37 episodes

At Real Food Media, we believe each one of us has a story to tell, and that sharing our stories strengthens our communities and our movements. Our two podcast series bring you stories from the food movement through a powerful combination of “book smarts” and “street smarts” (or is it soil savvy?). Real Food Reads, our long-standing book club and podcast, interviews the authors of today’s most important books at the intersection of food, politics, and culture. And our newest podcast series, Foodtopias, showcases the stories of workers, farmers, healers, ecologists, BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and people of color), womxn, and community organizers who are growing food & cultivating utopia. Together, Real Food Media podcasts offer you the inspiration you need to build your own food activist toolkit. For more resources, visit: www.realfoodmedia.org.

Real Food Media Real Food Media

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9 • 30 Ratings

At Real Food Media, we believe each one of us has a story to tell, and that sharing our stories strengthens our communities and our movements. Our two podcast series bring you stories from the food movement through a powerful combination of “book smarts” and “street smarts” (or is it soil savvy?). Real Food Reads, our long-standing book club and podcast, interviews the authors of today’s most important books at the intersection of food, politics, and culture. And our newest podcast series, Foodtopias, showcases the stories of workers, farmers, healers, ecologists, BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and people of color), womxn, and community organizers who are growing food & cultivating utopia. Together, Real Food Media podcasts offer you the inspiration you need to build your own food activist toolkit. For more resources, visit: www.realfoodmedia.org.

    Fresh Banana Leaves Dr. Jessica Hernandez Ep. 57

    Fresh Banana Leaves Dr. Jessica Hernandez Ep. 57

    Indigenous people make up 5 percent of the global population and steward 80 percent of the world's biodiversity, yet they aren’t centered in most discussions or actions for environmental justice. An Indigenous woman and scientist, Dr. Jessica Hernandez talks about the importance of Indigenous science (and scientists) in her new book Fresh Banana Leaves: Healing Indigenous Landscapes through Indigenous Science. In this conversation, Jessica talks about the importance of Indigenous-led stewardship projects, Black-Indigenous solidarity, and shares the moving story of how she came to the book’s title.

    SHOW NOTES:
    1:51 | The difference between an interdisciplinary scientist and an Indigenous scientist

    3:50 | What is Indigenous science?

    5:50 | Indigenous people support 80% of the world’s biodiversity

    10:15 | Conservation as a Western construct and the trouble with the original concept of National Parks

    12:44 | The importance of #LandBack and Indigenous-led stewardship projects

    17:49 | The impact of banana plantations in Central America

    22:30 | The title of the book and the personal impact of war in El Salvador


    DIG DEEPER:
    To learn more about Dr. Jessica Hernandez, visit her site https://www.jessicabhernandez.com/
    Follow Jessica on Twitter: https://twitter.com/doctora_nature
    Buy the book: https://bookshop.org/books/fresh-banana-leaves-healing-indigenous-landscapes-through-indigenous-science
    ​​For more on this episode, expanded show notes, and full transcript, visit: https://realfoodmedia.org/portfolio/fresh-banana-leaves/

    Join the Real Food Reads book club: https://realfoodmedia.org/programs/real-food-reads/
    Become a Patreon supporter for early access to our episodes and premium content with the authors here https://www.patreon.com/realfoodmedia

    • 35 min
    Endangered Maize: Helen Anne Curry | Ep. 56

    Endangered Maize: Helen Anne Curry | Ep. 56

    There is a broad consensus around the “endangerment” of crop diversity—among scientists, advocates, policymakers, and corporations, actors who tend to disagree on a number of other issues. But Helen Anne Curry says: not so fast. Where does this endangerment narrative come from? Whose interests does it serve? And what assumptions does it make? Conventional approaches to crop conservation largely center on conserving seeds off-farm in gene banks, as opposed to protecting the livelihoods, communities, and farming systems of the peasants and Indigenous peoples who developed and steward those seeds. In this conversation, Curry delves into the history and science of seed conservation—and its implications for the future of food.

    SHOW NOTES:
    2:23 | What is the “endangerment narrative”?
    6:11 | Origins of endangerment in the early history of plant breeding and industrial agriculture
    14:35 | Endangerment as an outgrowth of settler colonialist & racist assumptions
    19:01 | Defining ex situ (off site) vs. in situ (on site) seed conservation
    24:08 | Does diversity change and evolve over time? Is crop diversity inevitably declining or can we think about crop diversity increasing?
    28:00 | Crisis thinking or crisis narratives
    34:03 | The story of glass gem corn
    37:15 | Difference between conventional and food sovereignty approaches to seed conservation

    DIG DEEPER:
    To learn more about Helen Anne Curry, visit http://www.helenannecurry.com/
    Follow Helen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/hacurry
    Buy the book: https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520307698/endangered-maize
    ​​For more on this episode, expanded show notes, and full transcript, visit: https://realfoodmedia.org/portfolio/endangered-maize-industrial-agriculture-and-the-crisis-of-extinction/
    Join the Real Food Reads book club: https://realfoodmedia.org/programs/real-food-reads/
    Become a Patreon supporter for early access to our episodes and premium content with the authors here: https://www.patreon.com/realfoodmedia

    • 39 min
    Healing Grounds: Liz Carlisle & Aidee Guzman | Ep. 55

    Healing Grounds: Liz Carlisle & Aidee Guzman | Ep. 55

    Colonialism is at the root of the problems we see in our food system, and, as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recently stated, it is also at the root of the climate crisis. By cultivating diversity within the soil and amongst farmers, we can work towards a liberated future. “Healing Grounds: Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming” by Liz Carlisle shares the stories of Black, Indigenous, Latino, and Asian-American farmers around the United States who are using their ancestral agricultural traditions to heal the soil, build climate resilience, connect with their culture, and create pathways for racial justice. Tiffani’s conversation with author Liz Carlisle and scientist Aidee Guzman highlights what is possible when we focus on diversity above and below ground.

    SHOW NOTES:

    02:25 | The four per mille study and why regenerative agriculture has sparked hope in recent years.

    04:35 | What’s possible when you take “regeneration” and regenerative agriculture to heart

    06:25 | Aidee Guzman’s research on soil health and habits of bees on diverse farms vs monoculture farms in California’s Central Valley

    07:56 | The 450 million year old fungi that helped bring plants to the land.

    10:05 | How to support a diversity of farmers and farming techniques

    13:53 | History of agroecology in Mexico and how it intersected with the Green Revolution

    19:33 | There’s no such thing as a weed

    21:35 | For Aidee, there are two distinct worlds of agriculture

    25:12 | Reciprocal farm labor practices abroad and in the US

    29:40 | How the agricultural industry in the US was designed and why it is extractive today

    32:45 | The one thing Liz Carlisle and Aidee Guzman want you to know about climate, justice, and the deep roots of regenerative farming.

    DIG IN:
    To learn more about Aidee Guzman, visit https://www.aideeguzman.com/
    To learn more about Liz Carlisle, visit https://www.lizcarlisle.com/
    ​​For more on this episode, including the transcript, visit: https://realfoodmedia.org/portfolio/healing-grounds/
    Join the Real Food Reads book club: https://realfoodmedia.org/programs/real-food-reads/
    Become a Patreon supporter for early access to our episodes and premium content with the authors here https://www.patreon.com/realfoodmedia

    • 34 min
    Taste Makers: Mayukh Sen | Ep. 54

    Taste Makers: Mayukh Sen | Ep. 54

    Taste Makers: Seven Immigrant Women Who Revolutionized Food in America by James Beard award-winning author Mayukh Sen gives us an intimate look into the lives of seven women who’ve changed the way we think about food in the US, while sharing some unique insights into how food media shapes our appetites.

    • 38 min
    Diet for a Small Planet: Frances Moore Lappé | Ep. 53

    Diet for a Small Planet: Frances Moore Lappé | Ep. 53

    Frances Moore Lappé's groundbreaking book in 1971 exposed the true cause of hunger while also changing the way many people eat, for the better. 50 years later, she released a new edition with an updated introduction that speaks to her ethos, what has changed in the last 50 years, and what's next.

    • 32 min
    Inflamed: Dr. Rupa Marya and Raj Patel | Ep. 52

    Inflamed: Dr. Rupa Marya and Raj Patel | Ep. 52

    The Covid pandemic, mass uprisings against injustice around the world, raging forest fires... Our bodies, societies, and planet are inflamed, argue Raj Patel and Dr. Rupa Marya. Their epic and timely new book "Inflamed: Deep Medicine and the Anatomy of Injustice" will forever change the way you think—not only about food—but about the ruptures in the web of life that have wrought so much damage on our health and relationships.

    Rupa is a physician and professor of medicine dedicated to healing the wounds of colonialism through food medicine, story, and learning; and Raj is the best-selling author "Stuffed and Starved," "The Value of Nothing," and co-author of "A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things."

    For more on this episode, visit: https://realfoodmedia.org/portfolio/inflamed/
    Join the Real Food Reads book club: https://realfoodmedia.org/programs/real-food-reads/

    • 38 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
30 Ratings

30 Ratings

ffacee ,

The Food Issues we need to be talking about

FoodTopias is for the people! There’s a lot of podcasts on personal nutrition and fun conversations with superstar chefs, but how many are highlighting food workers at the less glamorous points in the food chain or the people who are actually addressing food injustice in their communities? FoodTopias is filling that need and my ears are so happy to hear it!

a1d1k1 ,

Love this podcast!!

I love this podcast! It gives me hope that we can actually build a more equitable and just world if we apply it to our relationship to food . I always come away having learned something new and I especially loved the Bryant Terry interview and any episode hosted by Tiffani!!

corEy_sb ,

Foodtopias is awesome!

They have incredible guests who are on the front lines of the fight for a more just food system. The interviews are thoughtful. One of my favorite podcasts right now!

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