49 episodes

Sidebar by Courthouse News tackles the stories you need to know from the legal world. Join reporters Hillel Aaron, Kirk McDaniel, Amanda Pampuro and Kelsey Reichmann as they take you in and out of courtrooms in the U.S. and beyond and break down all the developments that had them talking.

Sidebar by Courthouse News Courthouse News

    • News
    • 4.8 • 15 Ratings

Sidebar by Courthouse News tackles the stories you need to know from the legal world. Join reporters Hillel Aaron, Kirk McDaniel, Amanda Pampuro and Kelsey Reichmann as they take you in and out of courtrooms in the U.S. and beyond and break down all the developments that had them talking.

    Copyright Conundrum

    Copyright Conundrum

    Would you believe us if we told you copyright law is the biggest regulation on free speech in the United States? 

    When you exercise your First Amendment right to paint a picture or write the next great American novel, your speech belongs to you. No one can take it and pass it off as their own. 

    But when all the power is vested solely in one person, the rights of others slowly begin to dwindle. 

    If you think copyright is just a term for media executives and lawyers, come along as we unravel its constitutional underpinnings. 

    In our fifth episode this season, we dissect this intricate balance that copyright law maintains between protecting creators and ensuring the public’s unfettered access to cultural treasurer, detailing the symbiotic relationship between artistic works and the fundamental right to speak freely. 

    Copyright is all around us because speech is all around us. 

    Special guests:
    Jennifer Jenkins, a Duke University professor of law and director of the university's Center for the Study of the Public DomainMike Masnick, writer and founder of TechdirtCorynne McSherry, legal director at the Electronic Frontier FoundationKeith Kupferschmid, CEO of Copyright AllianceThis episode was produced by Kirk McDaniel. Intro music by The Dead Pens.

    Editorial staff is Bill Dotinga, Sean Duffy and Jamie Ross.

    • 34 min
    Bitter Pill: Pregnancy and Personhood in a Post-Dobbs America

    Bitter Pill: Pregnancy and Personhood in a Post-Dobbs America

    The landscape of abortion rights in America is unrecognizable in the wake of the Supreme Court’s decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization.
    Join us for our fourth episode this season as we navigate this tumultuous terrain, dissecting the seismic shifts and looming legal — and political — battles that promise to keep this issue at the forefront of national discourse. As states become battlegrounds with polarized stances on reproductive laws, how will the growing schism impact our collective moral compass and individual liberties?
    Hold onto your seats as we examine the Supreme Court’s potential reshaping of federal authority over FDA-approved abortion medications like mifepristone and the state-level legislation redrawing the battleground of reproductive rights by either restricting or safeguarding abortion access, spotlighting Alabama’s legal contortions over fetal personhood and its deep entanglement with in vitro fertilization treatments that could eventually redefine reproductive autonomy. 

    Special guests:
    Dale Cecka, director of the Family Violence Litigation Clinic at Albany Law SchoolChelsey Youman, national legislative advisor for Human Coalition Action Grace Howard, associate professor of justice studies at San Jose State UniversityDana Sussman, deputy executive director at Pregnancy JusticeAziza Ahmed, law professor at Boston UniversityThis episode was produced by Kirk McDaniel. Intro music by The Dead Pens.

    Editorial staff is Bill Dotinga, Sean Duffy and Jamie Ross.

    • 33 min
    Mean Tweets

    Mean Tweets

    Editor’s note: This episode is not family friendly due to some colorful language.
    A long-running feud between eviction lawyers Dennis Block and Danny Bramzon cumulated into a Twitter parody account and a libel lawsuit that made it all the way to a jury trial.
    In the third episode this season, we take the temperature of defamation law in the 21st century when it comes to X, formerly known as Twitter.
    Block isn’t the only one unsuccessful in the courtroom. A lawsuit that sought to take down Elon Musk over his infamous “pedo guy” tweet failed, as did efforts by “badass lawyer” Todd Levitt and former Congressman Devin Nunes over their Twitter impersonators.
    Why is it so hard to win a defamation lawsuit when digital satire is at play? The courtroom becomes a crucible, with jurors and judges wrestling over the true nature of parody, leaving us pondering the potential repercussions of a legal system scrambling to catch up with the online world’s rapid evolution.
    Special guests:
    Eric Anderson, an attorney for Bramzon’s firm, BastaChristopher Frost, an attorney for BlockEugene Volokh, UCLA law professor and blogger at The Volokh Conspiracy Gordon Bloem, an attorney sued by LevittPaul Alan Levy, an attorney at Public Citizen Ryan Mac, tech reporter at The New York Times This episode was produced by Kirk McDaniel. Intro music by The Dead Pens.

    Editorial staff is Bill Dotinga, Sean Duffy and Jamie Ross.

    • 32 min
    Breaking News: SCOTUS Ends Trump Ballot Challenges

    Breaking News: SCOTUS Ends Trump Ballot Challenges

    Surprise, listeners! We’re coming to you, almost live, with a special breaking news mini episode on the Supreme Court’s unanimous decision to keep former President Donald Trump on Colorado’s ballot.
    Our very own Amanda Pampuro and Kelsey Reichmann meticulously dissect the twists and turns of the legal journey that led to this point, from the initial lawsuit by concerned Colorado voters to the constitutional debates the ensued before SCOTUS.
    How great is the magnitude of this ruling, not just for Trump’s potential return to the highest office in the land, but for its groundbreaking implications on the constitutional standards that determine who can lead the nation?
    Special guest: 
    ·         Mark Graber, law professor at the University of Maryland
    This episode was produced by Kirk McDaniel. Intro music by The Dead Pens.

    Editorial staff is Bill Dotinga, Sean Duffy and Jamie Ross.

    • 17 min
    Love Is a Lie

    Love Is a Lie

    Look around, dear listener. 
    Everything is heart-shaped and pink. People are getting ready for a special night with their special someone. 
    In our second episode this season, we take you through the dark alleyways of online dating, where $1.3 billion vanished into the pockets of scammers in just one year, and peel back the layers of marketing sleights of hand that extend far beyond the realm of matchmaking. 
    From mimosas without champagne to candy heart boxes with more filler than chocolate, we dissect the conflict between what's advertised and what lands in consumers' hands — a legal battlefield constantly redefining the line between enticing and misleading. 
    Special guests:
    “Al,” pro se plaintiff who sued Bumble  Kevin Lewis, sociology professor at UC San DiegoAttorney Spencer SheehanAttorney Robert FreundJennifer Pomeranz, public health attorney and NYU professorBonnie Patten, executive director of Truth in AdvertisingThis episode was produced by Kirk McDaniel. Intro music by The Dead Pens.

    Editorial staff is Bill Dotinga, Sean Duffy and Jamie Ross.

    • 36 min
    The Case of the Internet Sleuth

    The Case of the Internet Sleuth

    Welcome to season four of Sidebar! We're kicking off our first episode of 2024 by traversing the digital terrain of internet sleuths, those armchair detectives whose keyboards are the new magnifying glasses.

    Everyone has a hobby. Something to keep them busy, pass the time or unwind after work. Maybe listening to your favorite podcast is that thing. One such hobby that has grown with the help of the internet and social media is internet sleuthing. On websites like TikTok, Reddit and Websleuths, people post the latest theories about mysteries big and small.
    Since the high-profile murder of Gabby Petito, it feels like hobby investigators have gained more prominence, from the initial mystery of the University of Idaho student murders to the Rainey Street Ripper, the Austin, Texas, serial killer that wasn't.
    What's behind the psychological forces that drive this online phenomenon?

    Special guests:
    David Schmid, professor of English at the University of BuffaloRachel Monroe, author of “Savage Appetites: Four True Stories of Women, Crime, and Obsession”Chance Townsend, assistant editor at MashableThis episode was produced by Kirk McDaniel. Intro music by The Dead Pens.

    Editorial staff is Bill Dotinga, Sean Duffy and Jamie Ross.

    • 35 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
15 Ratings

15 Ratings

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