224 episodes

The Human Biology Association is a vibrant nonprofit scientific organization dedicated to supporting and disseminating innovative research and teaching on human biological variation in evolutionary, social, historical, and environmental context worldwide.

Sausage of Science Human Biology Association

    • Science
    • 4.9 • 16 Ratings

The Human Biology Association is a vibrant nonprofit scientific organization dedicated to supporting and disseminating innovative research and teaching on human biological variation in evolutionary, social, historical, and environmental context worldwide.

    SoS 217: Dr. Azcorra Pérez Shares Insights on Nutritional Ecology and Bonsai Farming

    SoS 217: Dr. Azcorra Pérez Shares Insights on Nutritional Ecology and Bonsai Farming

    Special guest hosts Cristina and Miguel Ochoa unpack the nutritional ecology with Dr. Hugo Azcorra-Pérez, a human biologist at Centro de Investigaciones Silvio Zavala, Universidad Modelo, Mérida, Yucatán, Mexico. He is interested in the biology of populations during the early stages of growth and development and how environmental factors and intergenerational influences shape biological conditions. Born in Yucatán, México, he holds a Master of Sciences in Human Ecology and a Ph.D. in Human Biology (Loughborough University, UK). His research focuses on human growth and its variation according to economic and sociocultural variables. In his Ph.D. work, he assessed how intergenerational factors influence Maya families' development and nutritional status, particularly the phenomenon of nutritional dual-burden (i.e., the coexistence of undernutrition and overweight within the same family or individual). These interests have continued through his current work, which focuses on how the chronic adverse living conditions experienced by Maya populations from Yucatan have impacted their biology and health outcomes.

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    Find the paper discussed in this episode:

    Azcorra, H., Castillo-Burguete, M. T., Lara-Riegos, J., Salazar-Rendón, J. C., & Mendez-Dominguez, N. (2024). Secular trends in the anthropometric characteristics of children in a rural community in Yucatan, Mexico. American Journal of Human Biology, 36(2), e23995. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajhb.23995
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    Contact Dr. Azcorra-Pérez: hugoazpe@hotmail.com
    Twitter: @AzcorraHugo and on Facebook: facebook.com/hugo.azcorra/
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    Contact the Sausage of Science Podcast and Human Biology Association:
    Facebook: facebook.com/groups/humanbiologyassociation/, Website: humbio.org, Twitter: @HumBioAssoc

    Cristina Gildee, Guest Co-Host; HBA Junior Fellow; SoS producer
    Website: cristinagildee.org, E-mail: cgildee@uw.edu, Twitter:@CristinaGildee

    Miguel Ochoa, Guest Co-Host
    E-mail: mochoa88@uw.edu, Twitter:@Miguel_Ochoa88

    • 42 min
    SoS 216: Claire Gold - Breastfeeding, Menarche, and Consequences

    SoS 216: Claire Gold - Breastfeeding, Menarche, and Consequences

    Chris and Courtney host Claire Gold, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Anthropology at The University of Massachusetts, Amherst, where she studies the life histories and diet of the women and children from a Medieval Italian population. Claire received her MA in Biological Anthropology from the State University of New York, Binghamton, where she focused on the reproductive correlates of reproductive cancers. Since then, she has raised three children with her husband. In 2019, Claire decided to pursue her PhD at 45 to continue contributing to relevant research on women's and children’s health. She is interested in early life events in modern humans and archaeological populations. Claire is a member of the Society for American Archaeology, the American Association of Biological Anthropologists, the Human Biology Association, the American Investigative Society of Cold Cases, and the International Society for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health.

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    Find the works discussed in this episode:

    Gold, C. L., & Bertone‐Johnson, E. (2024). Self‐reported history of breastfeeding in relation to recalled age at menarche in the United States. American Journal of Human Biology, e24067.

    Gold, C. L., Kitrinos, C. E., Sievert, L. L., & Kamilar, J. M. (2023). Mean age at menarche and climate variables on a global scale. American Journal of Human Biology, 35(12), e23961.

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    Contact Claire: cgold@umass.edu
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    Contact the Sausage of Science Podcast and Human Biology Association:
    Facebook: facebook.com/groups/humanbiologyassociation/, Website: humbio.org, Twitter: @HumBioAssoc

    Chris Lynn, Co-Host Website: cdlynn.people.ua.edu/, E-mail: cdlynn@ua.edu, Twitter:@Chris_Ly

    Courtney Manthey-Peirce, Guest-Co-Host, Website: holylaetoli.com/ E-mail: cpierce4@uccs.edu, Twitter: @HolyLaetoli

    Cristina Gildee, HBA Junior Fellow, SoS producer
    Website: cristinagildee.org, E-mail: cgildee@uw.edu, Twitter:@CristinaGildee

    • 39 min
    SoS 215: Taiye Winful Investigates the Embodiment of Stress in Nigeria

    SoS 215: Taiye Winful Investigates the Embodiment of Stress in Nigeria

    Chris and Cristina interview Taiye Winful, a PhD Candidate at Vanderbilt University, who studies stress and embodiment in African and other Black populations. Taiye completed her bachelor's degree in Molecular Biology from Loyola University Chicago and MA degree in Anthropology from The University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Taiye’s Master’s thesis was titled “Reconstructing Africa’s Evolutionary Histories: DNA Collection, Coding, Analysis, and Interpretation.” Her thesis focused on generating a comprehensive bio-culturally informed set of African DNA databases that reflected continental and diasporic African genomic diversity. Taiye’s current research interests include genetics, race, health, embodiment, and health disparities. Her dissertation focuses on understanding how life experiences translate into physiological systems via stress in Black populations. She explores the biological mechanisms that connect stress and health, specifically focusing on how social and environmental factors can lead to epigenetic changes in inflammatory-related biomarkers.

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    Find the works discussed in this episode:

    Winful, Taiye, "Bioethics as a Dynamic Issue: Holistic Approaches to Understanding and Applying Ethics to Study Design" (2024). Human Biology Open Access Pre-Prints. 208.
    https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/humbiol_preprints/208

    Winful, T.; Sorunke, M.; Benn Torres, J. “The Impacts of Stress on Salivary CRP Variability in a Nigerian Population” (in prep).

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    Contact Taiye: olawunmi.winful@vanderbilt.edu
    Twitter: @twinanthro
    ------------------------------
    Contact the Sausage of Science Podcast and Human Biology Association:
    Facebook: facebook.com/groups/humanbiologyassociation/, Website: humbio.org, Twitter: @HumBioAssoc

    Chris Lynn, Co-Host
    Website: cdlynn.people.ua.edu/, E-mail: cdlynn@ua.edu, Twitter:@Chris_Ly

    Cristina Gildee, Guest Co-Host, HBA Junior Fellow, SoS producer
    Website: cristinagildee.org, E-mail: cgildee@uw.edu, Twitter:@CristinaGildee

    • 35 min
    SoS 214: Prof. Julienne Rutherford talks about marmoset births and human pelvises

    SoS 214: Prof. Julienne Rutherford talks about marmoset births and human pelvises

    How can marmosets inform human birth experiences? Are there really four types of human pelvises? What happens when primates birth litters?

    Prof. Julienne Rutherford joins Chris and Eric to answer these questions and more!

    Find the articles discussed on this episode via the following citations:

    Rutherford, J.N., Ross, C.N., Ziegler, T., Burke, L.A., Steffen, A.D., Sills, A., Layne Colon, D., Demartelly, V.A., Narapareddy, L.R. and Tardif, S.D., 2021. Womb to womb: Maternal litter size and birth weight but not adult characteristics predict early neonatal death of offspring in the common marmoset monkey. Plos one, 16(6), p.e0252093.

    VanSickle, C., Liese, K.L. and Rutherford, J.N., 2022. Textbook typologies: challenging the myth of the perfect obstetric pelvis. The Anatomical Record, 305(4), pp.952-967.

    ----------------------------------------------------

    Dr. Julienne Rutherford is Professor and John & Nell Mitchell Endowed Chair for Pediatric Nursing in the University of Arizona College of Nursing. She is a biological anthropologist whose work integrates bioanthropological theory with biomedical science. For 20 years, she has sustained a program of research exploring the intrauterine environment as a biosocial determinant of health. She studies how maternal life history and lived experience shape this earliest developmental setting, and how, in turn, the intrauterine environment influences growth, health, and development across the life course and across generations.

    ----------------------------------------------------

    Contact the Sausage of Science Podcast and Human Biology Association:

    Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/humanbiologyassociation
    Website: humbio.org/, Twitter: @HumBioAssoc

    Chris Lynn, HBA Public Relations Committee Chair
    Website: cdlynn.people.ua.edu/, E-mail: cdlynn at ua.edu, Twitter:@Chris_Ly

    Eric Griffith, HBA Junior Fellow, SoS producer
    E-mail: eric.griffith at duke.edu

    • 55 min
    SoS 213: Prof. Gregoricka Discusses the Ethics of Legacy Collections and Other Bioarch. Topics

    SoS 213: Prof. Gregoricka Discusses the Ethics of Legacy Collections and Other Bioarch. Topics

    Prof. Lesley Gregoricka joins Chris and Eric to explain her work in the field of bioarchaeology. Topics include everything from strontium isotope analysis to the ethics of legacy collections of human remains. Stick around for a diversion to King Cakes and Mardis Gras.

    The article discussed on this episode can be found via this citation:

    Gregoricka, L. A. (2023). The ethics of excavating: bioarchaeology and the case for rehabilitating legacy human skeletal collections in the Near East. Levant, 55(3), 294-303.

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    Bioarchaeologist Dr. Lesley Gregoricka is a Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work at the University of South Alabama. Her research focuses on prehistoric mortuary practices and the chemistry of ancient human teeth and bones to examine changing patterns of mobility and the evolution of social complexity in Arabia and the broader Middle East.

    -------------------------------------------------------------

    Contact the Sausage of Science Podcast and Human Biology Association:

    Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/humanbiologyassociation
    Website: humbio.org/, Twitter: @HumBioAssoc

    Chris Lynn, HBA Public Relations Committee Chair
    Website: cdlynn.people.ua.edu/, E-mail: cdlynn at ua.edu, Twitter:@Chris_Ly

    Eric Griffith, HBA Junior Fellow, SoS producer
    E-mail: eric.griffith at duke.edu

    • 38 min
    SoS 212: Melanie Martin talks mother-infant COVID-19 transmission and social jetlag

    SoS 212: Melanie Martin talks mother-infant COVID-19 transmission and social jetlag

    Chris and Eric catch up with Dr. Melanie Martin, an Associate Professor in the University of Washington Department of Anthropology, whose research examines biocultural influences on health, growth, and development across the life course. In addition to being the Co-PI of the Biodemography Lab at the University of Washington Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology, she conducts field research with two international projects on Indigenous community health and well-being: the Chaco Area Reproductive Ecology Program (Co-Director) and the Tsimane Health and Life History Project (Affiliate). In this episode, Dr. Martin breaks down two of her papers, one looking at COVID-19 transmission in mothers and infants and another examining sleep health in undergraduates before and during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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    Find the papers discussed in this episode:

    Martin MA, Keith M, Pace RM, Williams JE, Ley SH, Barbosa-Leiker C, Caffé B, Smith CB, Kunkle A, Lackey KA, Navarrete AD, Pace CDW, Gogel AC, Eisenberg DTA, Fehrenkamp BD, McGuire MA, McGuire MK, Meehan CL and Brindle E (2022) SARS-CoV-2 specific antibody trajectories in mothers and infants over two months following maternal infection. Front. Immunol. 13:1015002. https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2022.1015002

    Alicia Rice, Olivia Sather, Kenneth P Wright, Céline Vetter, Melanie A Martin, Horacio O de la Iglesia, COVID-19 stay-at-home restrictions increase the alignment in sleep and light exposure between school days and weekends in university students, Sleep, Volume 46, Issue 7, July 2023, zsad059, https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsad059
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    Contact Melanie: martinm7@uw.edu
    Website: https://www.melaniemartin-anthropologist.com/
    ------------------------------
    Contact the Sausage of Science Podcast and Human Biology Association:
    Facebook: facebook.com/groups/humanbiologyassociation/, Website: humbio.org, Twitter: @HumBioAssoc

    Chris Lynn, Co-Host,
    Website: cdlynn.people.ua.edu/, E-mail: cdlynn@ua.edu, Twitter:@Chris_Ly
    Eric Griffith, Guest Co-Host, HBA Junior Fellow
    E-mail: eric.griffith@duke.edu

    Cristina Gildee, HBA Junior Fellow, SoS producer
    Website: cristinagildee.org, E-mail: cgildee@uw.edu, Twitter:@CristinaGildee

    • 37 min

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16 Ratings

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