18 min

Episode 1735 - Salty science #PTonICE Daily Show

    • Fitness

Alan Fredendall // #FitnessAthleteFriday // www.ptonice.com 


In today's episode of the PT on ICE Daily Show, Fitness Athlete division leader Alan Fredendall discusses the science and practical application behind hydration & recovery drinks.
Take a listen to the episode or check out the full show notes on our blog at www.ptonice.com/blog
If you're looking to learn from our Fitness Athlete division, check out our live physical therapy courses or our online physical therapy courses. Check out our entire list of continuing education courses for physical therapy including our physical therapy certifications by checking out our website. Don't forget about all of our FREE eBooks, prebuilt workshops, free CEUs, and other physical therapy continuing education on our Resources tab.
EPISODE TRANSCRIPTION
INTRODUCTION
Hey everyone, Alan here, Chief Operating Officer here at ICE. Before we get into today's episode, I'd like to introduce our sponsor, Jane, a clinic management software and EMR with a human touch. Whether you're switching your software or going paperless for the first time ever, the Jane team knows that the onboarding process can feel a little overwhelming. That's why with Jane, you don't just get software, you get a whole team. Including in every Jane subscription is their new award-winning customer support available by phone, email, or chat whenever you need it, even on Saturdays. You can also book a free account setup consultation to review your account and ensure that you feel confident about going live with your switch. And if you'd like some extra advice along the way, you can tap into a lovely community of practitioners, clinic owners, and front desk staff through Jane's community Facebook group. If you're interested in making the switch to Jane, head on over to jane.app.switch to book a one-on-one demo with a member of Jane's support team. Don't forget to mention code IcePT1MO at the time of sign up for a one month free grace period on your new Jane account.
ALAN FREDENDALL
Good morning, PT on ICE Daily Show. Happy Friday morning, I hope your day is off to a great start. My name is Alan, I have the pleasure of serving as our Chief Operating Officer here at ICE and the Division Leader here in our Fitness Athlete Division. It is Fitness Athlete Friday, it is the best darn day of the week. Today we're gonna be talking about salty science. No, we're not gonna be talking about how upset Drake fans are by how badly they're getting beaten by Kendrick Lamar's diss drops. We are talking about the new era of salt-based hydration and what that means and how that compares to previous eras of things you might be more familiar with. Gatorade, Powerade, those sorts of things. So today we're going to talk about the origin of hydration in recovery drinks. We're going to talk about the pros and cons of what we might call the first generation of those recovery drinks. And then we will move in and talk about the new era of sodium-based drinks that may or may not have any sugar included in them.
THE HISTORY OF RECOVERY DRINKS
So recovery drinks really started as we know it a long time ago back in the 1960s, actually 1962 at the University of Florida. Researchers created a recovery drink for the Florida Gators. You now know that is Gatorade, A-D-E. Back then it was spelled Gator dash A-I-D like a band-aid, Gatorade. And this formula was rather simple. It was water, sodium, and some lemon juice. And when we look at the macronutrient breakdown of the original formula of Gatorade, if you're old enough, you may, even if you were a kid in the 80s or maybe even 90s, you remember it used to come in that glass bottle and it really had nothing in it. It had 50 calories total, it had 14 grams of carbohydrates, it had some sodium, and that was essentially it. And that was a 20 ounce bottle, 20 ounce serving. So a little bit of sugar, a little bit of sodium, and that was it. A lot of credit went to Gatorade in the 60s and 70s when

Alan Fredendall // #FitnessAthleteFriday // www.ptonice.com 


In today's episode of the PT on ICE Daily Show, Fitness Athlete division leader Alan Fredendall discusses the science and practical application behind hydration & recovery drinks.
Take a listen to the episode or check out the full show notes on our blog at www.ptonice.com/blog
If you're looking to learn from our Fitness Athlete division, check out our live physical therapy courses or our online physical therapy courses. Check out our entire list of continuing education courses for physical therapy including our physical therapy certifications by checking out our website. Don't forget about all of our FREE eBooks, prebuilt workshops, free CEUs, and other physical therapy continuing education on our Resources tab.
EPISODE TRANSCRIPTION
INTRODUCTION
Hey everyone, Alan here, Chief Operating Officer here at ICE. Before we get into today's episode, I'd like to introduce our sponsor, Jane, a clinic management software and EMR with a human touch. Whether you're switching your software or going paperless for the first time ever, the Jane team knows that the onboarding process can feel a little overwhelming. That's why with Jane, you don't just get software, you get a whole team. Including in every Jane subscription is their new award-winning customer support available by phone, email, or chat whenever you need it, even on Saturdays. You can also book a free account setup consultation to review your account and ensure that you feel confident about going live with your switch. And if you'd like some extra advice along the way, you can tap into a lovely community of practitioners, clinic owners, and front desk staff through Jane's community Facebook group. If you're interested in making the switch to Jane, head on over to jane.app.switch to book a one-on-one demo with a member of Jane's support team. Don't forget to mention code IcePT1MO at the time of sign up for a one month free grace period on your new Jane account.
ALAN FREDENDALL
Good morning, PT on ICE Daily Show. Happy Friday morning, I hope your day is off to a great start. My name is Alan, I have the pleasure of serving as our Chief Operating Officer here at ICE and the Division Leader here in our Fitness Athlete Division. It is Fitness Athlete Friday, it is the best darn day of the week. Today we're gonna be talking about salty science. No, we're not gonna be talking about how upset Drake fans are by how badly they're getting beaten by Kendrick Lamar's diss drops. We are talking about the new era of salt-based hydration and what that means and how that compares to previous eras of things you might be more familiar with. Gatorade, Powerade, those sorts of things. So today we're going to talk about the origin of hydration in recovery drinks. We're going to talk about the pros and cons of what we might call the first generation of those recovery drinks. And then we will move in and talk about the new era of sodium-based drinks that may or may not have any sugar included in them.
THE HISTORY OF RECOVERY DRINKS
So recovery drinks really started as we know it a long time ago back in the 1960s, actually 1962 at the University of Florida. Researchers created a recovery drink for the Florida Gators. You now know that is Gatorade, A-D-E. Back then it was spelled Gator dash A-I-D like a band-aid, Gatorade. And this formula was rather simple. It was water, sodium, and some lemon juice. And when we look at the macronutrient breakdown of the original formula of Gatorade, if you're old enough, you may, even if you were a kid in the 80s or maybe even 90s, you remember it used to come in that glass bottle and it really had nothing in it. It had 50 calories total, it had 14 grams of carbohydrates, it had some sodium, and that was essentially it. And that was a 20 ounce bottle, 20 ounce serving. So a little bit of sugar, a little bit of sodium, and that was it. A lot of credit went to Gatorade in the 60s and 70s when

18 min