31 min

Special Series: Racial Bias and Pulse Oximeters Part 1–A Problem Hiding in Plain Sight Public Health On Call

    • News

About this episode: Pulse oximeters—devices used to read blood oxygen levels in hospitals and at home—are far less reliable for people with darker skin tones... Falsely normal readings create the potential for clinical staff to miss life-threatening conditions.
In this three-episode special series, we explore a longstanding issue that only caught the nation’s attention in recent years. In episode 1: How COVID-19 shined a light on an issue that was known, but largely ignored.
Listen to Part 2: What Went Wrong?
Listen to Part 3: Fixing Pulse Oximeters.
View the transcript for this episode.
Host: Annalies Winny is a co-producer of the Pulse Ox series for the Public Health On Call podcast, an associate editor for Global Health NOW, and a contributor for the Hopkins Bloomberg Public Health magazine.
Show links and related content: The Problem with Pulse Oximeters: A Long History of Racial Bias
Estimating COVID-19 Hospitalizations in the U.S.—JMIR Public Health Surveillance
How a Popular Medical Device Encodes Racial Bias–Amy Moran-Thomas
People with darker skin are 32% more likely to have pulse oximeters overestimate oxygen levels, report says–CNN
Racial Bias in Pulse Oximetry Measurement—The New England Journal of Medicine
Dynamic in vivo response characteristics of three oximeters: Hewlett Packard 47201A, Biox III, and Nellcor N-100—Sleep (1987)
Contact us: Have a question about something you heard? Want to suggest a topic or guest? Contact us via email or visit our website.
Follow us: @‌PublicHealthPod on X
@‌JohnsHopkinsSPH on Instagram
@‌JohnsHopkinsSPH on Facebook
@‌PublicHealthOnCall on YouTube
Here's our RSS feed

About this episode: Pulse oximeters—devices used to read blood oxygen levels in hospitals and at home—are far less reliable for people with darker skin tones... Falsely normal readings create the potential for clinical staff to miss life-threatening conditions.
In this three-episode special series, we explore a longstanding issue that only caught the nation’s attention in recent years. In episode 1: How COVID-19 shined a light on an issue that was known, but largely ignored.
Listen to Part 2: What Went Wrong?
Listen to Part 3: Fixing Pulse Oximeters.
View the transcript for this episode.
Host: Annalies Winny is a co-producer of the Pulse Ox series for the Public Health On Call podcast, an associate editor for Global Health NOW, and a contributor for the Hopkins Bloomberg Public Health magazine.
Show links and related content: The Problem with Pulse Oximeters: A Long History of Racial Bias
Estimating COVID-19 Hospitalizations in the U.S.—JMIR Public Health Surveillance
How a Popular Medical Device Encodes Racial Bias–Amy Moran-Thomas
People with darker skin are 32% more likely to have pulse oximeters overestimate oxygen levels, report says–CNN
Racial Bias in Pulse Oximetry Measurement—The New England Journal of Medicine
Dynamic in vivo response characteristics of three oximeters: Hewlett Packard 47201A, Biox III, and Nellcor N-100—Sleep (1987)
Contact us: Have a question about something you heard? Want to suggest a topic or guest? Contact us via email or visit our website.
Follow us: @‌PublicHealthPod on X
@‌JohnsHopkinsSPH on Instagram
@‌JohnsHopkinsSPH on Facebook
@‌PublicHealthOnCall on YouTube
Here's our RSS feed

31 min

Top Podcasts In News

The Daily
The New York Times
Pod Save America
Crooked Media
The Tucker Carlson Show
Tucker Carlson Network
The Ben Shapiro Show
The Daily Wire
The Dan Bongino Show
Cumulus Podcast Network | Dan Bongino
Up First
NPR

More by Johns Hopkins University

Public Health On Call
The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts
Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Podcasts
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center
Johns Hopkins Medicine A Womans Journey: Health Insights that Matter
Johns Hopkins Medicine A Womans Journey
Bright Now
Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth (CTY)
Brain Matters – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts
Johns Hopkins Medicine