5 episodes

The COVID pandemic exposed the extent to which sleep is entwined with social conditions - sleep is highly dynamic and very little about sleep is unchangeable. For example, changed social conditions over the past 100 years appear to have had a marked impact upon key elements of sleep. Studies on circadian rhythms and sleep, along with historical insights, have shown that such changed societal conditions have resulted in a detachment of these key biological rhythms from the geophysical cycle of light and dark, with major deleterious effects upon human functioning, wellbeing, and creativity.
Rhythmicity is not only at the heart of sleep and chronobiology, but is also fundamental to the humanities.
The network is led by Dr Sebastian Klinger (Modern Languages), Professor Sally Shuttleworth (English), Professor Russell Foster (Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute) and Dr Alessandra Aloisi (Medieval and Modern Languages).

Sleep and the Rhythms of Life Oxford University

    • Education

The COVID pandemic exposed the extent to which sleep is entwined with social conditions - sleep is highly dynamic and very little about sleep is unchangeable. For example, changed social conditions over the past 100 years appear to have had a marked impact upon key elements of sleep. Studies on circadian rhythms and sleep, along with historical insights, have shown that such changed societal conditions have resulted in a detachment of these key biological rhythms from the geophysical cycle of light and dark, with major deleterious effects upon human functioning, wellbeing, and creativity.
Rhythmicity is not only at the heart of sleep and chronobiology, but is also fundamental to the humanities.
The network is led by Dr Sebastian Klinger (Modern Languages), Professor Sally Shuttleworth (English), Professor Russell Foster (Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute) and Dr Alessandra Aloisi (Medieval and Modern Languages).

    Dance Music, Wakefulness and Embodied Rhythm – Part 4

    Dance Music, Wakefulness and Embodied Rhythm – Part 4

    How could different types of music be used in therapy? Oxford medical graduate and working musician and DJ Michael Diamond discusses the features of different music genres types of music and their therapeutic potential. The project 'Dance Music, Wakefulness and Embodied Rhythm' is part of the 'Sleep and the Rhythms of Life' Network, a sequence of events organised by The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH).

    These four talks are taken from the 'Dance Music, Wakefulness and Embodied Rhythm' seminar:
    The relationship between music and sleep is well represented by the long history of lullabies. The complementary relationship between music and wakefulness is perhaps less obvious but no less significant, and in some of its manifestations is closely associated with the other focus of this network: rhythm. This seminar will consider the relationship between electronic dance music and wakefulness, including the prolonged wakefulness that is characteristic of extended dance parties. The seminar will feature presentations representing perspectives from the psychology of music, machine aesthetics, and DJ practice, and will draw on principles of rhythmic entrainment and DJ set design, as well as the implications for rhythmic embodiment of different forms of machine aesthetics. 

    Eric Clarke is Emeritus Professor of Music at the University of Oxford, and an Emeritus  Fellow of Wadham College. He has published on various topics in the psychology of music, musical creativity, and the analysis of pop music. Recent projects include work on music, empathy and cultural understanding; and timing in the performance of C19th orchestral and chamber music. His books include Ways of Listening (OUP 2005), Music and Mind in Everyday Life (OUP 2010), Distributed Creativity: Collaboration and Improvisation in Contemporary Music (OUP 2017), Music and Consciousness 1 & 2 (OUP 2011, 2019), and Remixing Music Studies (Routledge 2021). He is a member of Academia Europaea, and a Fellow of the British Academy.

    Michael Diamond is a producer, DJ and musician based in Oxford, where he has recently completed a medical degree at Brasenose college. He regularly performs as a DJ in the UK and beyond. His latest record was the widely acclaimed jazz-influenced electronic album 'Third Culture'. He is currently resident DJ at one of the UK's longest-running electronic music clubnights 'Simple'. His academic interests lie in the intersection between music, neuropsychology and medicine including the musical and psychological mechanisms underpinning feelings of energy on the dancefloor and their potential healthcare applications.

    Chair: Professor Sally Shuttleworth, Professor of English Literature at University of Oxford. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 5 min
    Dance Music, Wakefulness and Embodied Rhythm – Part 3

    Dance Music, Wakefulness and Embodied Rhythm – Part 3

    How can electronic dance music tools and techniques be used to manipulate music for psychological ends, for example to enhance sleep? The project 'Dance Music, Wakefulness and Embodied Rhythm' is part of the 'Sleep and the Rhythms of Life' Network, a sequence of events organised by The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH).

    These four talks are taken from the 'Dance Music, Wakefulness and Embodied Rhythm' seminar:
    The relationship between music and sleep is well represented by the long history of lullabies. The complementary relationship between music and wakefulness is perhaps less obvious but no less significant, and in some of its manifestations is closely associated with the other focus of this network: rhythm. This seminar will consider the relationship between electronic dance music and wakefulness, including the prolonged wakefulness that is characteristic of extended dance parties. The seminar will feature presentations representing perspectives from the psychology of music, machine aesthetics, and DJ practice, and will draw on principles of rhythmic entrainment and DJ set design, as well as the implications for rhythmic embodiment of different forms of machine aesthetics. 

    Eric Clarke is Emeritus Professor of Music at the University of Oxford, and an Emeritus  Fellow of Wadham College. He has published on various topics in the psychology of music, musical creativity, and the analysis of pop music. Recent projects include work on music, empathy and cultural understanding; and timing in the performance of C19th orchestral and chamber music. His books include Ways of Listening (OUP 2005), Music and Mind in Everyday Life (OUP 2010), Distributed Creativity: Collaboration and Improvisation in Contemporary Music (OUP 2017), Music and Consciousness 1 & 2 (OUP 2011, 2019), and Remixing Music Studies (Routledge 2021). He is a member of Academia Europaea, and a Fellow of the British Academy.

    Michael Diamond is a producer, DJ and musician based in Oxford, where he has recently completed a medical degree at Brasenose college. He regularly performs as a DJ in the UK and beyond. His latest record was the widely acclaimed jazz-influenced electronic album 'Third Culture'. He is currently resident DJ at one of the UK's longest-running electronic music clubnights 'Simple'. His academic interests lie in the intersection between music, neuropsychology and medicine including the musical and psychological mechanisms underpinning feelings of energy on the dancefloor and their potential healthcare applications.

    Chair: Professor Sally Shuttleworth, Professor of English Literature at University of Oxford. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 5 min
    Dance Music, Wakefulness and Embodied Rhythm – Part 2

    Dance Music, Wakefulness and Embodied Rhythm – Part 2

    How does a DJ use different music to engage listeners, from a neuropsychological perspective? Professor Eric Clarke (Emeritus Professor of Music at Oxford) and Michael Diamond (Oxford medical graduate and musician/DJ) discuss. The project 'Dance Music, Wakefulness and Embodied Rhythm' is part of the 'Sleep and the Rhythms of Life' Network, a sequence of events organised by The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH).

    These four talks are taken from the 'Dance Music, Wakefulness and Embodied Rhythm' seminar:
    The relationship between music and sleep is well represented by the long history of lullabies. The complementary relationship between music and wakefulness is perhaps less obvious but no less significant, and in some of its manifestations is closely associated with the other focus of this network: rhythm. This seminar will consider the relationship between electronic dance music and wakefulness, including the prolonged wakefulness that is characteristic of extended dance parties. The seminar will feature presentations representing perspectives from the psychology of music, machine aesthetics, and DJ practice, and will draw on principles of rhythmic entrainment and DJ set design, as well as the implications for rhythmic embodiment of different forms of machine aesthetics. 

    Eric Clarke is Emeritus Professor of Music at the University of Oxford, and an Emeritus  Fellow of Wadham College. He has published on various topics in the psychology of music, musical creativity, and the analysis of pop music. Recent projects include work on music, empathy and cultural understanding; and timing in the performance of C19th orchestral and chamber music. His books include Ways of Listening (OUP 2005), Music and Mind in Everyday Life (OUP 2010), Distributed Creativity: Collaboration and Improvisation in Contemporary Music (OUP 2017), Music and Consciousness 1 & 2 (OUP 2011, 2019), and Remixing Music Studies (Routledge 2021). He is a member of Academia Europaea, and a Fellow of the British Academy.

    Michael Diamond is a producer, DJ and musician based in Oxford, where he has recently completed a medical degree at Brasenose college. He regularly performs as a DJ in the UK and beyond. His latest record was the widely acclaimed jazz-influenced electronic album 'Third Culture'. He is currently resident DJ at one of the UK's longest-running electronic music clubnights 'Simple'. His academic interests lie in the intersection between music, neuropsychology and medicine including the musical and psychological mechanisms underpinning feelings of energy on the dancefloor and their potential healthcare applications.

    Chair: Professor Sally Shuttleworth, Professor of English Literature at University of Oxford.
    Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 3 min
    Dance Music, Wakefulness and Embodied Rhythm – Part 1

    Dance Music, Wakefulness and Embodied Rhythm – Part 1

    What's the relationship between music and the rhythms of our lives? Professor Sally Shuttleworth asks Professor Eric Clarke (Music at University of Oxford) and Michael Diamond (Oxford medical graduate and musician/DJ) to discuss. The project 'Dance Music, Wakefulness and Embodied Rhythm' is part of the 'Sleep and the Rhythms of Life' Network, a sequence of events organised by The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH).

    These four talks are taken from the 'Dance Music, Wakefulness and Embodied Rhythm' seminar:
    The relationship between music and sleep is well represented by the long history of lullabies. The complementary relationship between music and wakefulness is perhaps less obvious but no less significant, and in some of its manifestations is closely associated with the other focus of this network: rhythm. This seminar will consider the relationship between electronic dance music and wakefulness, including the prolonged wakefulness that is characteristic of extended dance parties. The seminar will feature presentations representing perspectives from the psychology of music, machine aesthetics, and DJ practice, and will draw on principles of rhythmic entrainment and DJ set design, as well as the implications for rhythmic embodiment of different forms of machine aesthetics. 

    Eric Clarke is Emeritus Professor of Music at the University of Oxford, and an Emeritus  Fellow of Wadham College. He has published on various topics in the psychology of music, musical creativity, and the analysis of pop music. Recent projects include work on music, empathy and cultural understanding; and timing in the performance of C19th orchestral and chamber music. His books include Ways of Listening (OUP 2005), Music and Mind in Everyday Life (OUP 2010), Distributed Creativity: Collaboration and Improvisation in Contemporary Music (OUP 2017), Music and Consciousness 1 & 2 (OUP 2011, 2019), and Remixing Music Studies (Routledge 2021). He is a member of Academia Europaea, and a Fellow of the British Academy.

    Michael Diamond is a producer, DJ and musician based in Oxford, where he has recently completed a medical degree at Brasenose college. He regularly performs as a DJ in the UK and beyond. His latest record was the widely acclaimed jazz-influenced electronic album 'Third Culture'. He is currently resident DJ at one of the UK's longest-running electronic music clubnights 'Simple'. His academic interests lie in the intersection between music, neuropsychology and medicine including the musical and psychological mechanisms underpinning feelings of energy on the dancefloor and their potential healthcare applications.

    Chair: Professor Sally Shuttleworth, Professor of English Literature at University of Oxford.

    Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 11 min
    Sleep, Light, Architecture

    Sleep, Light, Architecture

    How can a neuroscientist and an architect help us to understand the world of sleep and the rhythms that govern our lives? A conversation between Professor Russell Foster, author of Lifetime (Penguin, 2022), and Head of the Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute at the University of Oxford, and world-renowned architect Ian Ritchie.

    • 12 min

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