92 episodes

The Scienceline podcast is produced by the Science, Health and Environmental Reporting Program in the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at New York University. For more information, e-mail us at scienceline@gmail.com.

Scienceline Scienceline

    • Science
    • 5.0 • 8 Ratings

The Scienceline podcast is produced by the Science, Health and Environmental Reporting Program in the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at New York University. For more information, e-mail us at scienceline@gmail.com.

    Yet another road to this great ape’s extinction

    Yet another road to this great ape’s extinction

    Chimpanzees are nearing extinction in many countries. Of the four subspecies of these great apes, western chimpanzees are the most endangered. Experts estimate that their distribution is now extremely patchy, with 80% of their numbers having declined in the last 20 years. The largest-remaining population is found in the Ivory Coast in Western Africa, with smaller populations in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau and Liberia. 

    Poaching and habitat loss are some of the well-known threats to chimpanzees. But a study published last September finds that road developments are exacerbating their population decline. Noise pollution emanating from the construction of roads and poachers gaining access to more remote locations are some of the reasons to blame. A team of primate conservationists have quantified the extent to which roads jeopardize their communities. They say that just about 4.5% of the chimp population are left unaffected by roads. 

    On this episode of the Scienceline podcast, reporter Niranjana Rajalakshmi speaks with primate behavior experts who suggest a few strategies that could mitigate the impact of roads on western chimpanzees. 

    Find more information at Scienceline.org

    • 7 min
    Climate change on the global stage

    Climate change on the global stage

    Thinking about climate change can be overwhelming, even paralyzing. Attempting to solve this global crisis will take enormous efforts by politicians, companies and local leaders to reverse the negative effects on our planet. 

    On this global stage, where can artistic expression fit into our response and communication efforts? Enter climate change theater — an effort by playwrights, educators and scientists to spread information and awareness about the impacts of human behavior on the environment. While filled with serious themes of melting ice caps and polluted waterways, these plays also offer hope for a positive future.

    Join Scienceline reporter Hannah Loss on a trip up the Hudson Valley as she experiences a global series of storytelling and live performances organized by Climate Change Theatre Action.

    You can read more on our website: https://scienceline.org/2022/03/climate-change-on-the-global-stage/

    Music:

    Bedtime Story for My (future) Daughter by Caity-Shea Violette, performed by Hudson River Playback Theatre

    The Oysters, by Miranda Rose Hall, performed by Andrew Brehm, Eric Magnus and Liz Zito

    • 8 min
    Do stutterers always stutter? Not really

    Do stutterers always stutter? Not really

    What do Tiger Woods, Michelle Williams and President Joe Biden all have in common? Like around 3 million people in the United States, they are all people who stutter.

    Stuttering commonly develops around childhood and most people stop stuttering by the time they reach adulthood. However, stuttering persists for some adults and researchers haven’t been able to figure out why. But findings from a recent study may get them one step closer to finding out: Adults don’t stutter when they talk alone.

    Join Scienceline reporter Kharishar Kahfi as he learns more about the communication disorder and what the new discovery adds to the field of stuttering research.

    You can read more on our website: https://scienceline.org/2022/03/do-stutterers-always-stutter-not-really/

    Music:
    Thinking Music by Kevin MacLeod | Filmmusic.io Standard License
    Western Streets by Kevin MacLeod | Filmmusic.io Standard License

    Sound effect:
    Phone Ringing by acclivity | CC BY 3.0

    • 7 min
    What we gain by exercising together

    What we gain by exercising together

    The Central Park Running Club meets on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 6:30 in the morning. Not much stops them from starting their days together with an early morning jaunt through the park — not cold, not rain and not even January’s big snowstorm. 

    What’s so special about exercising together that it gets these intrepid Central Park runners out of bed and onto the road each week? In this episode of the Scienceline podcast, Emily talks to runners, a neuroscientist and a health psychologist to find out. 

    Find more information at Scienceline.org: https://scienceline.org/2022/02/what-we-gain-by-exercising-together/

    Music: 

    Springtime After a Long Winter by Azovmusic | End-User License Agreement

    Sound Effects:

    Guitar: Alexander Nakarada | CC BY 4.0

    • 8 min
    How Tuvan vocalists sing two notes at once

    How Tuvan vocalists sing two notes at once

    The Republic of Tuva, located in the Russian Federation, is known across the world for its music. If you’ve ever heard Tuvan vocalists sing, you’ll understand why. A piercing whistle hovers over a deep, buzzing drone — two very different sounds coming from the same singer’s vocal tract as he harmonizes with himself.

    So how do these master vocalists sing two notes at once? The answer lies in the most fundamental principles of sound. And in theory, anyone can learn to do it. 

    On this episode of the Scienceline podcast, experience the captivating beauty of Tuvan throat singing and the physics that makes it possible.

    You can find more information on Scienceline: https://scienceline.org/2022/02/how-tuvan-vocalists-sing-two-notes-at-once/

    Effects:
    Acoustic data from Bergevin et al. (2020) | Used with permission

    Music:
    ”My Throat” by Alash | Used with permission
    ”Karachal” by Alash | Used with permission

    • 8 min
    Fighting Fast Fashion

    Fighting Fast Fashion

    Sometimes, being a “material girl” comes with a downside. An endless cycle of fashion trends doesn’t only weigh on your wallet; it takes a toll on the planet too.

    In 2020, the fashion industry accounted for 10% of the world’s carbon emissions, which is more than the oceanic shipping and international flight industries combined. If current practices continue undeterred, experts predict emissions will only increase.

    Just like the larger issue of climate change, the path to fixing the fashion industry is disagreed upon. The good news? There are personal changes you can make to your shopping habits and potential policy changes that could help.

    Scienceline reporter Maiya Focht dives deeper into the fast fashion industry, giving you an overview of the most important trend: caring for the environment.

    More information on Scienceline.org: https://scienceline.org/2022/02/fighting-fast-fashion/

    MUSIC USED IN ORDER:
    Dark Fog by Kevin MacLeod | Filmmusic.io standard license
    Raving Energy by Kevin MacLeod | Filmmusic.io standard license
    Beauty Flow by Kevin MacLeod | Filmmusic.io standard license

    SOUND EFFECTS
    Newscast waterfall:
    Vice News
    Teen Vogue
    DW Documentary
    MTV Impact
    CBS News

    Trend waterfall:
    Sisters Forever
    Kerina Wang
    Model Mouth
    Katelyn Dewitt
    Laini Ozark

    • 8 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
8 Ratings

8 Ratings

Mesmilized ,

Great, short science stories

I love how these episodes get right to point but are still informative! Well produced and researched.

YGlen ,

Highly Recommended for the Science Enthusiast.

Learning has never been so easy!

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More Please!

Great Science Podcast on DNA! Awesome job, keep it up!

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