20 episodes

A podcast for online business builders and growth-minded entrepreneurs.

Repeatable Revenue is hosted by Ray J. Green, an entrepreneurial executive that rose from sales rep to CEO of a private equity backed company, oversaw national small business for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and then left the rat race and successfully drove $70k/mo.+ consulting remotely from Cabo.

This podcast is a collection of interviews, lessons learned, and other infotainment to help you build your business... and the best version of yourself.

Repeatable Revenue Ray J. Green

    • Business
    • 4.6 • 9 Ratings

A podcast for online business builders and growth-minded entrepreneurs.

Repeatable Revenue is hosted by Ray J. Green, an entrepreneurial executive that rose from sales rep to CEO of a private equity backed company, oversaw national small business for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and then left the rat race and successfully drove $70k/mo.+ consulting remotely from Cabo.

This podcast is a collection of interviews, lessons learned, and other infotainment to help you build your business... and the best version of yourself.

    Make an Extra 50K to 100K Commission Every Year with Marcus Chan | Ray J. Green

    Make an Extra 50K to 100K Commission Every Year with Marcus Chan | Ray J. Green

     

    Marcus A. Chan is an influencer, and sales coach helping AE’s + B2B sales pros earn $50K-$100K and more this year and become the Top 1%. In his first business, he built a thriving and growing business. He may have zero funding, but he grew the business exponentially while maintaining industry-leading profit margins.

    His courses and training resources were able to impact thousands of reps around the world with and work with over 300+ sales professionals helping them win at sales and teaching them all the secrets he figured out over the years.

    His success enabled him to get featured in Forbes, Yahoo! Finance, MarketWatch, CNBC, LinkedIn, Entrepreneur, and 100+ industry-leading podcasts, and he is also an executive member of the Forbes Business Council.

    In this episode, Marcus shares how he became a sales coach and teaches sales professionals how to close more and earn more without sleazy tactics or working for more than 60 hours a week. 

     

    Key Takeaways 



    I wish I had a mentor early on, right when I started my business. That would’ve helped me so much more. At this point, I had clarity because I got help. I had someone who has done the game significantly better than me, at a way higher level, way faster. I had micro progression, but the real turning point was getting that coach of Dan Henry telling me that what I’m doing is not a good way to do it, and that’s why it’s not sustainable. 





    If you could do a good job of having a good filter, identify the people you resonate with and what they’ve done, those people you want to follow, and then block everything else out and then execute relentlessly toward whatever they tell you to do. 





    If you solve enough problems eventually you get to where you want to go. Then you start hiring people who do a better job than you were.



     

    Connect with Marcus Chan

    Marcus Chan Website

    6 Figure Sales Secret FREE copy

    LinkedIn

     

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    • 38 min
    5 Ways a Vague Target Market Will Bankrupt You

    5 Ways a Vague Target Market Will Bankrupt You

    Do you have a narrowly defined target market? Did you know that for you to charge a lot of money, your service has to be really effective? And in order for your service to be really effective, it has to solve a specific set of pains, a specific set of problems for a specific target audience. So, you need to identify and define your target market. But if your target market is vague, what are the repercussions to your business?

    Unfortunately, it is one of the causes of sometimes potentially outstanding businesses failing. And it’s the reason solopreneurs, self-employed consultants, and coaches falling into the overworked and underpaid trap, which is usually why they went into business for themselves to begin with, is to escape that.

    In this episode, Ray will share five hidden pains of an undefined or a vague target market. So, if you’ve needed a sign that you’ve got to get clearer on who your target market is, this episode is an eye opener for you.

     

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    • 12 min
    The Checklist I Use to Define a High ROI Niche

    The Checklist I Use to Define a High ROI Niche

     

    Looking at your ideal client profile, Ray can tell how many solopreneurs or service providers enjoy their work, how much money they make, roughly, give or take, and whether or not they burn out a lot. 

    If you have an ideal client profile in place and have it dialed in, and it's evident, you'll get paid a premium to do high-quality work that you like. And if you don't have one, everything you do will feel 3, 5, or 10 times harder. It will be less rewarding because your business is built around your ideal client, and your services will only be valued or valuable to the degree that you're solving your ideal client's problems. 

    What are the things you need to do to build a business, so you're going to get the maximum ROI? Find out in the latest episode of Repeatable Revenue with Ray J. Green.

     

    Key Takeaways


    Entrepreneurs can have a great business if they have an outstanding offer and care about serving an ideal client. 
    Don't build a business around a client doing work that you're just OK at because if you're just adequate at it if you're just OK at doing that work, you can never charge premium prices.
    If your ideal client is committed to making the most of your product or service, you can get case studies to help you increase rates. 

     

     Connect with Ray J. Green

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    • 7 min
    Vision, Strategy, & Luck with Robert Perkins I Ray J. Green

    Vision, Strategy, & Luck with Robert Perkins I Ray J. Green

    When big companies need someone to solve a specific problem, they call on Robert Perkins. Has a unique background and worked with many high performers across different disciplines, including Apple, Michael Dell, Nike, Playboy, Pizza Hut, and Calvin Klein, among other big names. He was an advisor to the top most influential people in Washington.

    In this episode, Rob talks about the importance of consistent management in more prominent organizations, strategy, and does Luck plays a vital role in your success. He believes that the vision influences the decision-making process. Vision requires the willingness to lose a piece of business or money. All visions are grand until somebody says, come to you and tell you you can have your vision or you can have a million dollars. And most people say, take the million dollars. They don't have a vision. They had a convenient idea as long as it worked, but they were onto something else the minute it didn't. But what will you choose? Vision or money? If you select vision, are you committed to it? 

     

    Key Takeaways

     


    Luck plays a more prominent part than we like to admit, but we should never admit it. Then every time you fail, you say I just wasn't lucky. But a lot of people succeeded. So 80% of the work you did wasn't suitable. Not the lack of luck. You have the plan to be successful without luck. And if you get lucky, super, and if you don't get lucky, you still ought to. - Robert Perkins
    Not selling your time doesn't mean not tracking your time. You have to understand where it goes to know whether you're allocating it correctly or not. Google Calendar now has a function called Time Insights. I can look at the end of the week at the pie chart and see how much time I spent on administrative stuff or content creation. I'm less inclined to get distracted because I accurately track and time block more proactively and stick to it in a more disciplined system. - Ray J. Green
    What's my target audience, and what's the slightly bigger target audience? How big is your target audience in the first place, or how do you make it small? As you get successful, how do you grow it organically? How do I convince a company that I have the right solution? You have to educate people that you're smart enough, talk to them, understand their problem as you outline so well, and then think you're the natural person because you've been through this process with them. - Robert Perkins

     

    What strategy do you need to have to expand your target audience? Find out more in the latest episode of Repeatable Revenue with Ray J. Green.

     

    Connect with Ray J. Green

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    Books Mentioned

    Lean Startup: https://amzn.to/3ZgM3Re

    Thinking in Bets - https://amzn.to/3jPblpf

    Competing Against Luck - https://amzn.to/3IoTq2P

    • 1 hr 6 min
    10 Simple Questions to Guide Your Year-End Review I Ray J. Green

    10 Simple Questions to Guide Your Year-End Review I Ray J. Green

    Do you believe in New Year's resolutions? Did you know that about 9% of people successfully keep their New Year's resolutions? Most people quit with the new year's goals before January ends, and more than 40% of people are most likely to give up on their new year's resolution by February. It doesn't mean that the resolutions are a complete waste. If you want a lasting change from those good intentions, then you need better support systems to make them work. This episode will help you work on reflective exercises and actionable plans to effectively make your goals for this year work to your advantage.

     

    Key Takeaways

     

    1. Reflect on one word you would use to describe how you feel about your business. If your business feels rewarding, the focus will be on maintaining or improving that because that makes entrepreneurship sustainable. If the company is bringing you down, then you're on the road to being overwhelmed and burned out, and the focus has to be on changing that.

     

    2. Almost everything you do is habitual. Excellence, then, is an act, not a habit. What are the habits that served you well? What are the practices that you want to develop for the upcoming year?

     

    3. Fast forward, picture yourself 12 months from now, sitting down and going through the same process again. What are three things that, if you have not accomplished, you will feel disappointed in? High performers aren't out there relying on randomness. Ask yourself what needs to happen to ensure you can achieve your goals.

     

    If you want to create realistic resolutions and a workable system that benefits you, listen and take note of the ten simple questions you need to ask yourself if you'll have your breakthrough in the coming Year.

     

    Connect with Ray J. Green

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    • 13 min
    Build For Scale | Ray J. Green

    Build For Scale | Ray J. Green

    Building for scale or getting scalability in your business is reserved for tech entrepreneurs who want to take their business into hypergrowth or build the next unicorn. It is because we talk about scale when we're making for aggressive growth. You're creating for scale is usually associated with an increase. It can include an increase in revenue, growth in your team size, change in your offerings, and growth in the ops. Many service-based businesses or solopreneurs need to consider this concept of scale. "I don't need to," "I have a small one-person business," "I don't need to focus on making it scalable or making certain parts of my business scalable." They go out with that mindset, and they go out and do random acts of marketing. They do, deliver or do customized work for every single engagement they have, thinking that scalability is irrelevant to their business and that it inevitably leads to a plateau. Key Takeaways

    1. Even if you want to stay as a company of just one person or stay as a solopreneur, scalability is still very critical when you work with clients. Building for scale will still be a game changer in your service-related business because it lets you do more work and less time, but you don't have to use the time you get back to get more.

    2. The foundation of a scalable sales process is having a playbook, a talk track, a guide, and a framework that describes how you approach the sales conversation, what you're going to say, how you're going to move prospects through your process.

    3. Sales that scales are different than marketing. You can look for scalability in your business in three areas: marketing, sales, and delivery of the actual service.

    How can you get some scalability in the different areas of your business? Find out how you can scale your business by listening to the latest episode of Repeatable Revenue with Ray J. Green.

     

    Connect with Ray Green

     

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    Download the PLAYBOOK

    • 13 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
9 Ratings

9 Ratings

2020EJN ,

Great Podcast

Learning valuable lessons! Great guests and material references.

REPS0109 ,

Randy Silver - new CRO

I was recommended this podcast as I am newly hired as a CRO. I’ve lead global teams as senior manager, but now I’m “the head guy”. I was told this would help me learn best practices and hear from proven leaders.

This is so true and more! It is great to know I’m doing a lot of the best practices of how to be a great leader. There are new practices in here as well that I’m going to start to incorporate as well.

Thanks Ray for having this podcast. Have made a loyal fan out of me!

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