179 episodes

Twice a week, the Guardian brings you the latest science and environment news.

Science Weekly The Guardian

    • Science
    • 4.3 • 290 Ratings

Twice a week, the Guardian brings you the latest science and environment news.

    Why is the NHS in crisis, and can it be fixed?

    Why is the NHS in crisis, and can it be fixed?

    The UK’s new health secretary, Thérèse Coffey, has not taken on an easy job. Almost two-thirds of trainee GPs plan to work part-time just a year after they qualify, reporting that the job has become too intense to safely work more. A record 6.8 million people are waiting for hospital treatment in England, and 132,139 posts lie vacant across the NHS in England. Ian Sample hears from acute medicine consultant Dr Tim Cooksley about what’s happening within the NHS, and speaks to the Guardian’s health policy editor, Denis Campbell, about how the UK’s health and social care systems ended up in crisis and whether they can be fixed. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 16 min
    How will Jacob Rees-Mogg tackle the energy and climate crises?

    How will Jacob Rees-Mogg tackle the energy and climate crises?

    Against a backdrop of a cost of living crisis caused in part by soaring energy prices, the UK’s new prime minister, Liz Truss, appointed MP Jacob Rees-Mogg as secretary of state for business and energy. In this role, Rees-Mogg will have to tackle these issues while being responsible for the UK’s legally binding target of net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. It is a goal he has previously described as ‘a long way off’. Madeleine Finlay hears from environment correspondent Fiona Harvey about his plans to extract ‘every last drop’ of oil and gas from the North Sea, the possibility of fracking in the UK, and the importance of energy efficiency and renewables in addressing the cost of living, energy and climate crises together. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 17 min
    How air pollution is changing our view of cancer

    How air pollution is changing our view of cancer

    According to the World Health Organisation, air pollution causes 7 million premature deaths every year. We’ve known for a long time that air pollution causes lots of health problems, including lung cancer – but exactly how the two were linked was somewhat of mystery. Last week, a team from the Francis Crick Institute and University College London presented findings that shed new light on the role between air pollution and lung cancer. And, in doing so, could make us rethink how cancer develops. Madeleine Finlay speaks to the Guardian’s science correspondent Hannah Devlin about how scientists uncovered this link – and what it might mean for the future of the field.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 11 min
    Why do we grieve the death of public figures?

    Why do we grieve the death of public figures?

    As we collectively mark the loss of the longest-serving monarch in British history and all that she represented on a national scale, many people are feeling a much more personal impact. The Guardian’s science editor, Ian Sample, talks to Prof Michael Cholbi about what grief is, how losing a public figure can have such a profound impact on our lives,​​ and why there’s value in grieving. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 11 min
    Could a new vaccine tackle rising rates of Lyme disease?

    Could a new vaccine tackle rising rates of Lyme disease?

    According to a recent study, more than 14% of the world’s population probably has, or has had, tick-borne Lyme disease – an infection that can cause long and debilitating symptoms. That number is set to rise too, as climate and environment changes continue to increase tick populations and distribution. To help prevent some of these cases, pharmaceutical company Pfizer and biotech company Valneva will soon be testing a new vaccine against Lyme disease with 6,000 volunteers across Europe and in the US. Madeleine Finlay speaks to Dr Eoin Healy about what Lyme disease is and how the vaccine works, and hears from a special guest about their own experience of getting ill with the disease.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 16 min
    What could go wrong at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant?

    What could go wrong at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant?

    Last week, a team of inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) arrived at Ukraine’s Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant. The plant was seized by Russian forces in early May and has recently been the target of sustained shelling, increasing the risk of a nuclear disaster. The head of the IAEA, Rafael Grossi, who is leading the inspection team, has reported that the integrity of the plant has been violated several times. Ian Sample speaks to Prof Claire Corkhill about what this could mean for Zaporizhzhia, what the risks are if the plant loses external power, and how a nuclear meltdown can be avoided. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 13 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
290 Ratings

290 Ratings

D20chick ,

Quality

Pacing is good, thoroughy enjoyable for those topics you already have an interest in.

moving on-missu ,

Learn here

SCIFRI science Friday was a go to but they became political and now lacks real discussion and learning. This program well worth your time.

Sir_Prometheus. ,

Whole episode about politics, no science.

1) if you label yourself a science show, don’t talk about Russian - Ukrainian info wars. No pretext of science at all

2) DEFINITELY don’t be a buncha British people trying to analyze US politics. We actually have free speech here, but that doesn’t make it in good taste.

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