10 episodes

Weekly interviews on Eurasian politics, history and society.

SRB Podcast SRB Podcast

    • History
    • 4.8 • 121 Ratings

Weekly interviews on Eurasian politics, history and society.

    REEES Faculty Spotlight: James Pickett

    REEES Faculty Spotlight: James Pickett

    

    As you know the podcast is sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies at the University of Pittsburgh.

    Every semester we do a Center newsletter where we spotlight a few of our faculty.

    Here’s an audio profile of our featured faculty–James Pickett.

    • 11 min
    REEES Faculty Spotlight: Iknur Lider

    REEES Faculty Spotlight: Iknur Lider

    

    As you know the podcast is sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies at the University of Pittsburgh.

    Every semester we do a Center newsletter where we spotlight a few of our faculty.

    Here’s an audio profile of our featured faculty–Iknur Lider.

    • 12 min
    The Soviet-Third World Cultural Nexus

    The Soviet-Third World Cultural Nexus

    Would there have been a Third World without the Second? Although most historians write about these geopolitical blocs in reference to the West, the interdependence of the Second and Third Worlds remains a historical blind spot. This interconnection was evident in the production of Third World literature and cinema vis-à-vis the Soviet organized Afro-Asian Writers Association and the Tashkent Festival for African, Asian, and Latin American Film. While the cultural alliances between the Second and the Third World never achieved their stated aim – the literary and cinematic independence from the West. They did forge links that allowed now-canonical postcolonial authors, texts, and films to circulate across the non-Western world until the end of the Cold War. Here’s Rossen Djagalov with that story.

    Guest:

    Rossen Djagalov is an Assistant Professor of Russian at New York University and a member of the editorial collective of LeftEast. His interests lie in socialist culture globally and, more specifically, in the linkages between cultural producers and audiences in the USSR and abroad. His new book is From Internationalism to Postcolonialism: Literature and Cinema between the Second and the Third Worlds published by McGill-Queen’s University Press.

    Music:

    Grand Kalle & African Jazz, “Miwela Miwela”

    • 49 min
    Dmytro Dontsov and Ukrainian Nationalism

    Dmytro Dontsov and Ukrainian Nationalism

    Since 2014, Ukrainian nationalism has been a focus of intense debate inside and outside Ukraine. A central, and often overlooked figure in its history is Dmytro Dontsov, the founder of Ukrainian “integral nationalism” and so-called “spiritual father” of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists. Who was Dmytro Dontsov, and how did this erstwhile journalist, diplomat, literary critic, publicist, and ideologue, progress from heterodox Marxism, to avant-garde fascism, to theocratic traditionalism? Here’s Trevor Erlacher on Dontsov’s intellectual trajectories.

    Guest:

    Trevor Erlacher is a historian specializing in modern Ukraine and Ukrainian nationalism. He is currently the Academic Advisor, Program Coordinator, and Editor for the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies and the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. He’s the author of Ukrainian Nationalism in the Age of Extremes: An Intellectual Biography of Dmytro Dontsov published by Harvard University Press.

    Music:

    Sonic Youth, “Youth Against Fascism,” Dirty, 1992.

    • 53 min
    Belarus Protests in Pittsburgh

    Belarus Protests in Pittsburgh

    It’s been four months since mass protests erupted in Belarus against Aleksandr Lukashenko bid to stay power. The situation is a stalemate, for the lack of a better term. But despite the gridlock, massive changes are underway in Belarus. A popular political awakening has occurred. And this will continue no matter how many people Lukashenko’s security forces arrest. Or how long he remains president.

    Belarus is far from where I live in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. But even our small Belarusian community has organized to support their friends, family and compatriots. They’ve formed their own Facebook group, Belarusians in Western PA, and have been holding in-person and online actions since August.

    I went to one of their recent rallies. It was small, about 15 people, on the corner of E. Carson and 25th Street in Pittsburgh’s southside. I came to support my friends. But I also brought my Zoom recorder to interview people. I had no well thought-out agenda in mind. I just wanted to get a sense of where they stood and what they wanted us, Pittsburghers and Americans in general to know and do about the events in Belarus. And maybe, I hoped, the material might make for a short podcast

    • 10 min
    Russian Other, American Other

    Russian Other, American Other

    Russian views of America and American views of Russia have been fundamental to shaping relations and, to some extent, each nation’s self-image. Russian and American travelers tended to emphasize qualities of the other that their respective nations rejected. Through the Other, Russia and America reaffirmed their sense of self. So, what is the history of this othering from the 19th century to the present? What role did travel accounts, journalists, diplomats, and scholars play in shaping how Russia and the America positioned themselves geopolitically, culturally, and ideologically? Here’s Dina Fainberg and Victoria Zhuravleva to peel back the many layers to this relationship.

    Guests:

    Dina Fainberg is Assistant Professor in Modern History at City, University of London. She is an historian of US-Russia relations, Soviet media and propaganda, and Cold War Culture. She is the co-editor of Reconsidering Stagnation: Ideology and Exchange in the Brezhnev Era. Her book, Cold War Correspondents: Soviet and American Reporters on the Ideological Frontlines will be published in January 2021.

    Victoria Zhuravleva is a Professor of American History and International Relations, Chair of the American Studies Department and Vice-Dean of the Faculty of International Relations and Area Studies at the Russian State University for the Humanities, Moscow, Russia. Her field of research interests is American history with a specialization in Russian-American relations and U.S. foreign policy. She is author of many books and articles, including Understanding Russia in the United States: Images and Myths (in Russian), and editor of Russian/Soviet Studies in the United States, Amerikanistika in Russia: Mutual Representations in Academic Projects (in English).

    Music:

    James Brown, “Living in America”

    • 1 hr 31 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
121 Ratings

121 Ratings

GemmaGemmaSD ,

Best podcast on Russia!

I’ve learned so much listening to this podcast!

Sidewalkvocals ,

Educational & Entertaining w/ Great Topics

I recently discovered this podcast and I’ve listened to several episodes already—the host chooses fascinating topics I've either read very little about, or never encountered at all (and I like to think I consume a lot of media on history)! Definitely recommend giving it a listen.

LostLaker06 ,

Best Historical Podcast Out There

Sean is a great interviewer and thorough with his own research and gathering info on his guest and their subjects. Its a good balance between the different eras of Russia (Muscovy, Imperial, Soviet, Modern, etc.) and he does well to examine areas that do not garner much attention, such as what objects and possessions Red Army soldiers carried on them. I have purchased several books based off his guests and have not been disappointed.

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