10 episodes

Join Chapel Hill Public Library staff and community members as we uncover the untold histories of Chapel Hill. We seek to reckon with our past to figure out where we came from and why it matters for our shared future.
Season one of Re/Collecting Chapel Hill was supported by grant funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the federal Library Services and Technology Act as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

Re/Collecting Chapel Hill Chapel Hill Public Library

    • History
    • 4.9, 22 Ratings

Join Chapel Hill Public Library staff and community members as we uncover the untold histories of Chapel Hill. We seek to reckon with our past to figure out where we came from and why it matters for our shared future.
Season one of Re/Collecting Chapel Hill was supported by grant funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the federal Library Services and Technology Act as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

    Bonus: The Quiet

    Bonus: The Quiet

    The mission of Re/Collecting Chapel Hill is to share stories of our community’s history from the inside out and bottom up. Usually, that means sharing stories from the past, in the voices of the people who lived that history. We’re not totally sure how to document and share history of the present moment.


    Real talk. It’s feeling like a lot right now. Kids are home. Grownups are home. We’re all trying to figure out how to do this thing, settling in for the long haul. At the podcast, we’re thinking about how we can best serve our community and history. We don’t know, not yet. But we’d love to keep hearing your voices. The messages we’ve received over the past week were sometimes scared, sometimes funny. We’re going to share those messages with you today.


    And you out there, listening. You are the living history we want to hear. Head to chapelhillhistory.org or call us at (919) 960-1736.‬ Tell us what’s changed in your world. Tell us about the quiet.
    Links:
    (11) John Howie Jr.John Howie Jr (@johnhowiejr) • Instagram photos and videos — Solo/Rosewood Bluff/Two Dollar Pistols. NC Honky Tonk singer/songwriter + drums on occasion. Not Tonight is out on Suah Sounds.

    • 18 min
    Bonus: Message In a Bottle

    Bonus: Message In a Bottle

    Hello out there

    This is a confusing and difficult time in Chapel Hill and in the world. To slow the spread of COVID-19, we must isolate ourselves in our homes and distance ourselves from the places and activities that usually make up our days. Our strange shared mission is solitude.


    As a result, we’re starting to live our lives in totally unfamiliar ways—working from home, diving deeper and longer into dinner conversations, home-schooling our kids, and taking up new activities that we otherwise wouldn’t have found the time or space for.


    As audio storytellers, we at Re/Collecting Chapel Hill want to explore creative ways to connect our community by collecting stories and sounds of the way lives are changing and people are feeling in and around Chapel Hill.


    So tell us your news. Share something that’s bringing you joy. We want to hear it all. This may turn into a short podcast series, or it may simply end up being an audio record of this challenging and curious time.


    Record your own message-in-a-bottle at chapelhillhistory.org. We can't wait to hear from you.

    • 12 min
    Ep 7: What Comes Next. Silent Sam part 3

    Ep 7: What Comes Next. Silent Sam part 3

    In August, 2018 student activists toppled UNC's confederate monument, Silent Sam. In our final part of our 3-part series exploring the history of the statue, we dig into the question: what comes after Silent Sam?

    • 23 min
    Ep 6: James Cates. Silent Sam part 2

    Ep 6: James Cates. Silent Sam part 2

    Part 2, in our 3-part Silent Sam series.


    In this episode, we share the story of James Cates. James was born and raised in Chapel Hill. In 1970, when he was just 22-years-old, he was murderd on UNC campus.


    Journalist Mike Ogle has spent years researching the life and death of James Cates. We'll share his work and hear from community members who knew Cates, including those with him when he died.


    Season one of Re/Collecting Chapel Hill was supported by grant funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the federal Library Services and Technology Act as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.
    Links:
    James Cates — This research was compiled and published by Mike Ogle on October 26, 2018 on Twitter.

    • 37 min
    Ep 5: An Old Argument. Silent Sam part 1

    Ep 5: An Old Argument. Silent Sam part 1

    What was the meaning of the American Civil War? And why are we still arguing over this some 150 years later? In this, the first of our 3-part series on Silent Sam, we explore the purpose of confederate monuments and their impact on the African American community in Chapel Hill.


    From the work of United Daughters of the Confederacy in the early 1900s to spread their version of history throughout the south, to the first stirrings of the Black Power Movement at the end of the 1960s, we will hear how the white south's lost cause mythology affected the lives of black people, and how young Chapel Hillians began to push back on that narrative.


    We introduce one of our associate producers in this episode, Klaus Mayr. Klaus spent countless hours researching histories, collecting audio, and assisting in editing all three parts of our Silent Sam series.


    This episode was written and produced by Klaus Mayr, Molly Luby, and Danita Mason-Hogans. Editing by Klaus and Molly. Mixing by Ryan Chamberlain. With thanks to Aaron Keane for audio recording, technical assitance, and production coaching.


    Season one of Re/Collecting Chapel Hill was supported by grant funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the federal Library Services and Technology Act as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.
    Links:
    The Ku Klux Klan: or Invisible empire - Laura Martin Rose - Google Books — Who were the Ku Klux? Where did the Klan originate? What was its object and mission?Silent Sam: The Confederate Monument at the University of North CarolinaSilent Sam — We created this site to help people learn about UNC’s Confederate monument. It tells a story that is vitally important at this moment in the life of our university, state, and nation. We believe that knowing the past is a necessary first step toward creating a better future. The Silent Sam Syllabus: A Module for Teaching Confederate Monumentality — Monument Lab — Where did all these monuments come from? What were they meant to symbolize, and how has that symbolism changed over time? Who built them, and for whom were they intended? How does one differentiate between American history and American mythology? What should be done with these monuments?Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina | Confederate Monument, UNC (Chapel Hill) — Julian Carr spoke at the dedication of the monument in 1913. His speech recounted the heroic efforts of the men the monument honored as well as the women on the home front. The speech also spoke to the racialized nature of the commemoration as Carr tells this story: “100 yards from where we stand, less than 90 days perhaps after my return from Appomattox, I horse-whipped a negro wench, until her skirts hung in shreds, because upon the streets of this quiet village she had publicly insulted and maligned a Southern lady.”[Easy Chair] | The Monument Wars, by Rebecca Solnit | Harper's Magazine — “Us,” of course, refers to white people. The history books insist that the North won the war, but in the South it’s hard to find the evidence. If the North had won the war, there would not be statues and street names honoring the defeated leaders. If the North had won the war, our monuments would be to the suffering of slaves and their struggle to be free. If the North had won the war, the Confederate flag would be a symbol of shameful beliefs and military defeat, seen only in museums. If the North had won the war, the war would be over.

    • 30 min
    Ep 4: Mayor of Franklin Street

    Ep 4: Mayor of Franklin Street

    Public memorials are embedded in our landscape. In this episode we learn the history behind two public memorial benches that bookend the Bolin Creek Trail in Chapel Hill.


    Learn how two men devoted their lives to making our public spaces more open and accessbile for all of us...and how one man tried to stop such work from ever happening.


    This episode was produced and edited by Molly Luby, with help from Mandella Younge, Omar Roque, David Felton, and Susan Brown. Audio mixing by Ryan Chamberlain. 


    Season one of Re/Collecting Chapel Hill was supported by grant funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the federal Library Services and Technology Act as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.
    Links:
    Remembering Joe Herzenberg: Lightning Brown recalled as fighter on local, gay issues: Chapel Hill activist dies at 48 — Brown was drafting an ordinance to clarify Chapel Hill's rules for people who run businesses in their homes. It was issues like this one, obscure yet crucial to people's lives, that fired Brown's blood during the past 20 years of being one of the most consistent and persuasive community activists in town. The only thing that finally could stop Brown from getting his way, it seems, was the AIDS virus that finally overwhelmed him Monday. He was 48.
    A-0381 :: Southern Oral History Program Interview Database — Joseph Herzenberg was a member of the Chapel Hill Town Council from 1979-1981 and 1987-1993, and was often said to be the only openly gay elected official in the South during those periods. He discusses (extensively) the evolution of gay politics in North Carolina and his own career in local politics and as a history teacher and civil rights activist, including many details about his campaigns, gay political organizations and opposition to these.Community Center Park scupture honoring Lightning Brown, a community activist and advocate for Chapel Hill greenways — “Community Center Park scupture honoring Lightning Brown, a community activist and advocate for Chapel Hill greenways”  Community Arts & Culture | Town of Chapel Hill, NC — Herzenberg was a noted advocate for the environment, civil liberties, and the interests of low-income people, and he played a great part in the enactment of Chapel Hill's tree protection ordinance, the creation of the Chapel Hill Greenways system, and the preservation of the Chapel Hill downtown historic district.Thank you, Joe Herzenberg | Friends of Chapel Hill Parks and Recreation — We remember Joe by making key improvements to the trail he loved and invite others to do the same.The Collected Poems (Book) | Chapel Hill Public Library | BiblioCommons — Price wrote a series of poems for Lightning Brown, before and after Brown's death. Find them all in this collection. Feasting the Heart (Book) | Chapel Hill Public Library | BiblioCommons — Find the full essay about Lightning Brown, "A Single Death Among Many," in this Reynolds Price collection. The essay concludes with Price's poem "Scattering Lightning on the Slave Cemetery in Chapel Hill."The Tougaloo Nine Remembered | American Libraries Magazine — Geraldine Edwards Hollis was one of nine young African American students at the historically black Tougaloo College in Mississippi who were arrested for entering the whites-only public library in Jackson on March 27, 1961. In a Sunday program titled “Desegregating Public Libraries,” Hollis told what happened that day, when they requested books not held by the “colored” branch of the library and were arrested by police because they did not belong there. A local newspaper called the read-in the “first move to integrate public facilities in Jackson.”

    • 22 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
22 Ratings

22 Ratings

pieshadow ,

Excellent

Incredibly thoughtful, compelling, and heartwarming! I really enjoy listening to the evolution of the city of Chapel Hill through the lens of justice. I can tell a lot of time and research went into producing this. Can’t wait for the next episode!

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