35 episodes

Epic histories from the Indian subcontinent, through the eyes of the marginalized. Hear about ruthless emperors, cunning corporations that colonized half the world, a world-renowned sci-fi writer who stumbled on a treasure ship, and other stories from history, science and cultures. Presented in 3-D sound to immerse you in the past. Hosted by journalists Gayathri Vaidyanathan and Mary-Rose Abraham, who reflect on how these histories define the present.

Scrolls & Leaves: World History Podcast Scrolls & Leaves Podcast

    • History
    • 5.0 • 12 Ratings

Epic histories from the Indian subcontinent, through the eyes of the marginalized. Hear about ruthless emperors, cunning corporations that colonized half the world, a world-renowned sci-fi writer who stumbled on a treasure ship, and other stories from history, science and cultures. Presented in 3-D sound to immerse you in the past. Hosted by journalists Gayathri Vaidyanathan and Mary-Rose Abraham, who reflect on how these histories define the present.

    Rerun: Nature's Voice - Tuvan Throat Singing

    Rerun: Nature's Voice - Tuvan Throat Singing

    Season 1, End-of-Year Bonus

    Nature's Voice: Tuvan Throat Singing















    From the mountains of Central Asia comes a musical form that borrows extensively from Nature. In this episode, we talk to Tuvan vocalist and composer, Saylyk Ommun, about Tuvan throat singing and its links with the natural world and modern genres like rock.



    This episode was chosen as one of the "100 Outstanding Podcasts From 2021" by Bello Collective, one of the most influential voices in podcasting.



    Reviewer Arielle Nissenblatt said: “In less than thirty minutes, I was transported to a place I’ve never heard of, and learned of music and traditions that I’d never been exposed to previously. This episode so beautifully mixes audio with music while telling a story and celebrating a community of people.”



    Time Markers (min:sec)



    00:43 – Sample of Tuvan throat singing

    01:05 – Sasha's first memory of Tuvan music

    01:26 – Who is Saylyk Ommun?

    01:56 – Saylyk singing “Çavıdak”

    02:30 – What the episode's about

    03:47 – Saylyk’s childhood

    04:24 – Saylyk’s joins Yat-Kha

    06:40 – Tuvan throat singing and nature

    08:26 – Women practicing throat singing today

    09:21 – Throat singing listening exercise

    10:03 – What is timbre?

    11:01 – Description of throat singing styles

    11:24 – Kargyraa style

    15:17 – Xoomei style

    16:08 – Sygyt style

    17:03 – Borbangnadyr

    17:29 – Ezenggileer

    17:48 – Xoomei style with both techniques at once

    18:05 – Throat singing is sculpting sound and its scientific explanations

    18:34 – Saylyk sings “Ezir-Kara”

    18:55 – The rich and complex use of timbre in Tuvan music

    20:24 – Saylyk discusses Tuvan folk songs and her grandmother’s singing

    21:09 – Saylyk sings a folk song her grandmother sang to her

    22:09 – Lets think of Nature in new ways

















    Guests

    Saylyk Ommun

    Sasha Semina







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    Hey you! Have you signed up for our free letter? This *isn't* a marketing email! We'll send you additional content and links for each episode, and updates about our podcast.

    • 26 min
    Trade Winds Season Trailer

    Trade Winds Season Trailer

    Not many people know of histories from the majority world, where 80% of all people live. We will tell you some of these stories in Season 1, Trade Winds. Each episode tells a story set on the Indian Ocean as global civilizations connect with South Asia. Hear about the episodes coming up this season.

    • 2 min
    3 Ways Indigenous Knowledge Saves Biodiversity

    3 Ways Indigenous Knowledge Saves Biodiversity

    Season 1, Chatroom 19



    3 Ways Indigenous Wisdom Protects Biodiversity















    Indigenous people’s take on the world’s biodiversity varies very much from Western science. For example, traditional societies believe that Nature is interconnected and we can commune with all living beings. In this conception, humans are a part of a bigger whole. This relationship with nature can protect the world’s biodiversity, as evidenced by a startling statistic -- more than 80% of the world’s remaining intact biodiversity is on indigenous land. 



    In this bonus episode, we speak with Tero Mustonen, a geographer and lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)’s landmark report on climate change released last month. Mustonen is also the head of the Selkie village in Finland.



    Mustonen tells us about what biodiversity is in indigenous systems, and how the approach taken by Western science to understand Nature is limited by what scientists can measure. Indigenous communities can contribute to science, and guide scientists and policymakers about the right choices to make.

    Time Markers (mins: sec)







    * 00:41 - Tero Mustonen intro

    * 1:13 - Ask the bees!

    * 2:00 - Intro to the episode

    * 3:07 - Convention on Biological Diversity

    * 3:42 - How to measure biodiversity

    * 3:55 - What is biodiversity for indigenous people?

    * 5:30 - Problematic history of biodiversity science

    * 7:30 - Indigenous history can contribute to science

    * 8:09 - Indigenous wisdom can help with decisionmaking

















    Podcast Guest

    Tero Mustonen







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    Alexander, C. et al. Linking Indigenous and Scientific Knowledge of Climate Change. BioScience 61, 477–484 (2011).



    Johnson, N. et al. The Contributions of Community-Based Monitoring a...

    • 11 min
    Rerun: An Ancient Pandemic Story -- an Ayurveda Text Warns of Environmental Degradation

    Rerun: An Ancient Pandemic Story -- an Ayurveda Text Warns of Environmental Degradation

    Season 1, Rerun

    An Ancient Pandemic Story















    A Sanskrit scholar narrates a pandemic story from a far-seeing Ayurveda text warning of environmental degradation

    Atreya, the renowned teacher of Ayurveda, is walking with his pupils on the banks of the river Ganga in Kampilya. Ominous signs of an epidemic shadow the grandeur of the ancient kingdom. Atreya explains to his students how an epidemic arises from degraded environmental conditions. And he points to their cause: the unrighteous actions of a particular group of citizens.

    Sanskrit scholar Dominik Wujastyk of the University of Alberta in Canada, narrates this compelling pandemic story from one of the oldest Ayurvedic texts. It’s a story of surprising resonance with our current global situation.



    Time Markers (mins:sec)



    * 0:34 Two major encyclopedias of Ayurveda 1:23 Learning Sanskrit from eminent pandit in Pune 2:30 Reciting first part of story in Sanskrit 3:41 How Ayurveda views the human body 4:30 The Charaka samhita 4:55 Atreya’s story 6:58 How Ayurveda explains an epidemic 7:20 Descriptions of corrupted environmental conditions 8:26 Atreya’s story continues 8:50 What causes environmental corruption 9:44 Greed and the environment 10:24 Ancient texts are based on observation 10:53 A golden opportunity

















    Guests

    Dominik Wujastyk







    Resources

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    Wujastyk, Dominik. The Roots of Āyurveda: Selections from Sanskrit Medical Writings, Penguin Classics (London, New York: Penguin Group). Third revised edition,pp.xlviii, 361. 2003

    Wujastyk, Dominik and Conrad, Lawrence I. Contagion: Perspectives from Pre-modern Societies. (Ashgate Publishing: Aldershot, Burlington USA, Singapore, Sydney). 2000

    Wujastyk, Dominik (2017). ‘Models of Disease in Ayurvedic Medicine’. In: The Routledge History of Disease. Ed. by Mark Jackson. Abingdon: Routledge. Chap. 3, pp. 38–53.

    • 12 min
    Bonus Episode: The Shameful Legacy of Indigenous Residential Schools

    Bonus Episode: The Shameful Legacy of Indigenous Residential Schools

    Season 1, Bonus Episode

    The Shameful Legacy of Indigenous Residential Schools















    Indigenous residential schools have a shameful legacy across the world and through several centuries, right up to the present day. They erased native cultures and religions, and aimed to ‘civilize’ indigenous people. And children attending these schools have also endured horrific conditions and abuse.

    We look first at the history of indigenous residential schools in the United States. Over 150 years, hundreds of thousands of Native American children resided at these schools and were subject to physical, mental, and sexual abuse.

    In Peru, children of the Arakambut were sent to Catholic mission schools and taught Spanish.

    In Australia, children as young as 4 years old were placed in dorms, taught menial labor and domestic tasks, and sent to work at 14.

    Children of India’s 104 million Adivasis also attended indigenous residential schools. They began during British rule, and continued after Independence, as ashram schools. A 2012 investigation called these ashram schools poorly run and managed, and reports of starvation, ill treatment and inadequate teaching have been widespread.

    Time Markers (mins: sec)



    * 0:12 Sally General’s experience at Mush Hole

    2:22 defining ‘indigenous’

    3:47 collaboration with How Did We Not Know That? Podcast

    3:55 promo for How Did We Not Know That?

    4:48 recording from our closets; please donate!

    5:31 Native American boarding schools in the US

    6:43 mission of US boarding schools

    7:06 ‘Kill the Indian, Save the Man’

    8:00 early history of Native American education

    9:38 ‘Indian Residential Schools’ in the 19th-20th centuries

    10:05 erasing Native American identities

    11:30 horrific conditions at the schools

    12:27 the first US boarding school: Carlisle

    13:02 how the US government forced children into schools

    13:45 what happened to children after leaving schools

    14:20 laws allow Native Americans to determine education

    15:10 reckoning or resolution 

    15:36 Department of Interior investigation

    15:50 Lakota children’s remains returned to reservation

    16:48 residential schools in South America

    19:40 Australia boarding schools for indigenous

    20:20 studies on children attending boarding schools

    21:10 boarding schools for Adivasi in India

    21:54 British schools for tribal children in Andaman Islands

    23:12 Ashram schools for tribal children

    23:50 AV Thakkar’s views on tribal education

    25:28 conditions in the Ashram schools

    26:58 news clip on sexual abuse in tribal schools

    28:28 residential schools and resource extraction

    29:20 ‘banking model’ of education

    30:44 education and a consumer society

    31:55 funding from World Bank and UN

    33:20 common threads across regions and history

    33:53 legacy of colonialism on India tribal schools



















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    How Did We Not Know That







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    • 35 min
    Rerun: Crooked Cats - Why is there Human Animal Conflict?

    Rerun: Crooked Cats - Why is there Human Animal Conflict?

    Season 1, rerun

    Crooked Big Cats: Why do we have human animal conflict?















    There are so many stories of human animal conflict in India, where carnivores live in close proximity with people. On July 29, International Tiger Day, we attempt to answer this and other questions by talking to Nayanika Mathur, an anthropologist at Oxford University.

    Nayanika has spent a decade in the trenches in the Himalayas interviewing people who've encountered leopards and other Big Cats. She follows in the footsteps of hunter-naturalist Jim Corbett, who wrote the Maneater of Kumaon in 1944 and chronicled attacks by Bengal tigers and leopards.

    Nayanika discusses why some animals attack humans. Do animals have agency? What does the latest in animal behavior research tell us about these animals, and what does indigineous wisdom have to offer?

    Time Markers (mins: sec)



    00:04 -- Leopard attack

    02:00 -- Human-animal conflict has become the norm

    3:45 -- Introducing Nayanika Mathur

    4:08 -- Nayanika collects big cat stories

    4:57 -- stories from unknown voices are powerful

    5:54 - Story of a leopard watching a woman named Vimla

    7:50 -- Why didn’t the leopard hurt Vimla?

    8:15 -- animals have memory

    9:29 -- science shows animals have memory

    11:45 -- story of the man with one arm

    13:40 -- how can we live more in balance with nature?

















    Guests

    Nayanika Mathur







    Resources

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    Paper Tiger: Law, Bureaucracy and the Developmental State in Himalayan India. Mathur, Nayanika. Delhi: Cambridge University Press, 2016. 204 pp.

    Telling the story of the pandemic. (2020, May 11). Somatosphere. http://somatosphere.net/forumpost/covid19-storytelling-pandemic/

    • 15 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
12 Ratings

12 Ratings

Ianoopt ,

Wonderful!!

So glad that I found this show. So much to learn and what an enriching experience. Special shout out for audio production. This is as good as it can get.

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