71 episodes

A podcast about changing how we understand and talk about stuttering, one conversation at a time.

Proud Stutter Maya Chupkov

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9 • 69 Ratings

A podcast about changing how we understand and talk about stuttering, one conversation at a time.

    Preparing For A Presentation As A Person Who Stutters

    Preparing For A Presentation As A Person Who Stutters

    Hilary Utaegbulam is a Nigerian-born physics student and teacher who stutters. He recently gave his first ever public presentation on his research, which went extremely well.
    Hilary offers advice on preparing for public speaking and how to give a confident presentation as a person who stutters. He also talks about how he got through his first stuttering encounter at a conference and the mental and physical hurdles of stuttering, how it influenced his career choices, and the importance of seeking therapy and support.

    In this episode
    Hilary’s physics presentation
    ROCK OF HOPE film crowdfunding campaign. Support Maya and her team of stuttering filmmakers by making a pledge to the campaign today.
    If you'd like to support but just can't afford to support monetarily, you can:
    Click "Follow" on the campaign on Seed&Spark! This is almost as beneficial as pledging because once they hit 500 "followers," regardless of how many people pledge, they'll unlock creator discounts for this and future projects.Use this social media toolkit. It includes sample language for social media and an email template to share with your friends, family, and colleagues. 


    Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/proud-stutter/exclusive-content

    • 39 min
    Children’s Book Author Writes About Her Grandson’s Speech Journey

    Children’s Book Author Writes About Her Grandson’s Speech Journey

    Carol Labov is the author of “The Cave Boy Who Would Be President,” a children’s book inspired by her own experience with her grandson Cooper. Where did the idea of the book come from and why did she write it?
    This book is built on the love of a grandmother to her grandson and is meant to be helpful for other parents going through similar experiences.
    You can get a copy here.
    In this episode
    There still time to support the ROCK OF HOPE film crowdfunding campaign. Support Maya and her team of stuttering filmmakers by making a pledge to the campaign today. The filmmakers need to reach 80% of their goal or they get nothing. 
    If you'd like to support but just can't afford to support monetarily, you can:
    Click "Follow" on the campaign on Seed&Spark! This is almost as beneficial as pledging because once we hit 250 "followers," regardless of how many people pledge, they'll start unlocking creator discounts for this and future projects.Use this toolkit until the end of the campaign. It includes sample language for social media and an email template to share with your friends, family, and colleagues. 

    Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/proud-stutter/exclusive-content

    • 18 min
    How Motherhood Transformed This Attorney's Relationship With Her Stutter

    How Motherhood Transformed This Attorney's Relationship With Her Stutter

    This episode celebrates Mental Health Awareness Month and Stuttering Awareness Week. Casey Combs is an attorney. She's also a new mother. How did motherhood change her relationship with her stutter? What was it like going to law school with a stutter and how did she land a job that accepted her speech? From dark thoughts to becoming more accepting, Casey explains why it's okay to have big feelings around stuttering.

    In this episode
    Today also marks the launch of the ROCK OF HOPE film crowdfunding campaign. Support Maya and her team of stuttering filmmakers by making a pledge to the campaign today. The filmmakers need to reach 80% of their goal or they get nothing. 
    If you'd like to support but just can't afford to support monetarily, you can:
    Click "Follow" on the campaign on Seed&Spark! This is almost as beneficial as pledging because once we hit 250 "followers," regardless of how many people pledge, they'll start unlocking creator discounts for this and future projects.Use this toolkit on launch day. It includes sample language for social media and an email template to share with your friends, family, and colleagues. 

    Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/proud-stutter/exclusive-content

    • 32 min
    Stuttering As a Chief Scientist and Exploring Genetics

    Stuttering As a Chief Scientist and Exploring Genetics

    John Finn is Chief Scientific Officer at Tome Biosciences. John opens about his personal and professional journey as a person who stutters, including how it shaped his career in science, approach to public speaking, and interactions with his colleagues. He also talks about the science behind how genetics and stuttering connect.

    Episode breakdown
    00:00 “Rock of Hope” Sneak Preview 
    02:47 John Finn's Journey: From Stuttering to Scientific Breakthroughs
    12:24 The Challenges and Triumphs of Public Speaking with a Stutter
    24:36 Exploring the Genetics of Stuttering
    28:58 Final Thoughts and Advice

    In the episode
    Learn more about ROCK OF HOPE
    RSVP to the in-person documentary kickoff event in SF (May 16)
    RSVP to the virtual documentary kickoff event on Zoom (May 17) 
    Learn about Isaac Bailey, guest speaker for the May 17 virtual event
    Learn about John Finn, today’s episode guest


    Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/proud-stutter/exclusive-content

    • 31 min
    TV Personality John Stossel Opens Up About His Stutter

    TV Personality John Stossel Opens Up About His Stutter

    John Stossel, renowned TV personality and reporter, shares the challenges he faced in his broadcast journalism career and what led him to seek help with his fluency.
    03:09 John Stossel's Broadcast Journalism Career Journey & Facing His Stutter
    06:07 His Time At Hollins Communication Reconstruction Center
    09:47 Stuttering in Pop Culture
    12:48 John's Reflections and Advice


    Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/proud-stutter/exclusive-content

    • 15 min
    Stuttering In Tech: What It's Like To Be A Female Software Engineer With A Stutter

    Stuttering In Tech: What It's Like To Be A Female Software Engineer With A Stutter

    Swathi grew up in India speaking multiple languages. She talks with Maya about how her stuttering influenced interactions, often prompting language shifts. Transitioning into her career as a software engineer, Swathi finds solace in a supportive workplace environment, sharing her experiences through writing to advocate for inclusivity.

    In this episode
    Swathy's blog post


    Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/proud-stutter/exclusive-content

    • 25 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
69 Ratings

69 Ratings

Geumpyhistory ,

I’m a Stealth Stutterer

I had some teachers kind of sneak me into some random sessions with a speech therapist in elementary school, because I was in another program they didn’t think applied to me. I wasn’t really sure what I was in speech therapy for, because I didn’t have a lisp or anything. I didn’t notice my own stutter much at that time. I was painfully shy and for a long time associated it with being meek and unsure.

As an adult, it is a bit more obvious to tell what it is. Particularly bc of the tools I have found over time on my own to not get caught on words (my stutter is sometimes a little syllable repeat but mostly the caught in your mouth pause kind). Most people could know me for years and, unless they see me when I’m super sick or have a severe vitamin deficiency, they wouldn’t guess I stutter. I talk fast. If I get caught on a word, it’s so quick I’ll round back in my sentence and have other words in place. People just think I’m quirky and maybe have ADHD. Maybe I have that too, but the stutter is real. It gets really bad sometimes and can be frustrating. If I get frustrated on a sticky word too much, I won’t want to replace it and I’ll try to push through it. Probably not helpful. I don’t find my stutter to be embarrassing, but it can make people impatient. “Get to the point”. “Spit it out”. Or a few people have stuttered at me, and used an—also offensive—“dumb voice” to mock me. That was at an adult and done to be hurtful. It was.

I’ve long accepted my stutter, but I almost never talk about it. Actually, until about a year and a half ago where it got really prominent again due to stress and things. People are often surprised. But I feel like it takes a lot of pressure off a conversation to perform that ‘fluency’, and less pressure also (for me) makes me stutter less, or feel less need to round back over and over sentences to get the right words when the best word becomes a stopping point for me.

Thank you for this podcast. It’s novel, interesting, informative, and inspiring.

Dr. pepper12 ,

Amazing

This podcast is very informative and important today.I have never heard anyone talk about people who have trouble talking before. Really helps for people like me and you.keep up the great work.

kenza o ,

Keep it up!

It’s a great show and it is very inspiring to hear about all these people who are all proud of themselves and their stutters! I love all the episodes so pls keep making them! This pod is so fire ♥️♥️♥️

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