255 episodes

Welcome to the Run-Run-Live 4.0 Podcast! - This podcast celebrates the transformative power of endurance sports.
This is the next generation follow up to the RunRunLive 2.0 Podcast.
This show is a thoughtful, interview-based format that explores the connection between running, and endurance sports in general and your physical and mental health.
All episodes, show note, links and previous show iterations can be found at www.runrunlive.com

RunRunLive 5.0 - Running Podcast Chris Russell

    • Sports
    • 4.7 • 132 Ratings

Welcome to the Run-Run-Live 4.0 Podcast! - This podcast celebrates the transformative power of endurance sports.
This is the next generation follow up to the RunRunLive 2.0 Podcast.
This show is a thoughtful, interview-based format that explores the connection between running, and endurance sports in general and your physical and mental health.
All episodes, show note, links and previous show iterations can be found at www.runrunlive.com

    11-19-2022

    11-19-2022

    Coming back... 

    • 10 min
    11-05-2022

    11-05-2022

    10-28-2022 Intro: Hello and Welcome to the RunRunLive podcast. I have some incredible updates for you today. As for format, heck, who needs format?  But as a semi-pseudo-format I’m going to keep dropping these short pieces on self-improvement, and especially how to navigate out of a dark place. I’ll do an intro with a little commentary, Then In section one, I’ve got a piece about self-worth. Then I’ll give you my updates in the outro. … Remember last time we talked about navigating the highs and lows of life?  Why? Because I know that a lot of you get the seasonal blues this time of year when the days get cold and dark.  (For you folks in Australia or Brazil; just set this aside and don’t listen for 6 months) I get these low points too. And the way I have learned to work my way out of them is to practice daily self-attention.  I hesitate to call it self-affirmation, or self-love or even self-development.  It’s hard to find words that don’t carry baggage of some sort.  So let’s just say self-attention.  This self-attention is important.  When we find ourselves in these low or challenging spots in our lives we need to systematically focus on ourselves. It may very well be that one of the reasons we are in this low point is that we have neglected self-attention.  We thought we were safely sailing calm waters and we forgot our practice.  As I said in the first piece, these highs and lows come at us throughout our journey.  We tend to enjoy the highs and suffer through the lows.  If you have a good self-care practice you don’t have to suffer through those lows.  You can see those lows as a gift and an opportunity to reassess, reset and replan. Even when everything in your world, our world, seems topsy turvy and out of balance, you are still you and the one thing you have control over is yourself.  This is the gift of self-attention. The bonus of this self-attention is that it makes you better able to deal with the outside world. … Unfortunately, needing to do some self-work is commonly seen as weakness, especially in the western cultures.  At least for my generation.  I’m happy we seem to be evolving beyond that.  Because this stigma on intelligent self-care is a lie.  80% of successful people start their days with some form of self-care.  Those successful people see it for what it is, the daily sharpening of the saw. I think we can recognize that we have these cycles of emotion and energy throughout our lives that are natural.  Feeling guilty or bad about these natural rhythms just compounds the problem. When I get into these troughs I have learned to get back to basics.  To return to the basic truths of who I am and what my values are and what my purpose is.  Then I work with that every morning as part of my routine.  This allows me to show up with my best self for the people who need me.  You are not doing yourself or anyone else any good by showing up incomplete with bad energy. Being in these low spots can be overwhelming. That’s why it is so important to let everything else go for a moment and commit some specific time on your own needs and go back to the basics.  You build yourself up day by day and step by step. I have often heard people say “Life is a marathon, not a sprint” – To which I laugh because what the hell do they know about marathons?  I know about marathons.  We know about marathons.     Remember that first marathon when you got to mile 18 and thought you were going to die?  Hell. I bet more than half of the 70+ marathons I’ve run ended that way.  The first time you hit that wall it’s awful, but eventually, with training and practice you learn how to deal with and overcome the wall.  It’s still awful, but it is a familiar awful that you have the tools to manage. That’s how these cycles of highs and lows work.  That’s why self-care is important because you can develop the tools to work your way through it. To summarize, carve out some

    • 15 min
    Update - 10.21.2022

    Update - 10.21.2022

    Update: Hello my friends, perhaps even my running friends. Welcome to another episode of the comically directionless RunRunLive Podcast.  I think we’re about 14 years into this podcast journey.  It’s funny how time flies… There really weren’t that many of us back in 2007.  It was a small family of runners talking about running with other runners.  It was me, Steve, Nigel, Nic and Dan, Kevin with the extra-milers and Chopper.  And a few others.  I bet, if you asked any of us we’d say we never expected to make money or become famous from it.  But secretly, we all probably did.  Steve probably came the closest.  I think runners were early adopters of the technology as a community because we all spent so much time alone out on the roads. This meant we not only thought too much, but also needed something to listen to.  The perfect storm for running creators.  When I recorded my first show in June of 2007, I had just run down Mount Washington, after running the race up Mount Washington.  I pulled out my little Sony audio recorder and talked about it.  That Episode One would go up over the July 4th weekend that year.  I interviewed my running buddy Frank, who I still hang out with.  I met Frank on a training run with a bunch of marathoners from Boston in the 90’s.  His story, like mine, and like so many others was coming to running later in life, discovering the marathon, then discovering Boston, then getting hooked. And here we are 20+ years later.  I started an interview show because some of the business podcasts that I was listening to at the time had that format.  From the start I diodn’t want the podcast to be about me.  I wanted it to be about the listener.  I wanted to add value.  I wanted to share everything I’d learned, at that point almost a decade into my journey.  I wanted to share the joy of the adventure.  It wasn’t about me, but ironically, I was the target audience.  I gave myself tips and tricks, I gave myself inspirational speeches, I practiced my writing and presentation skills on myself.  Some of you just happened to be along for the ride as well! I didn’t even know there were other running podcasts when I started.  Really, it wasn’t until later that I met everyone.  I remember going on the Runner’s Roundtable and being so nervous.  It was like standing up in front of a big audience.  It’s still a bit strange to me that I have talked into the ears of probably 2-3 million people at this point in time. By the way, all that content, 400+ shows, we could feed that into an AI now and have a very good representation of me.  You probably wouldn’t be able to tell the difference.  It’s a tremendous training data set. Anyhow, enough reminiscing.  I’ve got an few things for you this episode.  First I’ll give you an update on what’s going on in my athletic life. Then I have a book review I wrote for my other podcast – After the Apocalyspe. Finally I’ll share an inspirational piece from a series of articles I’m working on for those of us who get stuck in low points and want to grow out of those. … First for the update.  I think last time I told you that I had thrown my back out lifting weights.  Well, that is still hurting me.  I think because I do a fair amount of chair sitting in my line of work.  I decided to not push it by trying to get back to the gym.  Let it heal.  Instead, I’m doing a daily lower back stretching routine – which seems to help.  I’m willing to share it with you if you like.  Very simple.  I believe I also mentioned that I went back for my follow up with the knee doctor.  I’m 18+ months into this knee injury.  It was first diagnosed as a bruise on the knobby part of my bone.  The knee itself was in reasonable shape, but there was this stress bruise on the bone that showed up on the MRI. I went back to the doctor a couple weeks ago and he did his poking around and sent me for another MRI.  He made sure I di

    • 24 min
    10-7-2022 Ride Update 3

    10-7-2022 Ride Update 3

    Bike Report… Here is a slightly more scripted version of my 2 day ride across Massachusetts.   I scheduled it as a 4-day adventure.  This is one of those things that you learn from doing long or hard or ultra-type events.  Give yourself some buffer time. I have always violated this rule.  Partly because my life has always been busy, or I have convinced myself that it was, and I had to rush to get to events and then rush back.  I have always tried to not be that guy who talks too much about this stuff at work.  I realized early on that this is my obsession, and the rest of the world may or may not give a shit.  I’ve been more than willing to talk about it in depth when asked, or in this purpose-built forum for that outlet, but I have always taken pains not to be THAT GUY in the office.  As a result, most of the people I’ve worked with know vaguely that I train all the time, but seldom have the gift of knowing exactly what or when I’m doing an event.  That vagueness allows work activity to crowd around the events and I find myself running a marathon in the morning and jumping on a plane in the afternoon.  I think it also fits that egoistic self-image I have had of being the indestructible man that can pop in and out of events that other people can’t even fathom.  Even my acts of humility are ego-centric! There are advantages to not buffering time around an event.  If you show up just in time for the event it doesn’t give you time to think too much about it.  You can get much more adventure in the day by not being prepared and not knowing the course, etc.  Just show up doesn’t fit many peoples’ brains but I enjoy the adventure of it.  If you jet off after the event you don’t have time to wallow in your misery. But the disadvantages of this cramming in events, especially big events, are manifold.  You can make mistakes that you could have avoided by being just a bit more prepared.  Like, for instance, not thinking about how the temperature drops below freezing in the mountains at night.  And, most regretfully, you don’t really get a chance to let it sink in.  Many of those races I’ve run are just blurry memories of a fast weekend spent somewhere doing something hard.  I’ve found that no matter how good shape you’re in, a multi-day event will mess with your thinking ability.  It’s best to take a day off after because you’re going to be useless anyhow. For this ride, I took 4 days off to ride around 250 miles in 2 days.  I enlisted my wife to crew for me.  I suppose this is one of the advantages of having a long-term relationship.  You can just casually drop something like this… “Hey, take Friday and Monday off we’re going out to Western Mass and you’re going to follow me while I ride across the state for 2 days.” And that doesn’t end the relationship.  … Day one was Friday.  We got up and I took Ollie down to the local kennel when it opened at 9AM.  This was Ollie’s first time being kenneled – so it was a bit like first day of school for your kids.  I had a pang of sadness driving back to the house in my truck with the passenger seat empty.  I had done my best to make sure all my stuff was organized.  We drove out a pretty section of Rte 2 west into the Berkshires and the Mohawk Trail.  Western Mass is a pretty place.  All hills and farms and little; towns. Those same little towns that you’ll find in Vermont or New Hampshire.  A bit of a tourist trap but really pretty without being entirely off the map. We took the new truck with my bike in the back. I prepped my bike earlier in the week.  I washed it and cleaned the chain and derailleurs as best I could.  It’s a messy and dirty job.  It requires using a degreaser and a toothbrush.  Kids, this degreaser chemical is very dangerous.  Remember to wear rubber gloves and safety glasses when you’re cleaning your bike chain.  Once you get it all sparkly clean then you can rub a little bike gre

    • 30 min
    Misc - 9-23-2022

    Misc - 9-23-2022

    An update

    • 26 min
    9-12-2022

    9-12-2022

    Ride report part one... and update. 

    • 22 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
132 Ratings

132 Ratings

Another Older Mother Runner ,

What BBounous said, in review below

I’m pretty sure I have listened to every episode & am always happy to see a new episode in my feed. Chris is such a great teacher, leader, & all-around fun running buddy. “I’ll see you out there.”

BBounous ,

One of the first, One of the best

Relatable and insightful. Not a gear head and not a perfectionist. Also has some published works directed to mid-packers. He is the guy you want to be in a running club with. Optimistic and cheerful but knows his limits and values coaching. Occasionally is a dork, occasionally gets hurt. Pretty much a guy you want to know.

Runner1208 ,

My first podcast and still the best

I have listened to all the back episodes to catch up and always want more. Chris always has good topics. No matter what i am listening to when a new RRL drops i go straight to it!

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