257 episodes

The history of rocketry and space exploration.

Space Rocket History Archive Michael Annis

    • Science
    • 4.8 • 123 Ratings

The history of rocketry and space exploration.

    Space Rocket History #257 – Apollo 12 – Return, Re-entry and Splashdown

    Space Rocket History #257 – Apollo 12 – Return, Re-entry and Splashdown

    Ten days ago, their Saturn V rocket had blasted Bean and his crew mates out of earth’s gravitational pull. Now their home planet was pulling them back at more than 24,000 miles per hour, twelve times faster than a high-speed rifle bullet. “Boy,” said Bean, “we are really hauling!”
    Homepage with pictures

    • 37 min
    Space Rocket History #256 – Apollo 12 – Leaving the Moon

    Space Rocket History #256 – Apollo 12 – Leaving the Moon

    Dick Gordon opened the tunnel to Intrepid, saw his companions floating in a dirty cloud of moon dust, and slammed the hatch closed. He called out, “You guys ain’t gonna mess up my nice clean spacecraft!”
    Homepage with pictures

    • 33 min
    Space Rocket History #255 – Apollo 12 – Lunar Liftoff

    Space Rocket History #255 – Apollo 12 – Lunar Liftoff

    After a total of 31.6 hours on the moon, the Lunar Module ascent stage fired for about 7 minutes placing Intrepid into an orbit of 10 miles by 54 miles.
    Homepage with pictures

    • 36 min
    Space Rocket History #254 – Apollo 12 – Moonwalk 2 – Part 5 – Blocky Crater & Closeout

    Space Rocket History #254 – Apollo 12 – Moonwalk 2 – Part 5 – Blocky Crater & Closeout

    Conrad and Bean now walked north, up Surveyor Crater’s 14 degree slope. Fatigue set in as Pete and Al walked up the crater wall. The hand tool carrier was nearly full of rocks now and Bean felt the full weight of it.
    Homepage with pictures

    • 34 min
    Space Rocket History #253 – Apollo 12 – Moonwalk 2 – Part 4 – Surveyor Crater & Surveyor 3

    Space Rocket History #253 – Apollo 12 – Moonwalk 2 – Part 4 – Surveyor Crater & Surveyor 3

    Surveyor 3 was now to their right, 300 feet away, gleaming in the morning sunlight. Antennas and sensors still reached upward from its tubular frame, just as they had on April 20, 1967, when the spacecraft thumped onto the moon amid blasts from its braking rockets.
    Homepage with pictures.

    • 35 min
    Space Rocket History #252 – Apollo 12 – Moonwalk 2 – Part 3 – Rock ‘n’ Roll at Halo Crater

    Space Rocket History #252 – Apollo 12 – Moonwalk 2 – Part 3 – Rock ‘n’ Roll at Halo Crater

    The problem with running into the sun was it was so bright that Conrad and Bean could not see the moon’s surface features until they were right on top of them.
    Homepage with Pictures

    • 32 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
123 Ratings

123 Ratings

dickydipper ,

Excellent!!!

Incredibly researched and presented. You Sir, are a fantastic story teller and I very much enjoy each episode.
Thank you!!!!

towelsnapper74 ,

The Best Space-Race Podcast Possible!

IMike’s thoughtful and deliberate articulation of one of the most important chain of events in history is a must for anyone with interest in history, engineering, politics, and of course, space! I savor each episode. Here is what to expect: Mike masterfully weaves the tale of two superpowers trying to prove ideological superiority through technical innovations. They podcast follows the progress of East and West in a timeline form—private industry vs state sponsorship. He does not take sides and honors the visionaries and trailblazers on both sides who took risks, gave their lives, and met the challenges of their time. He provides a great mix of engineering challenges and their solutions. I’m on my 200th episode and am looking forward to the details of the Apollo 11 story! P S. The $5 per month I contribute is the best value in content I know of. Thank you for all the time you spend to research and produce what I consider to be the best podcast series of all time. I wish Mike and Mrs SRH the very best.

treyb723 ,

Very good.

I’m a fan of this podcast, but my only issue is that Mr. Annis insists on only using metric system units in his descriptions. If you grew up with NASA, everything, and I mean everything, is in Imperial units. It’s frustrating as I try to do quick math and continue to pay attention. Other than that, it’s amazing. A must listen!

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