198 episodes

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Science Weekly podcast will now explore some of the crucial scientific questions about Covid-19. Led by its usual hosts  Ian Sample,  Hannah Devlin and  Nicola Davis, as well as the Guardian's health editor Sarah Boseley, we’ll be taking questions – some sent by you – to experts on the frontline of the global outbreak. Send us your questions here:  theguardian.com/covid19questions  

Science Weekly The Guardian

    • Science
    • 4.4, 211 Ratings

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Science Weekly podcast will now explore some of the crucial scientific questions about Covid-19. Led by its usual hosts  Ian Sample,  Hannah Devlin and  Nicola Davis, as well as the Guardian's health editor Sarah Boseley, we’ll be taking questions – some sent by you – to experts on the frontline of the global outbreak. Send us your questions here:  theguardian.com/covid19questions  

    Covid-19: Why are people suffering long-term symptoms?

    Covid-19: Why are people suffering long-term symptoms?

    Weeks and months after having a confirmed or suspected Covid-19 infection, many people are finding they still haven’t fully recovered. Emerging reports describe lingering symptoms ranging from fatigue and brain-fog to breathlessness and tingling toes. So why does Covid-19 cause lasting health problems? Ian Sample discusses some of the possible explanations with Prof Danny Altmann, and finds out how patients might be helped in the future. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 15 min
    Hubble at 30: a view into our cosmos

    Hubble at 30: a view into our cosmos

    Thirty years ago, the Hubble space telescope was shuttled into orbit, and has since provided us with astonishing images and insights into the universe. Earlier this year, Hannah Devlin spoke to one of the astronauts who helped launch Hubble, Kathy Sullivan. The first American woman to walk in space, Sullivan describes her journey to becoming an astronaut, why Hubble was such a vital mission and why it continues to be so important today. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 17 min
    Covid-19: why R is a lot more complicated than you think

    Covid-19: why R is a lot more complicated than you think

    Over the last few months, we’ve all had to come to terms with R, the ‘effective reproduction number’, as a measure of how well we are dealing with the coronavirus outbreak. But, as Nicola Davis finds out from Dr Adam Kucharski, R is a complicated statistical concept that relies on many factors and, under some conditions, can be misleading. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 13 min
    The Durrington shafts: a remarkable discovery for Stonehenge's neighbour

    The Durrington shafts: a remarkable discovery for Stonehenge's neighbour

    Archaeologists surveying the land around Stonehenge have made a discovery that could change the way we think about our neolithic ancestors: a circle of deep shafts spanning 1.2 miles in diameter around Durrington Walls. Hannah Devlin speaks to Prof Vincent Gaffney about how he and his team made this incredible discovery and why the latest find is so remarkable. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 14 min
    Covid-19: how worried should smokers be?

    Covid-19: how worried should smokers be?

    With reports that there are lower rates of smokers being admitted to hospital with Covid-19 in France and trials to test whether nicotine patches can reduce the severity of infection, but also data showing that smokers are more likely to contract the disease and develop severe symptoms, what’s actually going on here? Sarah Boseley talks to Dr Nick Hopkinson to find out more. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 12 min
    How cephalopod cells could take us one step closer to invisibility

    How cephalopod cells could take us one step closer to invisibility

    Watching the mesmerising patterns of squids, octopuses and cuttlefish has been the catalyst for much of Dr Alon Gorodetsky’s recent work, including his attempts to mimic their ability to become transparent. Nicola Davis talks to him about a recent paper where he engineered mammalian cells to share these optic properties - paving the way for exciting potential applications. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 15 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
211 Ratings

211 Ratings

D20chick ,

Quality

Pacing is good, thoroughy enjoyable for those topics you already have an interest in.

brainzmatter ,

Much diminished

Back when this was hosted by Alok Jah, it was my fave podcast. Ian Sample is good but apparently not considered for taking over. Instead they’ve added a couple of poorly spoken girls—yes they present as girls, not women— who do embarrassingly trite interviews. The whole thing has become fragmented and dull. I delete most of them these days. Now we are told that we shall have “science without the scientists” and just go about asking “real people” what they think! Ugh! I’m done—DELETED.

Jessica1975 ,

Once great, now has shady sponsors

Just finished listening to the episode on coral reefs and was very disappointed to learn that Dominion Energy (which relies on fossil fuels) and Toyota (which is siding with tRump as he guts fuel efficiency standards) are sponsoring the podcast. I thought The Guardian was a leader in informing the world on the climate crisis. With sponsors like these, how can we trust its content on climate?

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