23 episodes

The SRHM Podcast explores new research and emerging trends in the field of sexual and reproductive health and rights.

Sexual and Reproductive Health Matters or SRHM promotes sexual and reproductive health and rights globally. At the heart of SRHM is a multidisciplinary, open-access, peer-reviewed journal. SRHM also creates and participates in spaces that motivate improvements in research, policy, services and practice. It contributes to capacity building in knowledge generation.

Learn more at srhm.org.

Music by Tiber Krisztián and Salamon Botond
Sound editing by We Edit Podcasts

SRHM Podcast Sexual and Reproductive Health Matters (SRHM)

    • Science

The SRHM Podcast explores new research and emerging trends in the field of sexual and reproductive health and rights.

Sexual and Reproductive Health Matters or SRHM promotes sexual and reproductive health and rights globally. At the heart of SRHM is a multidisciplinary, open-access, peer-reviewed journal. SRHM also creates and participates in spaces that motivate improvements in research, policy, services and practice. It contributes to capacity building in knowledge generation.

Learn more at srhm.org.

Music by Tiber Krisztián and Salamon Botond
Sound editing by We Edit Podcasts

    Editor's Summary: Obstetric violence in the United States and other high-income countries

    Editor's Summary: Obstetric violence in the United States and other high-income countries

    In this episode we hear from the authors of a recent SRHM paper 'Obstetric violence in the United States and other high-income countries: an integrative review'.

    Dr. Lorraine Garcia is a Nurse-Scientist and practicing midwife and Dr. Brie Thumm is a certified nurse-midwife and Assistant Professor, both in association with the College of Nursing of the University of Colorado.

    We hear about the gap in knowledge that this paper addresses, findings that stood out to the authors personally and where to go from here in addressing obsetric violence in high-income countries.

    Useful links:

    Obstetric violence in the United States and other high-income countries: an integrative review

    SRHM Call for Papers 2024


    Related SRHM papers:

    Invisible wounds: obstetric violence in the United States Farah Diaz-Tello , J.D.

    Moving beyond disrespect and abuse: addressing the structural dimensions of obstetric violence Sadler et al.

    • 21 min
    30 Years of the International Conference on Population and Development: Advancing Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in an Era of Challenging Political Contexts

    30 Years of the International Conference on Population and Development: Advancing Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in an Era of Challenging Political Contexts

    This episode takes us through an important discussion that took place on April 17, 2024, organised by the University of Southern California's Institute on Inequalities in Global Health in partnership with Sexual and Reproductive Health Matters.

    Despite massive regressions in SRHR and anti-rights movements, 30 years later, the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) agenda continues to set a standard for people-centred development, acting as a global touchstone for SRHR and rights-based policies and programs. How has the current political climate impacted the fulfilment of this agenda?

    Listen to an incredible group of panellists reflect on the history and future of health and development in the current political climate.

    Moderators:

    Sofia Gruskin: Director, USC Institute on Inequalities
    in Global Health and Sapna Desai: SRHM Board of Trustees Co-Chair

    Panellists:      
    Bouchra Assarag: President of Together for Sexual and Reproductive Health Rights (Enssemble pour la Santé de la Reproduction et Droits (EDSSR) and Deputy Director of Studies in the National School of Public Health, Morocco.

    Gita Sen: Honorary Distinguished Professor of the Ramalingaswami Centre on Equity and Social Determinants of Health at the Public Health Foundation of India.

    Montasser Kamal: Former Deputy Director for Global Health Policy and Research at Global Affairs Canada, currently at International Development Research Centre.

    Uluk Batyrgaliev: Health Officer at Eurasian Coalition for Health, Rights, Gender and Sexual Diversity, Kyrgyztan.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    What do Oral Contraceptives have to do with Human Rights Abuses in Sport?

    What do Oral Contraceptives have to do with Human Rights Abuses in Sport?

    In this important one-hour podcast episode, listen to moderator Professor Alice M. Miller, J.D. (co-director of the GHJP of Yale Law and Public Health Schools), and the authors of a recently published SRHM paper (What do oral contraceptives have to do with human rights abuses in sport?), Katrina Karkazis, PhD, MPH (Professor, Sexuality, Women’s and Gender Studies at Amherst College) and Michele Krech, J.S.D. (Bigelow Fellow and Lecturer in Law at University of Chicago Law School).

    They discuss in detail how the Court of Arbitration of Sport and World Athletics rely on mistaken assumptions about oral contraceptives, and misused scientific evidence to uphold a coercive and medically unnecessary use of oral contraceptive pills for testosterone suppression, in female athletes with naturally high testosterone levels, as an eligibility criterion to compete in certain track events. This discussion took place a few days before an important event - the hearing of Olympic runner Caster Semenya's appeal against these regulations, by the European Court of Human Rights on May 15, 2024, on the grounds that these are discriminatory to people with differences in sexual development. Semenya, who is legally female, was coerced to take oral contraceptives to reduce her natural testosterone levels, to be able to compete in track events 400m. and beyond, a medical intervention that negatively impacted her health and career.

    We also hear from Dr. Otmar Kloiber, Secretary General of the World Medical Association, who discusses his stance and concerns on these coercive regulations brought about by World Athletics. Moreover, we hear from Dr. Payoshini Mitra, an athlete rights defender who actively campaigns for the abolition of sex testing practices in female sports, talks to Ugandan former running champion Annet Negesa, who was coerced to undergo an invasive procedure mandated by the World Athletics to lower her testosterone levels.

    Useful links:


    What do oral contraceptives have to do with human rights abuses in sport?

    • 59 min
    Laws governing access to sexual health services and information: contents, protections, and restrictions

    Laws governing access to sexual health services and information: contents, protections, and restrictions

    In this episode, we hear from two authors of the paper 'Laws governing access to sexual health services and information: contents, protections, and restrictions', Laura Ferguson and Sarah Emoto.

    Laura Ferguson is the Director of Research at the University of Southern California Institute on Inequalities in Global Health and an Associate Professor of Population and Public Health Sciences. She is also an Associate Editor right here at SRHM. Sarah Emoto is a Research Program Specialist at the USC Institute on Inequalities in Global Health. 


    Their paper reviewed 40 laws in English, French, and Spanish from 18 countries to understand how many and which sexual health services and information countries ensure in their laws, which sexual health services are illegal, and which people are protected from discrimination in accessing these services.



    They found that countries use many different types of laws to ensure access to sexual health services or information, and most countries do not cover the same types or number of sexual health services. There are also differences in which people are specifically protected from discrimination in the laws we reviewed.



    These findings are important because they may help countries identify ways that access to sexual health services and information could be improved so as to improve people’s sexual health. They may also guide future research.


    Useful links:

    Laws governing access to sexual health services and information: contents, protections, and restrictions

    SRHM Open Issue 2024

    • 12 min
    Call for Papers: SRHM 2024 Open Issue

    Call for Papers: SRHM 2024 Open Issue

    In this episode, SRHM Associate Editor Nina Sun, talks to Executive Editor, Emma Pitchforth and Managing Editor, Pete Chapman, about an exciting new call for papers for the 2024 Open Issue.

    SRHM is calling for submissions on all SRHR topics, particularly those which bring a rights focus to neglected and marginalised issues, as well as those whose lead authors are from the Global South. We hope that this year’s Open Issue will bring documentation and analysis of progressive examples of upholding SRHR, as well as addressing critical gaps in the field


    Useful links:

    Call for Papers 2024 Open Issue

    Instructions for authors

    ⁠More about SRHM⁠

    Read papers from the SRHM Journal

    • 6 min
    Editor's Summary: Comprehensive sexuality education for outside of school settings

    Editor's Summary: Comprehensive sexuality education for outside of school settings

    In our latest podcast episode, Associated Editor of SRHM, Nina Sun, speaks to two colleagues from the United Nations Population Fund - Petar Mladenov, a Programme Analyst for youth-led advocacy, comprehensive sexuality education (CSE), and Ilya Zhukov, a Technical Specialist and global CSE focal point. 

    Young people living with HIV, young people selling sex, and young people from marginalised backgrounds are often left behind from CSE interventions and there is a pressing need to tailor CSE programs in order to include them, and improve their sexual wellbeing.


    In this episode, listen to the panelists engage in an enlightening discussion on how to improve CSE program integrity, quality, and fidelity for left-behind populations and how their work with local partners and research institutions are helping to address research gaps for the success of these programs in different countries. They also discuss how they measure and evaluate facilitators that enhance inclusive CSE programs, and efforts to improve the facilitators' performance in different contexts.


    Useful links from the SRHM journal issue:



    SRHM issue - Beyond the classroon: Comprehensive sexuality education for outside of school settings



    Comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) programming adaptations in response to disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic



    The International Technical and Programmatic Guidance on Out-of-School
    Comprehensive Sexuality Education – an evidence-informed approach for
    non-formal, out-of-school programmes reaching young people from left-behind populations

    • 13 min

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