44 episodes

Our lives are frequently and significantly affected by food. Because we must eat to survive, many human cultures have developed with food at their very core. Through prosperous times and depression what we eat has influenced art, music, science, relationships, and more. In this fast-paced world, we often don’t take the time to consider how food gets to our plates, the importance of what and how that food is produced and the aesthetics of food requirements and food enjoyment. Often, seemingly obscure or unrelated aspects of life circle their way back to food. The goal of this podcast is to explore the complexity and nuance of the global food system, celebrate the progress we have made, and debate the best ways for humans to proceed forward into the future. Join Scott and Jay as they informally discuss these points with various contributors from Kansas State University and abroad.


To reach the Global Food Systems staff, email research@k-state.edu

Something to Chew On - Global Food Systems at Kansas State University Kansas State University

    • Science
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

Our lives are frequently and significantly affected by food. Because we must eat to survive, many human cultures have developed with food at their very core. Through prosperous times and depression what we eat has influenced art, music, science, relationships, and more. In this fast-paced world, we often don’t take the time to consider how food gets to our plates, the importance of what and how that food is produced and the aesthetics of food requirements and food enjoyment. Often, seemingly obscure or unrelated aspects of life circle their way back to food. The goal of this podcast is to explore the complexity and nuance of the global food system, celebrate the progress we have made, and debate the best ways for humans to proceed forward into the future. Join Scott and Jay as they informally discuss these points with various contributors from Kansas State University and abroad.


To reach the Global Food Systems staff, email research@k-state.edu

    Destructive greenhouse gases in the food system

    Destructive greenhouse gases in the food system

    In this podcast, Jeongdae Im, Jeffrey and Joy Lessman keystone research scholar and assistant professor in the Department of Civil Engineering discusses destructive greenhouse gases in the food system. From hay bales to landfills, plastics to wastewater, the intersection of engineering and microbiological science has allowed Im to tackle multiple challenges in studying ways to mitigate the negative effects of those greenhouse gases.

    • 42 min
    Anaerobic microorganisms importance within agricultural systems

    Anaerobic microorganisms importance within agricultural systems

    In this podcast, we talk with Prathap Parameswaran, associate professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at K-State. Parameswaran’s research focuses on the use of anaerobic microorganisms in a continuous system that produces energy and isolates materials that might be used to increase soil nutrients and more. Parameswaran discusses his approach to combating water contamination and its importance within agricultural systems.

    • 51 min
    The Microbiome: A discussion of life as we know it

    The Microbiome: A discussion of life as we know it

    In this podcast, we talk with Sonny Lee, assistant professor in the Division of Biology at K-State. Lee’s work touches on many areas of microbiome research and casts a wide net in laboratory studies, mining data from peers to aid in complex evaluations, and working with students and colleagues capable of critical thinking and problem solving. Lee discusses how we are in the infancy of understanding how organisms impact our health, a plant's ability to grow and everything dealing with life as we know it.

    • 46 min
    Diversity is the key to Sustainability: Challenges and opportunities in the field of Weed Science

    Diversity is the key to Sustainability: Challenges and opportunities in the field of Weed Science

    Listen to our first podcast of 2022, where we discuss weed management techniques, old and new, and the tools being developed to achieve food crop yield optimization with Vipan Kumar, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the Department of Agronomy at Kansas State University. Weeds can reduce food crop yields by more than 30%.  In this podcast, Kumar discusses the ways in which this problem might be solved when the need for food production will continue to increase, and the challenges caused by climate change create a moving target.
     
    Transcript:
    “Diversity is the key to Sustainability; Challenges and opportunities in the field of Weed Science”.   
     
    Diversity is the key for sustainability. You keep doing one thing again and again you will see a problem that we have seen in our herbicide based methods or weed control.
     
    Something to chew on is a podcast devoted to the exploration and discussion of global food systems. It's produced by the Office of Research Development at Kansas State University. I'm Maureen Olewnik, coordinator of Global Food Systems. We welcome back co host Dr. Jim Stack Professor of Plant Pathology, weeds can reduce food crop yields by more than 30%. These interlopers compete for resources including soil nutrients and water. We attempt to control weed growth through chemistry, but over time they manage to mutate, overcome, thrive, and adjust to given management techniques. So how is this problem solved when the need for food production will continue to increase and the challenges caused by climate change create a moving target. Today, we will hear more about weed management techniques old and new. And the tools being developed to achieve food crop yield optimization with Dr. Vipan Kumar, Assistant Professor in the Department of Agronomy at Kansas State University, I want to welcome you Vipan would like to before we get started in the technical side of things, just get a little background and understanding of who you are and how you got to the place that you are today as far as your professional interests go.
     
    Sure, So my name is Vipin Kumar, I'm originally from India. I did my bachelor in crop science, but finished in 2008 from Punjab Agricultural University back in India, in the state of Punjab, it's a Northwestern State in India, mainly known for wheat production and rice production. And it's very big in ag, Punjab state. So, my original goal was to help communities there, especially the farming communities to management practices they are doing so I did my bachelor there. And then I started my master actually mastering Weed Science in Pau 2008, fall 2008. But somehow I was also interested to come abroad and expand my education here in the States. So I was looking through some programs and during that time, I got to know there is a master positions open in Louisiana State. So I I applied there and I got invited and came over 2009 That was summer 2009 started my graduate research assistant with LSU, Louisiana State, Louisiana State University. So that program was specifically looking for someone who can help growers in terms of managing their irrigation water irrigation scheduling, developing some crop coefficients for the cotton prop in North East side of Louisiana. So I was based in actually a research center. It was in North East Louisiana, about five, four or five hours from the main campus Baton Rouge. So my whole research was on resource center and I got to know very few people there but I had a very excellent project to work with. So during that time, I was doing a master I got interested in Weed Science because wonderful. One of my committee member was a weed scientist. He was the superintendent with the research center and he was on my committee and glyphosate resistant Palmer Amaranth was kinda getting a lot of attention during that time in codon. So during that conversation and meeting with his students, I got interested in wheat science. So finishing master and then I started ap

    • 55 min
    The Many Paths of Pathogens with Dr. Philip Hardwidge, associate director of the Center on Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases

    The Many Paths of Pathogens with Dr. Philip Hardwidge, associate director of the Center on Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases

    In this episode, we host Dr. Philip Hardwidge, associate director of the Center on Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases in the Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology at Kansas State University. Dr. Hardwidge’s research focuses on understanding, treating and preventing diarrheal disease caused by bacterial pathogens. These pathogens represent important threats to food safety, biosecurity and animal health. His research team is tackling the fundamentals of biochemical interactions, leading to a better understanding of mitigation methods.  
     
    Transcript:
    The Many Paths of Pathogens with Dr. Philip Hardwidge, associate director of the Center on Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
    We have to be as scientists extremely open and and generally willing to share data be transparent about our
    raw data and like other aspects in life know when to ask for help.
    [Music]

    Something to chew on is a podcast devoted to the exploration and discussion of global food systems produced by the Office of Research Development at Kansas State University. I'm Maureen Olewnik. Coordinator of Global Food Systems.

    I'm Scott Tanona. I'm a philosopher of Science.

    We welcome back co-host Dr. Jim Stack Professor of Plant Pathology.
    Diarrheal disease caused by bacterial pathogens is a challenge in both humans and animals in many instances the introduction of pathogens in animal systems causes illness and in some cases is carried through meat processing affecting contamination of food meant for human consumption. Studies of food safety at K-State includes fundamental through applied research. The importance of research in the area of pathogenic bacteria has been addressed in several of our podcasts to date. Most focusing on the applied research in testing, monitoring, and mitigating potential contamination of food products. However, the basic molecular biology of host pathogen interaction is not well understood. In today's podcast, we will talk with Dr. Philip Hardwidge, Associate Director of the Center on Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases here at K-State. His study of host pathogen interaction has led to a better understanding of the mechanisms by which pathogens enter and colonize in a host system. With studies leading to an understanding of how this impacts autoimmune disorders, cancer, and more.

    I would like to welcome Dr. Philip Hardwidge to the podcast. Dr. Hardwidge is the Associate Director of NIH and Cobra Center on Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases. I am hopeful that he will explain to us exactly what all that means. Before we get started in talking about your current activities, Dr. Hardwidge could we maybe get a little bit of understanding of who you are, what your background is, and what brought you to K-State. What brought you to the area of study that you're in, today.

    Thanks for having me on this podcast series. I'm from the midwest, Michigan and Illinois. My father was a Pfizer scientist and we happened to be living in Central Illinois when I was a high school student, so he gave me some interest in Microbiology and Chemistry, so I ended up doing a Microbiology degree at the University of Illinois, and wanted to develop a research program kind of at the interface between Biochemistry and Microbiology, so I knew from a fairly early age where my career would hopefully head. I did a PHD at the Mayo Clinic Graduate School
    in Rochester, Minnesota. So, Mayo is a very famous hospital. They also have a very robust graduate training program. And after that, I did a postdoc at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver Canada. Primarily because one of the leading E Coli Microbiologists was running his laboratory in Vancouver and when I finished my education I took an Assistant Professor Position in South Dakota State University back in 2005. There were some unique opportunities to help develop their graduate program, and I had the opportunity to work with germ-free piglets which are

    • 49 min
    Special episode: Safe Food Today for a Healthy Tomorrow

    Special episode: Safe Food Today for a Healthy Tomorrow

    In celebration of World Food Safety Day, this week we are joined by researchers from the Food Science Institute at Kansas State University: Sara Gragg, associate professor; Randall Phebus, professor; Carla Luisa Schwan, postdoctoral fellow; and Jessie Vipham, assistant professor.
     
    World Food Safety Day aims to draw attention to foodborne risks and inspire action to prevent, detect and manage risks. This important work contributes to food security, human health, economic prosperity, agriculture, market access, tourism and sustainable development. The World Health Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations jointly facilitate the observance of World Food Safety Day, in collaboration with member states and other relevant organizations. This international day is an opportunity to strengthen efforts to ensure that the food we eat is safe, mainstream food safety in the public agenda and reduce the burden of foodborne diseases globally.
     
    Transcript:
    [Music]
     
    Something to chew on is a podcast devoted to the exploration and discussion of Global Food Systems produced by the Office of Research Development at Kansas State University. I'm Maureen Olewnik. Coordinator of Global Food Systems.
    World Food Safety Day is June 7, 2021. This is a day to reflect on the importance of safe and sustainable food, heed the work being done at K-State, and around the world on advancing an understanding of cause and control of food safety issues, and look toward better nutrition through safe food worldwide. Today we are excited to share with you a panel of food safety experts that work with interdisciplinary teams in the  Food Science Institute  here at K-State. Food safety is a major area of research in the  Food Science Institute , including animal and plant-based foods. Through outreach to colleagues here at K-State, nationally and internationally, the  Food Science Institute 's research team has tackled some of the most challenging food safety problems. From testing in our Biosecurity Research Institute, biocontainment bsl3 facilities, to helping teach consumers in developing regions of the world the basics of handling and preparing safe food. We welcome back co-host Dr. Jim Stack Professor of Plant Pathology, and welcome to our panel of experts Dr. Sara Gragg, Dr. Randall Phebus, Dr. Carla Luisa Schwan, and  Dr. Jessie Vipham. 
     
    World Food Safety Day is a great time to focus on the work being done at K-State in the area of food safety through the  Food Science Institute. We're going to take a bit of a different tact on this podcast by welcoming a panel of scientists that have made food safety their professional passion. They will share with us a vision of food safety research carried out at K-State, and explain how K-State is participating in the recognition of this notable day. I'd like to welcome back to the podcast doctors: Jessie Vipham, Dr. Randall Phebus, and Dr. Sara Gragg and first time welcome to Dr. Carla Schwan. Give us a little background on what the 2021 World Food Safety Day is, and where K-State fits into that? 
     
    Yeah, this is a really exciting endeavor that is led out of the World Health Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, and it was actually envisioned and put into play back in 2018, so we haven't, I don't think, as a university, here at K-State, participated in the past. But we saw this, the date is June the 7th, it's always every year, June the 7th, and the FAO has asked people to participate, and they've given some guidelines on things that we could do. And to highlight some of the food safety work that we're doing here at K-State, which is pretty extensive. The aim of World Food Safety Day, according to the FAO is to draw attention and inspire action to help prevent, detect, and manage foodborne risk. As we know, it's not just the health aspect of foodborne risk, but it's also how food safety contributes to food securit

    • 1 hr 1 min

Customer Reviews

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5 Ratings

5 Ratings

Annnnnna Waller ,

Interesting dialogue about food systems!

Really enjoying this podcast during my work commutes to learn and think about some of these deep issues with food systems and food security! The hosts keep the content on track and understandable. I’m able to hear directly from prominent scientists on their ideas and opinions that I normally wouldn’t get a chance to know. Love it!

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