45 episodes

Queens of the Mines features the true stories of gold rush women who blossomed from the camouflaged, twisted roots of California. Horror is revealed in true tales of the violence between races, mystery, rape and murder. We uncover a woman’s lynching, the devestating lack of human rights, the capitilization of slavery, devastation of natural disasters, and the genocide of the indegenous people, swept under the rug. It turns out the “American Dream” looked different to everyone, depending on who you were, and where you came from. Have our textbooks been self-serving of the American myth they called Manifest Destiny? Find out on “Queens of the Mines”. Eliza Inman, a frontier pioneer, in 1843 wrote, “If Hell laid to the west, Americans would cross Heaven to reach it”, it looks like she was right.
Subscribe at queensofthemines.podbean.com
You don’t wanna miss a queen.

Queens of the Mines Andrea Anderson, Gold Rush Author & Historian

    • History
    • 4.8 • 87 Ratings

Queens of the Mines features the true stories of gold rush women who blossomed from the camouflaged, twisted roots of California. Horror is revealed in true tales of the violence between races, mystery, rape and murder. We uncover a woman’s lynching, the devestating lack of human rights, the capitilization of slavery, devastation of natural disasters, and the genocide of the indegenous people, swept under the rug. It turns out the “American Dream” looked different to everyone, depending on who you were, and where you came from. Have our textbooks been self-serving of the American myth they called Manifest Destiny? Find out on “Queens of the Mines”. Eliza Inman, a frontier pioneer, in 1843 wrote, “If Hell laid to the west, Americans would cross Heaven to reach it”, it looks like she was right.
Subscribe at queensofthemines.podbean.com
You don’t wanna miss a queen.

    The Queens of the Mines

    The Queens of the Mines

    Buy the book here! https://www.amazon.com/Queens-Mines-Women-twisted-California/dp/B09DN1J6GB


    Stories of astonishing women from California’s 1849 gold rush history.

    What was it like for the women in California during the 1850’s? What hardships did they face? What victories were they able to realize? Who were the first women who came to California, and who was already here?

    Explore the lives of brilliant people who made their own way, whose stories contributed to the shaping of the future of California and the United States, in a time where women were not so welcome to do so.

    They are rarely talked about, and I want you to know their names.

    Including but not limited to, Belle Cora, Ah Toy, Josefa Segovia, Madame Moustache, Mary Ellen Pleasant, Nika, Luzena Wilson, Lola Montez, Lotta Crabtree, and Charley Parkhurst.

    • 43 sec
    Emma Nevada - The Comstock Nightingale

    Emma Nevada - The Comstock Nightingale

    Queens of the Mines features the authentic stories of gold rush women who blossomed from the camouflaged, twisted roots of California. Today, we learn the story of Emma Nevada,  The Comstock Nightingale.  QOTM is looking for sponsors, and advertisers. New and old episodes are being downloaded everyday. If you are interested in supporting the continuation of QOTM, reach out to us via the link on queensofthemines.com




    Thank You to our Sponsors

    -Sonora Florist

    -Columbia Mercantile 1855

    -The Law Office of Charles B Smith

    -River Ranch Music Festival #21

    • 27 min
    Sue Ko Lee & Sarah‘s Soapbox on Feminism

    Sue Ko Lee & Sarah‘s Soapbox on Feminism

    It was Labor Day last Monday, and I wanted to take this week to honor a labor union organizer who was a woman named Sue. I found most of my information from the US National Park Service but you can find a more extensive list of references in the show notes for this episode. Make sure to follow the Queens of the Mines instagram and facebook pages this week for images from the story!

    If you enjoy the podcast, please make sure to rate, subscribe and check out what Queensofthemines.com has to offer, including the new book Queens of the Mines,in paperback and on Kindle.

    Sue Ko Lee

    Ok, so let’s talk about Sue Ko Lee, just you and me. Next week, I will have a guest but today it is just us.

    Sue Ko Lee was born in Honolulu, Hawaii March 9, 1920. She grew up in Watsonville, California, for our out of state listeners, that is in Santa Cruz County, just south of the Santa Cruz that you may know. Sue was the oldest of ten children. - already in a leadership role.
    She met Lee Jew Hing, who was an immigrant from China. He was a bookkeeper for National Dollar Stores. Most Chinese workers in San Francisco worked for Chinese employers like Joe Shoong, the owner of National Dollar Stores. They married when Sue was 18. She soon took a job at the same factory, along with several of her family members as Chinese American garment workers.
    Chinese American garment workers were working in poor conditions and making low wages. They had limited options because most white-owned businesses refused to hire them. Also, the Chinese immigrant community was so close-knit, many workers were connected to their bosses through family and friendship ties. Such personal relationships sometimes made workers reluctant to speak out against poor treatment.
    Many unions had supported the Page Act and the Chinese Exclusion Act. The Page Act of 1875 was the first restrictive federal immigration law in the United States, which effectively prohibited the entry of Chinese women, marking the end of open borders. Seven years later, the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act banned immigration by Chinese men as well. So Chinese workers like Lee and her family had a complicated relationship with the labor movement.
    Until the 1900s, Chinese and Chinese American workers were locked out of unionized factories by racist hiring practices. They reasonably feared that if all the factories were unionized, their jobs would be taken by white workers.
    Unions like the International Ladies‘ Garment Workers‘ Union were working hard to organize Black, Latino, and Asian American workers in the 1930’s. The International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union was one of the largest labor unions in the United States in the 1900s, representing hundreds of thousands of mostly female clothing industry workers.
    In the 1930s, the garment industry was the largest employer in San Francisco’s Chinatown. Chinese-owned factories undercut white-owned union shops by charging lower prices for work, paying lower wages and assigning their workers longer hours. Here the workers continued to toil under sweatshop conditions, earning wages ranging from $4 to $16 a week. Sue Ko Lee, a button hole machine operator, worked in the National Dollar Store factory for 25¢ an hour. These practices allowed them to stay in business in the face of the hardship of the Great Depression—but came at a high cost to their workers. This concerned the International Ladies‘ Garment Workers‘ Union.
    The International Ladies‘ Garment Workers‘ Union organizers struggled to make any headway among Chinese workers until Jennie Matyas, an immigrant from Hungary arrived as the new organizer. Matyas built personal relationships with the workers and their Chinese community and earned their trust.
    Sue Ko Lee and her coworkers voted to join the International Ladies‘ Garment Workers‘ Union, using ballots written in both English and Chinese. They became the Chinese Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union, Local 341.
    In 1938, she

    • 41 min
    MMIWG Mini Episode - Jade Wagon - Missing in Wyoming

    MMIWG Mini Episode - Jade Wagon - Missing in Wyoming

    We are in a time where historians and the public are no longer dismissing the “conflict history” that has been minimized or blotted out. We now have the opportunity to incorporate the racial and patriarchal experience in the presentation of American reality. That is why today we are going to talk about Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. The preceding episode may feature foul language and or adult content including violence which may be disturbing some listeners, or secondhand listeners. So, discretion is advised.
    Today, we are not talking about California History. This is an ad free episode. We are back to our regularly scheduled episodes next week.
    Have you heard of #MMIWG? The meaning behind the hashtag is Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. 95 percent of these cases were never covered by national or international media. It’s a hidden epidemic. I bring this up in light of the case of Gabby P, and the national coverage the case is getting in comparison to media coverage on the missing Indigenous women in the nation. 18% of Indigenous female homicide victims had newspaper media coverage, as compared to 51% of White homicide victims and the newspaper articles for Indigenous homicide victims were more likely to contain violent language, portray the victim in a negative light, and provide less information as compared to articles about White homicide victims. This is not different for other communities of color. Education lawyer Johnathan S. Perkins tweeted, “Name one Black woman who went missing and garnered national media attention. I’ll wait.”
    Indigenous people account for less than 3% of the population in Wyoming. The largest number of Indigenous people were Eastern Shoshone and the Northern Arapaho and living on the Wind River Indian Reservation in Fremont County. There were 34 Indigenous female homicide victims between 2000 and 2020. In the latter of the 10 years, the homicide rate was 6.4 times higher than the homicide rate for White females. Despite their small percentage of the population, Indigenous people experience violence, homicide, sexual assault, and are reported missing at disproportionate rates relative to any other race/ethnicity in Wyoming. I would like to take the time to acknowledge one of this year‘s most recently vanished Indigenous Women, and she also went missing in Wyoming, just like Gabby. It’s not that there shouldn’t be concern and outrage surrounding Petito’s disappearance, but despite the fact that 40 percent of Americans reported missing are people of color, this national outcry is rarely replicated for anyone other than a white person.
    Jade Keilee Wagon born Feb 3, 1996 was a Northern Arapaho tribal woman, Her Northern Arapaho Indian name was Cedar Tree Stands Alone. She stood 5‘4‘‘ tall and weighed roughly 140 pounds with brown hair and brown eyes. She had a one of a kind sense of humor and you could spot her cute silly laugh in the largest crowd. Jade was a dedicated mother of two children, MaeLeah and Raphael, and was close with her family. Wagon graduated from St. Stephens Indian School in 2014 and was preparing to attend the Wind River Job Corps to learn a trade and someday have a career in the medical field. From the time she was 19 she had the privilege of being a stay at home mother.
    Before she was 23, she visited the following states; Utah, Montana, Colorado, South Dakota, New Mexico as well as Florida. She loved to spend time in the mountains. Being outdoors and enjoying nature gave her the feeling of empowerment of being free. Jade was devoted to her Native Ways attending sweats, fasting, and looking for guidance. She had a strong faith that no one could take from her. She was baptized into the Catholic faith and was a devoted member of both St. Stephen’s Catholic Church and St. Margaret’s Catholic Church. She worked at the Wind River Casino for a short time. 30 minutes away from the Wind River Casino was the Shosho

    • 12 min
    National Day for Truth and Reconciliation - Bonus Episode

    National Day for Truth and Reconciliation - Bonus Episode

    “This is Queens of the Mines, where we discuss untold stories from the twisted roots of California. Today, we’ll be talking about Indian Boarding Schools in the US and California. We are in a time where historians and the public are no longer dismissing the “conflict history” that has been minimized or blotted out. We now have the opportunity to incorporate the racial and patriarchal experience in the presentation of American reality. The preceding episode may feature foul language and or adult content including violence which may be disturbing some listeners, or secondhand listeners. So, discretion is advised.

    Over 1,300 bodies of First Nations students were found at former Canada‘s residential schools this year. In response, Canada has declared September 30 2021, as the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. Since 2013, this day has been commemorated as Orange Shirt Day.
    Like most of our topics on the podcast, the truth about our Indian boarding school has been written out of the US history books. The system has long been condemned by Native Americans as a form of cultural genocide. By 1926, nearly 83% of Indian school-age children were attending boarding schools. There once were over 350 government-funded Indian Boarding schools across the US where native children were forcibly abducted by government agents, sent to schools hundreds of miles away, and beaten, starved, or otherwise abused when they spoke their native languages. Nothing short of the previous Mission System, truly.

    This Episode is also brought to you by the Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH. Are you facing criminal charges in California? The most important thing you can do is obtain legal counsel from an aggressive Criminal Defense Lawyer lawyer you can trust. The Law Office of Charles B. Smith has the knowledge and experience to assess your situation and help you build a strong defense against your charges. The Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH do not just defend cases, they represent people. So visit their website cbsattorney.com, we know even in the gold rush no one liked attorneys, but Charles you will love.

    Between 1869 and the 1960s, hundreds of thousands of Native American children were voluntarily or forcibly removed from their homes, families, communities and placed in boarding schools. where they were punished for speaking their native language, banned from acting in any way that might be seen to represent traditional or cultural practices, stripped of traditional clothing, hair and personal belongings and behaviors reflective of their native culture. The United States government tied Native Americans’ naturalization to the eradication of Native American cultural identity and complete assimilation into the “white culture.” Congress passed an act in 1887 that established “every Indian born within the territorial limits of the United States who has voluntarily taken up… his residence separate and apart from any tribe of Indians…[and] adopted the habits of civilized life…” may secure a United States citizenship.
    Often these residential schools were run by different faith groups including Methodists, Latter-day Saints (LDS) and Catholics. Like the Missions, often crowded conditions,students weakened by overwork and lack of public sanitation put students at risk for infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, measles and trachoma. None of these diseases were yet treatable by antibiotics or controlled by vaccines, and epidemics swept schools as they did cities. Often students were prevented from communicating with their families, and parents were not notified when their children fell ill; the schools also failed sometimes to notify them when a child died. ”Many of the Indian deaths during the great influenza pandemic of 1918–19, which hit the Native American population hard, took place in boarding schools. ”The 1928 Meriam Report noted that death rates for Native American students were six and a half times highe

    • 16 min
    The Murderous Mail Order Bride of Tuttletown

    The Murderous Mail Order Bride of Tuttletown

    This is Queens of the Mines. Today I am going to tell you the story of the Murderous Mail Order Bride of Tuttletown from 1929. The preceding episode may feature foul language and or adult content including violence which may be disturbing some listeners, or secondhand listeners. So, discretion is advised.




    On a ranch on blanket creek, near the current Kress Ranch Road, lived  Carroll and his parents Stephen Rablen and Corrine Brown. They were a well known family in Sonora who were pioneers there during the gold rush. Corrine was the daughter of the late C.C. Brown, a prominent lawyer of Sonora. 




    Carroll had been married twice, first to Martha Copeland and second to Eva Young. Neither marriage lasted. While serving during WW 1 in France, a German shell exploded in Carroll’s dugout, causing him to lose his hearing. The thirty-four year old veteran returned to Tuttletown to live with his widower father. The hearing impairment made Carroll too shy to meet a local girl. Yet he was lonely.




    So lonely that, in June of 1928, Carroll placed an ad in a San Francisco matrimonial paper in search of a bride. He stated that he was looking for a woman who would enjoy a life with him hiking and enjoying the natural wonders of the Sierra Nevadas. The ad was printed in matrimonial papers across the nation and a thirty-three year old waitress in Texas responded to Rablen’s request. They wrote back and forth. She told him she was a heavy boned blond with a twin sister who she called Effie and a son, Albert. About Albert, Eva wrote to Rablan, he has had no father since he was a month old. The father left her. She hasn‘t seen him and if a man left her she wouldn‘t want to see them again and she would make sure she didn‘t.” It was an odd thing to say during courtship. They continued to write back and forth and it was decided that Eva would leave Texas, come to California and the two would be married. 




    Carroll met Eva at the station in San Francisco, and together they traveled to Nevada where they were married in Reno. Her twin sister Effie and son Albert soon followed her out to California. Stephen Rablen was not keen on the idea of his son’s previously divorced “mail order bride”. Steven questioned her motives. The town was curious. 




    One year after the wedding, the gossiping had died off. Carroll had found a job as a clerk with Standard City Lumber, which was being acquired and would soon be named Pickering Lumber and the couple was living on a chicken ranch in Standard City. The two of them quarreled often and shared a toxic and unhealthy relationship. When Eva transferred herself as the beneficiary on the $3,500 life insurance policy Carroll had purchased for himself, his father Stephen was alarmed. 




    Stephen Rablen played the fiddle and a local wedding or party seldom went without Stephen and his brother John providing the music. The brothers had been asked to play at a community dance at the Tuttletown school house on the 29th of April in 1929. Carroll and Eva joined them for the party. Well, Eva did.  Carroll’s insecurities with his hearing impairment kept him from fully enjoying the festivities and as per usual, Carroll waited out the night in the car while his wife danced the night away with the people from town. 

    Halfway through the night, Stephen was playing “Turkey in the Straw” on his fiddle when Eva went to the refreshment table to make up a sandwich and a cup of coffee for Carroll. She would bring him a refreshment to the car. With her hands full, Eva made her way across the dance floor towards the front door. Alice Shea, a local woman who was dancing, jostled her arm, and some of the coffee spilled on Alice’s pink dress. Oops. 




    Eva made her way outside with the sandwich and cup of coffee to her husband who was still in the car. “Here dear, here is something to eat.” Carroll thanked his bride, she waved and returned to the dance floor. He had a few bites of his sandwich

    • 22 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
87 Ratings

87 Ratings

jeb209 ,

Golden Amaza’nonballs!

One of if not my favorite podcast. Andrea Anderson knocks it out of the Golden California Ballpark with this one. You go kitten

firerosechild ,

Love it!!

Thanks for providing a new perspective on Gold Rush history! So much of the stories told are male and white. Great storytelling and easy to follow. Plus hosted by a hometown hero!

laurenanne81 ,

Excellent pod!

Fantastic storytelling and Andreas voice is super soothing to boot! Getting a little ASMR with my history lessons.

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