podcast at masterwp.com/presstheissue

    • 1 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
1 Rating

1 Rating

hollidaythorn ,

Great show

I’m excited for more episodes

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