10 episodes

Scurvy Companions is the NoSweatShakespeare Podcast, hosted by Emily Jackoway.

Scurvy Companions will take a deep dive into Shakespeare from the perspective of diverse experts in fields of Shakespearean performance, literary study, education, social media, and more — all while keeping the Bard’s works entertaining and accessible.

Follow us on social media for updates and visit us at our main hub, NoSweatShakespeare.com.

Scurvy Companions NoSweatShakespeare

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

Scurvy Companions is the NoSweatShakespeare Podcast, hosted by Emily Jackoway.

Scurvy Companions will take a deep dive into Shakespeare from the perspective of diverse experts in fields of Shakespearean performance, literary study, education, social media, and more — all while keeping the Bard’s works entertaining and accessible.

Follow us on social media for updates and visit us at our main hub, NoSweatShakespeare.com.

    "Something wicked": Macbeth, King James, and Witchcraft with Korey Leigh Smith and Elyse Sharp

    "Something wicked": Macbeth, King James, and Witchcraft with Korey Leigh Smith and Elyse Sharp

    When actors Korey Leigh Smith and Elyse Sharp started their own Shakespeare podcast, “Shakespeare Anyone?”, they wanted to do deep dives into the history, themes, and scholarly analysis of all the plays — without, as Korey says, going into the crippling debt of grad school. And they did just that — their series on Macbeth alone has ten episodes, with a total of seven hours of Macbeth content. They’re now moving onto Twelfth Night and, from the looks of things, they’ll be devoting the same amount of time there. 

    Today, Korey and Elyse join us to discuss one of the major aspects of Macbeth they discuss – the history behind King James’s obsession with witchcraft and how it feeds into the play. We’ll be discussing Shakespeare’s historical sources for the play, what the political climate was like in England at the time, how England’s king became so obsessed with witches and the supernatural, and what Shakespeare’s goal might have been in writing a play steeped in treason and sorcery.  

    Korey and Elyse are interviewed by host Emily Jackoway. To learn more about NoSweatShakespeare, check out our site at nosweatshakespeare.com and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. If you enjoyed this podcast, be sure to follow or subscribe and give us a five-star rating. Thanks for listening in!

    • 40 min
    "What's past is prologue": Shakespeare's Lost Years with Ralph Goldswain

    "What's past is prologue": Shakespeare's Lost Years with Ralph Goldswain

    Imagine if, for a total of 11 years of your life, you completely disappeared from record. No leases on any apartments, no phone records, no credit card transactions. Just totally as if you didn't exist. It seems impossible to imagine now, but hundreds of years ago, records were pretty thin -- even if you were a famous poet, playwright, and actor like one William Shakespeare, who totally disappears from public record from the years of 1578-1582 and 1585-1592. Theories abound about what Shakespeare was up to during that time. Was he on the run from the law? Secretly visiting the Vatican? Or perhaps traveling with a band of actors? The only thing we know for sure is that he suddenly emerges around 1585 as one of the most famous playwrights in London -- but we have no idea how he got there.

    Here to speculate on what happened is NoSweatShakespeare's founder and resident scholar, Ralph Goldswain. Ralph joined us a couple months ago to talk about Shakespeare's life in Stratford, but he has plenty of knowledge about Shakespeare's life in London and beyond, as well -- even when the facts are a little scarce. An English teacher for four decades, a member of the National Shakespeare and Schools Project, and a frequent lecturer on Shakespeare's life and works, Ralph has a pretty solid idea of what may have happened during Shakespeare's famed "Lost Years."

    Ralph is interviewed by host Emily Jackoway. To learn more about NoSweatShakespeare, check out our site at nosweatshakespeare.com and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. If you enjoyed this podcast, be sure to follow or subscribe and give us a five-star rating. Thanks for listening in!

    • 40 min
    "These violent delights": Stage fight choreographer David Brimmer

    "These violent delights": Stage fight choreographer David Brimmer

    Shakespeare wrote some of the most beautiful poetry and sweetest love scenes in history. But, as we all know, he also thought up some of the grisliest fight scenes and murders. How do you stage Macbeth and Macduff's duel, or Lavinia's maiming, or Mercutio's death? Fight choreographer and master David Brimmer is here to shed some light on what those fights do for the story, and how actors get them onstage.

    David has been working in fight choreography for 40 years, and has staged fights for both Shakespearean and contemporary work for Broadway, film sets, and regional theaters across the United States. He is a renowned Fight Master with the Society of American Fight Directors, and founded the stage combat program at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts. He has choreographed for scads of famous directors, actors, and playwrights; one of his recent credits was choreographing for Spring Awakening on Broadway.

    Today David will talk with us about how he got started in stage combat, how the certification process for stage combat works, how to stage the reality of pain in stage fights, and why combat is meaningful in Shakespeare's works.

    David is interviewed by host Emily Jackoway. To learn more about NoSweatShakespeare, check out our site at nosweatshakespeare.com and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. If you enjoyed this podcast, be sure to follow or subscribe and give us a five-star rating. Thanks for listening in!

    • 36 min
    "Speak the speech as I pronounced it to you": Director of New York University's Classical Studio, Daniel Spector

    "Speak the speech as I pronounced it to you": Director of New York University's Classical Studio, Daniel Spector

    New York University's Tisch School of the Arts houses multiple drama studios, each of which teach their own technique for acting. One of them, the Classical Studio, was developed more than 20 years ago to use Shakespeare as the basis for acting education. The studio is a training ground for both classical and contemporary work, and has produced alums who have used their Shakespeare training to work in both classical productions, in musicals on Broadway, and more.

    We are joined today by the studio's director, Daniel Spector, who was once a student in the program himself. He is a member of the Lincoln Center Theater Directors Lab and an alumnus of the Broadway Theatre Project. He has served as a consultant to PBS on matters Shakespearean, moderated Artist Talks at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, led workshops for numerous arts organizations, produced many readings of new plays, and spoken at conferences around the world (British Shakespeare Association, Offensive Shakespeare, BritGrad, Shakespeare Theatre Conference). Today he will talk with us about how Shakespeare's verse can be used to train actors, what kind of classes are taught in a small Shakespeare conservatory ensemble, how Shakespeare acting education transferred online during the pandemic, and more.

    Daniel is interviewed by host Emily Jackoway. To learn more about NoSweatShakespeare, check out our site at nosweatshakespeare.com and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. If you enjoyed this podcast, be sure to follow or subscribe and give us a five-star rating. Thanks for listening in!

    • 36 min
    "All the world's a stage": Zoom Shakespeare with The Show Must Go Online

    "All the world's a stage": Zoom Shakespeare with The Show Must Go Online

    Back in March of 2020, theaters shut down across the world due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Rather than closing up shop, actor Rob Myles formed a Shakespeare reading group over Zoom — a group which quickly transformed into an online theater company, The Show Must Go Online. Since then, TSMGO has performed the entire Shakespeare canon, premiering a new production every week throughout the pandemic. They’ve involved actors and theater makers from across the world, and every performance included guest speakers, with luminaries like Ben Crystal and Simon Russell Beale joining in on the fun. All of the performances are still up on YouTube, and have garnered tens of thousands of views across the globe.

    Rob Myles joins us from his home in Glasgow. He is an actor, author, director, stage fighter, and creator of the Shakespeare Deck, which aims to make Shakespeare simple on the go. Today he’ll be joining us to talk about how The Show Must Go Online developed, the process and challenges of creating Zoom theater so quickly and at such a high level, and his views on how we can make Shakespeare and theater in general more inclusive and accessible going forward.

    Rob is interviewed by host Emily Jackoway. To learn more about NoSweatShakespeare, check out our site at nosweatshakespeare.com and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. If you enjoyed this podcast, be sure to follow or subscribe and give us a five-star rating. Thanks for listening in!

    • 40 min
    "The play's the thing": Actor and Director Jacqueline Thompson

    "The play's the thing": Actor and Director Jacqueline Thompson

    The COVID-19 pandemic has brought on change for everyone in the world, but for actors in particular. Jacqueline Thompson, an actor, director, producer, and professor based in St. Louis, Missouri, is one of the first actors taking to the stage as we enter our (hopefully) post-pandemic theatrical space. She will be playing Regan in St. Louis Shakespeare Festival's production of King Lear, premiering this June, starring André De Shields in the title role. 

    Jacqueline has a rich history of community-engaged classical theater stemming from her involvement with St. Louis Shakespeare Festival's Shakespeare in the Streets program and furthered by the Regional Arts Commission's Community Arts Training Program. Her work has earned her accolades like a Visionary Award, which recognizes St. Louis women in the arts, the award for Outstanding Actress in a Drama from the St. Louis Theater Circle, and participation in the Theater Communications Group's Rising Leaders of Color program. 

    Today, Jacqueline will be talking to us about how to effectively engage with communities through theater, how the pandemic has shaped recent performance, and how to make classical theater accessible to everyone. 

    You can learn more about seeing Jacqueline in King Lear in St. Louis this summer here. Jacqueline is interviewed by host Emily Jackoway. To learn more about NoSweatShakespeare, check out our site at nosweatshakespeare.com and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. If you enjoyed this podcast, be sure to follow or subscribe and give us a five-star rating. Thanks for listening in!



     

    • 26 min

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