54 min

Sydney Film Festival - Flathead Director Jaydon Martin on Dismantling the Modern Australian Identity via the Docu-Fiction Experience The Curb

    • Film Interviews

One of the finest films having its Australian premiere at the festival is Jaydon Martin's stunning feature debut film Flathead. This fiction-documentary hybrid film follows Cass Cumerford, a bloke near the end of his days who returns to Bundaberg, the region he grew up. Swaying into the town, he finds consolation and support with various religious sects that have sprung up in the land before he flows into the life of Andrew, a Chinese-Australian fish and chip shop owner who is dealing with his own understanding of mortality.
Flathead follows these real figures as they're nudged along a partly-fictional narrative, and as the film plays with a sublime black and white presentation, it sways into a dreamlike state, providing a highly affecting story about modern Australia.
It's that notion of what a modern Australia is that drives the following conversation with Jaydon, who took four years to make the film and had to leave Australia to realise what it was that he needed to make. Flitting into some of the scenes, and delivering a closing duet with Cass, is fellow filmmaker Brodie Poole, a documentarian in his own right who has also essayed what modern Australia looks like on screen with his documentary General Hercules. Both Brodie and Jaydon are engaging in an essential conversation right now about Australian identity and culture, and in doing so, they're also reasserting the notion of who gets to tell stories on screen in this place we call Australia.
Flathead is an experience like no other, and my words here barely scrape the thematic text of the film, nor do they do justice to what Jaydon is putting forward as a filmmaker. As a nation, there is a shortage of filmmakers who operate in the realm of social realism, and I'm hoping beyond hope that Jaydon continues down this path. If so, then we will be richly rewarded as his body of work builds over the years.
For now, do what you can to see Flathead. It's one of the finest Australian films of the year.
It screens on 12 June and 15 June at the Sydney Film Festival. For tickets, visit sff.org.au.

Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

One of the finest films having its Australian premiere at the festival is Jaydon Martin's stunning feature debut film Flathead. This fiction-documentary hybrid film follows Cass Cumerford, a bloke near the end of his days who returns to Bundaberg, the region he grew up. Swaying into the town, he finds consolation and support with various religious sects that have sprung up in the land before he flows into the life of Andrew, a Chinese-Australian fish and chip shop owner who is dealing with his own understanding of mortality.
Flathead follows these real figures as they're nudged along a partly-fictional narrative, and as the film plays with a sublime black and white presentation, it sways into a dreamlike state, providing a highly affecting story about modern Australia.
It's that notion of what a modern Australia is that drives the following conversation with Jaydon, who took four years to make the film and had to leave Australia to realise what it was that he needed to make. Flitting into some of the scenes, and delivering a closing duet with Cass, is fellow filmmaker Brodie Poole, a documentarian in his own right who has also essayed what modern Australia looks like on screen with his documentary General Hercules. Both Brodie and Jaydon are engaging in an essential conversation right now about Australian identity and culture, and in doing so, they're also reasserting the notion of who gets to tell stories on screen in this place we call Australia.
Flathead is an experience like no other, and my words here barely scrape the thematic text of the film, nor do they do justice to what Jaydon is putting forward as a filmmaker. As a nation, there is a shortage of filmmakers who operate in the realm of social realism, and I'm hoping beyond hope that Jaydon continues down this path. If so, then we will be richly rewarded as his body of work builds over the years.
For now, do what you can to see Flathead. It's one of the finest Australian films of the year.
It screens on 12 June and 15 June at the Sydney Film Festival. For tickets, visit sff.org.au.

Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

54 min