23 episodes

What is population health? Why do some people become sick, while others don’t? Why should we care about inequities in health? How do we study and what can we do to eliminate health inequities? Sick Individuals/ Sick Populations, the new podcast series from the Interdisciplinary Association of Population Health Science, covers these topics and more. Join hosts Darrell Hudson, Aresha Martinez and Michael Esposito they interview leading researchers about cutting-edge population health science. Tune in twice a month for conversations of how experts from different methodological and disciplinary traditions work with one another, across boundaries, to understand and improve population health.

Sick Individuals / Sick Populations Suzanne Bevan

    • Science
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

What is population health? Why do some people become sick, while others don’t? Why should we care about inequities in health? How do we study and what can we do to eliminate health inequities? Sick Individuals/ Sick Populations, the new podcast series from the Interdisciplinary Association of Population Health Science, covers these topics and more. Join hosts Darrell Hudson, Aresha Martinez and Michael Esposito they interview leading researchers about cutting-edge population health science. Tune in twice a month for conversations of how experts from different methodological and disciplinary traditions work with one another, across boundaries, to understand and improve population health.

    2.2. Shining a Light on the Recent Crises in Haiti

    2.2. Shining a Light on the Recent Crises in Haiti

    In the midst that is happening all around us in the United States right now, it is easy to lose sight of what is happening across the globe. Haiti is a country rich in history and culture that has experienced a great deal of misfortune, historically and contemporarily. Just in the last six weeks, there has been a presidential assassination, an earthquake and torrential storms all while rates of Covid-19 have surged. In this episode, we were joined by Dr. Lora Iannotti, a global health researcher who has been working in Haiti for several decades. We discussed the historical context of Haiti, the unique challenges the country has faced and what solutions are needed to lead to sustainable progress in Haiti.

    • 36 min
    2.1. The pandemic and workplace inequity

    2.1. The pandemic and workplace inequity

    Welcome back for another episode of Sick Individuals/ Sick Populations. In this episode, we were fortunate to be joined by Dr. Adia Harvey Wingfield, the Mary Tileston Hemenway Professor of Arts & Sciences and Vice Dean for Faculty Development and Diversity in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis. Her research examines how and why racial and gender inequality persists in professional occupations. Her most recent book, Flatlining: Race, Work, and Health Care in the New Economy, won the 2019 C. Wright Mills Award. In our wide ranging conversation, we discussed the impact of the pandemic on health workers, particularly Black American providers who were already marginalized and bearing a disproportionate burden prior to the pandemic. Dr. Harvey Wingfield also shed light on what companies and organizations should be doing to support equity beyond hashtags and statements.



    Link to the book: https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520300347/flatlining

    • 39 min
    1.21. Season 1 Recap

    1.21. Season 1 Recap

    On this episode of Sick Individuals/Sick Populations, we wrap up the inaugural season of our podcast. Join our hosts as they recap their favorite moments from the first season, reflect on what they've learned in conversation with our podcast guests, and preview what we have in store for Season 2.

    • 31 min
    1.20. SES Policies and Health

    1.20. SES Policies and Health

    One of the key determinants of health considered to drive health inequities is socioeconomic status. Many scholars, practitioners and policy makers believe that increases in socioeconomic status will eliminate health gaps, especially racial/ethnic inequities. However, the story is a lot more complicated than that. In this episode, we unpack some important nuances about the relationship between socioeconomic status and health with two leading population health researchers, Cindy Colen and Katrina Walsemann.

    • 45 min
    1.19. Behind the Scenes of Dear Pandemic

    1.19. Behind the Scenes of Dear Pandemic

    One year into the COVID-19 pandemic, we reflect on the important ways population health scientists have contributed to the pandemic response by chatting with Drs Lindsey Leininger and Amanda Simanek, two members of the Those Nerdy Girls who lead Dear Pandemic website and social media platforms. Dear Pandemic uses social media to answer people’s pandemic-related questions, aiming to cut through the swirl of disinformation on the web with clear and concise communication.  Join us as we learn how Dear Pandemic got started and emerged, how the team is communicating science in innovative ways, and the lessons the Nerdy Girls have learned about their science and professional development with this project.  Listeners can learn more about Dear Pandemic here: https://dearpandemic.org/

    • 44 min
    1.18. Legacies of Racism on Our Contemporary Political Moment

    1.18. Legacies of Racism on Our Contemporary Political Moment

    We are just in the first few months of 2021 but there is already quite a bit to digest. On the heels of a year of racial reckoning with the punctuation of the January 6 insurrection, deep societal fractures have been revealed. While surprising to many Americans, for many people, especially the outstanding scholars who contributed to this episode, these recent events are products as a continual manifestation of the legacy of racism that undergirds the United States. If racial equity in health, socioeconomics and other outcomes are a goal of population health, it is clear that we must disrupt historical legacies of racism that have continued to affect contemporary issues. We were pleased to be joined by Professors David Cunningham and Geoff Ward, both from Washington University in St. Louis. Professor David Cunningham is the Chair of Sociology at Washington University in St. Louis. His research focuses on racial contention and its legacies. Dr. Geoff Ward is Professor of African and African-American Studies and a faculty affiliate in the Department of Sociology and American Culture Studies Program at Washington University in St. Louis. His scholarship examines the racial politics of social control and the pursuit of racial justice, historically and today.



    Listeners can find Professor Cunningham’s latest book, Klansville, USA: The Rise and Fall of the Civil Rights-Era Ku Klux Klan here.



    Professors Ward and Cunningham are editing a forthcoming special issue  for The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science “Legacies of Racial Violence: Clarifying and Addressing the Presence of the Past” with an anticipated publishing in May 2021.

    • 54 min

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