50 episodes

From the civil rights movement to the rise of American multiculturalism, race continues to play a role in shaping our society. Explore this collection from the University of California, which seeks to broaden our understanding of race issues in America from diverse perspectives.

Race in America (Video‪)‬ UCTV

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    • 3.7 • 3 Ratings

From the civil rights movement to the rise of American multiculturalism, race continues to play a role in shaping our society. Explore this collection from the University of California, which seeks to broaden our understanding of race issues in America from diverse perspectives.

    • video
    American Thanatocracy vs Abolition Democracy: On Cops Capitalism and the War on Black Life

    American Thanatocracy vs Abolition Democracy: On Cops Capitalism and the War on Black Life

    In this program, Robin D. G. Kelley, Distinguished Professor and Gary B. Nash Endowed Chair in U.S. History at UCLA, examines how police in the neoliberal era–in tandem with other state and corporate entities—have become engines of capital accumulation, government revenue, gentrification, the municipal bond market, the tech and private security industry—in a phrase, the profits of death. Kelley argues the police don’t just take lives; they make life and living less viable for the communities they occupy. The growth of police power has also fundamentally weakened democracy and strengthened “thanatocracy”—rule by death– especially with respect to Black communities.

    Kelley says these same communities have produced a new abolition democracy, organizing to advance a different future, without oppression and exploitation, war, poverty, prisons, police, borders, the constraints of imposed gender, sexual, and ableist norms, and an economic system that destroys the planet while generating obscene inequality. Series: "UC Berkeley Graduate Lectures" [Public Affairs] [Show ID: 39780]

    • 1 hr 34 min
    • video
    Today's Social and Political Issues with Charles Blow

    Today's Social and Political Issues with Charles Blow

    As a New York Times columnist known for his fearless brand of political and social commentary, Charles Blow has become a familiar face on TV and a frequent target for conservative critics. His column typically features charts, but it's mainly his words, written and spoken, that continue to spark conversation and debate about social and political issues of the day. As a speaker, Blow fearlessly tackles contentious issues, such as racism, childhood obesity, life in large cities, acceptance of gays in society, and the current administration. Blow has recently spoken on topics such as: income inequality, xenophobia, teen pregnancy, education and the relationship between journalism and justice. In this program, Blow talks with Lorie Hearn, CEO of iNewsource, about the issues facing America. Series: "Helen Edison Lecture Series" [Public Affairs] [Show ID: 39287]

    • 42 min
    • video
    Challenging Hate: How to Stop Anti-AAPI Violence and Bias

    Challenging Hate: How to Stop Anti-AAPI Violence and Bias

    Sparked by the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities across the country have been subjected to increased hate incidents, including verbal harassment, civil rights violations, and physical assaults. Since its founding in March 2020, thousands of incidents have been reported to the Stop AAPI Hate coalition. Manjusha Kulkarni will discuss how Stop AAPI Hate is addressing anti-Asian hate through civil rights enforcement, education equity, community-based safety, and building a movement against systemic racism. Series: "Ethics, Religion and Public Life: Walter H. Capps Center Series" [Public Affairs] [Show ID: 39081]

    • 1 hr 21 min
    • video
    Asian American Activism: Drawing on History Inspiring the Future

    Asian American Activism: Drawing on History Inspiring the Future

    Asian/Pacific Islander American communities have a long history of activism in the United States, particularly in response to anti-Asian racism and exclusion. In their struggle for equality and liberation from oppression, AAPI activists have developed social and political movements for immigrant rights, labor rights, educational equity, affordable housing, religious freedom, environmental justice, and more. This panel features several AAPI activists who will discuss how they became activists, their work on the leading edges of activism, and how more people can get involved. Series: "Ethics, Religion and Public Life: Walter H. Capps Center Series" [Public Affairs] [Show ID: 39080]

    • 1 hr 25 min
    • video
    Beyond Affirmative Action: Ensuring Equity in Uncertain Times

    Beyond Affirmative Action: Ensuring Equity in Uncertain Times

    How can colleges and universities ensure faculty and students reflect the diversity of the U.S. as courts and legislatures dismantle affirmation action? In this program, Stella M. Flores, Ph.D., a professor of Higher Education and Public Policy at the University of Texas, Austin, discusses her research on the effects of state and federal policies on college access and completion outcomes for low-income and underrepresented populations, including immigrant and English learner students. Dr. Flores has also published widely on demographic changes in U.S. schools, affirmative action in higher education, and Minority Serving Institutions. In 2003 her coauthored work was cited in the U.S. Supreme Court Gratz v. Bollinger decision (dissenting opinion) and in various amicus briefs submitted to the Supreme Court on affirmative action. [Public Affairs] [Education] [Show ID: 38738]

    • 59 min
    • video
    Exploring Racial Resentment and Politics

    Exploring Racial Resentment and Politics

    “I’m not a racist, but…” In their new book, Racial Resentment in the Political Mind (University of Chicago Press), Goldman School Dean David C. Wilson and Notre Dame Professor of Political Science Darren Davis explore the concept of racial resentment. They argue that while prejudice and racism are fundamentally rooted in American politics, so are non-racial motivations, such as a belief in a “just” world, where people get what they deserve and deserve what they get. This instinct to make judgments about “deservingness” in politics often animates those who believe they are “not racist,” but tend to oppose policies and ideas that advance racial justice, and blame racial-ethnic minorities for their social, political, and economic positions. Join Dean Wilson and Professor Davis in conversation with Assistant Vice Chancellor Dan Mogulof about their research findings and why a nuanced conversation about race is critical to democracy.  Series: "The Goldman School - Berkeley Public Policy" [Public Affairs] [Show ID: 37781]

    • 58 min

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