175 episodes

In the Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae, Dr Jemma Purdey, Dr Charlotte Setijadi and Dr Annisa Beta present an extended interview each fortnight with experts on Indonesian politics, foreign policy, culture, language and more. Find all the Talking Indonesia podcasts and more at the Indonesia at Melbourne blog.

Talking Indonesia Talking Indonesia

    • News
    • 4.5 • 18 Ratings

In the Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae, Dr Jemma Purdey, Dr Charlotte Setijadi and Dr Annisa Beta present an extended interview each fortnight with experts on Indonesian politics, foreign policy, culture, language and more. Find all the Talking Indonesia podcasts and more at the Indonesia at Melbourne blog.

    Dr Philips Vermonte - The Road to 2024

    Dr Philips Vermonte - The Road to 2024

    Road to 2024 - Philips Vermonte

    The Indonesian government and General Elections Commission (KPU) have yet to agree on a date for the next legislative and presidential elections, which must be held by May 2024. Even though the concurrent elections are still more than two years away, with no incumbent candidate on the 2024 presidential ticket, gossip and speculation about potential contenders, coalitions and pairings is already well underway.  

    As Indonesia looks toward 2024, what issues are expected to dominate campaigning? Who are some of the likely candidates to emerge in the battle for president, and what sort legacy is President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo hoping to leave behind?  

    In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Jemma Purdey discusses these issues and more with Dr Philips Vermonte from the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) and International Islamic University of Indonesia (UIII). 

    The Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Dr Annisa Beta from the University of Melbourne, and Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the Singapore Management University.

    Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight. Catch up on previous episodes here, subscribe via iTunes or listen via your favourite podcasting app.

    Image: ANTARA FOTO/OKY LUKAMSYAH

    • 42 min
    Prof Arief Anshory Yusuf: Covid-19, Economic Recovery and the Knowledge Economy - Policy in Focus

    Prof Arief Anshory Yusuf: Covid-19, Economic Recovery and the Knowledge Economy - Policy in Focus

    The Covid-19 pandemic has caused the most severe economic contraction since Indonesia's 1997-98 financial crisis, posing a stern challenge for recovery. Covid-19 struck amid a push by the Indonesian government to increase the role of science and technology in driving economic development. The government enacted a new Science and Technology Law in 2019, and has also formed a new National Research and Innovation Agency, known as BRIN.

    In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae chats with Professor Arief Anshory Yusuf, founding director of the SDGs Centre at Padjajaran University, about the economic impacts of Covid-19, Indonesia's likely trajectory for recovery, and the prospects for a transition as part of this recovery to a so-called knowledge economy - an economy based on the ability to produce and make use of knowledge.

    Today’s episode is the latest in the “Policy in Focus” series of Talking Indonesia episodes, supported by the Knowledge Sector Initiative (KSI), a partnership between the Australian and Indonesian governments that aims to improve the use of evidence in development policymaking. This series will appear periodically in alternate weeks to the regular Talking Indonesia episodes. The views expressed in this podcast episode do not represent the views of the Australian or Indonesian governments. 

    The Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Annisa Beta from the University of Melbourne’s School of Culture and Communication, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, and Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the Singapore Management University.

    Photo credit: Yulius Satria Wijaya for Antara Foto

    • 40 min
    Prof. Karen Strassler - Images and Politics

    Prof. Karen Strassler - Images and Politics

    Please note that this episode discusses gender violence that some people may find disturbing or triggering. Listener discretion is advised.

    Images have always played an important role in Indonesia, not just in everyday life, but also in its ever-changing political landscape. Terms like pencitraan (political image building) are commonly heard during election season. On social media, buzzers actively attempt to shape the public image of various social and political issues. Meanwhile, posters of murdered human rights activist Munir Said Thalib have become almost as iconic as the man himself.

    What role do images play in political life in Indonesia? How do the public consume political imagery? Why do certain images gain political significance?

    In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Annisa Beta discusses these questions and more with Karen Strassler, Professor of Anthropology at the City University of New York. Professor Strassler's work focuses on the social lives and political work of images, looking into the relationship between visuality and political imaginaries. Her recently published second book, "Demanding Images: Democracy, Mediation, and the Image-Event in Indonesia", investigates how public images affected the political arena during the turbulent period of political upheaval and technological transformation following the fall of Soeharto.

    Image source: jendoelhadisantosa https://www.deviantart.com/jendoelhadisantosa/art/MUNIR-in-WPAP-308894220

    • 33 min
    Academic Freedom - Dr Robertus Robet

    Academic Freedom - Dr Robertus Robet

    Dr Robertus Robet – Academic Freedom

    Recently, a number of high-profile cases have highlighted growing threats to academic freedom in Indonesia, amid a broader environment of shrinking civic space. Last month, the imprisonment of Dr Saiful Mahdi from Syaih Kuala University in Aceh, under the draconian Law on Information and Electronic Transactions (known as ITE Law), brought condemnation from academics and civil rights groups across Indonesia and abroad.

    In the face of widespread agreement that authorities had overreached, President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo eventually granted Saiful amnesty. But this was just one example of the pressure academics and students have faced under the Jokowi administration. And while the government has acknowledged the need for reform of the ITE Law, serious structural, legal and cultural restrictions remain in the higher education sector, and beyond. What is driving these limits on academic freedom? What has been the impact of the ITE Law on academic freedom? What topics are off limits, and are curbs on academic freedom part of Indonesia’s broader democratic decline?

    In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Jemma Purdey discusses these issues and more with Dr Robertus Robet, head of sociology at the State University of Jakarta (UNJ), and a frequent contributor to Indonesia at Melbourne.

    The Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Dr Annisa Beta from the University of Melbourne, and Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the Singapore Management University.

    Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight. Catch up on previous episodes here, subscribe via iTunes or listen via your favourite podcasting app.

    Relevant links:
    https://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/attempts-to-revise-draconian-ite-law-stumble/
    https://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/luhut-reporting-activists-for-defamation-is-another-blow-to-freedom-of-expression/
    https://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/academic-freedom-another-victim-of-the-ite-law/

    Image: ANTARA FOTO/ANIS EFIZUDIN

    • 27 min
    Prof. Adi Utarini - Eliminating Dengue

    Prof. Adi Utarini - Eliminating Dengue

    Last month, Time published its annual list of the 100 Most Influential People. Under the category of ‘Pioneers’, alongside pop star Billie Eilish, was an Indonesian scientist from the University of Gadjah Mada (UGM), Professor Adi Utarini.

    Professor Utarini is head of the Eliminate Dengue Project at the UGM Faculty of Medicine, funded by the Tahija Foundation and run in collaboration with the World Mosquito Program at Monash University. In 2020, the team published the results of 10-year study, including a 3-year randomised controlled trial, examining the effectiveness of introducing Wolbachia bacteria into Aedes aegypti mosquitoes to reduce their capacity to transmit dengue. The findings of the research were described by the World Health Organisation as epochal and a breakthrough in the fight to eliminate dengue and potentially other mosquito-borne viruses.

    This is particularly significant given that dengue affects almost 400 million people around the world annually and is described by WHO as one of the 10 greatest threats to world health. In Indonesia each year, an estimated 7 million people are infected.

    In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Jemma Purdey talks to Professor Utarini about how she and her team in Yogyakarta conducted their study and what they discovered. Does this bring us a step closer to eliminating dengue?

    In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Jemma Purdey talks to Professor Adi Utarini, Professor in Public Health and Project Leader of Eliminate Dengue Project Yogyakarta, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada.

    The Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Dr Annisa Beta from the University of Melbourne, and Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the Singapore Management University.

    Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight. Catch up on previous episodes here, subscribe via iTunes or listen via your favourite podcasting app.

    Image: World Mosquito Program

    • 35 min
    Dr Sophie Chao - Papua, Food and Racism

    Dr Sophie Chao - Papua, Food and Racism

    Despite the fact that Indonesia’s deforestation rate reached a historic low in 2020, the social, cultural, and ecological wellbeing of people whose livelihoods depend on forests has continued to suffer greatly. The indigenous Marind people in Papua, for example, have seen 1.2 million hectares of their lands and forests targeted for oil palm and timber plantations as part of the Merauke Integrated Food and Energy Estate. This has led not only to food and water insecurity but also fundamental shifts in the food and eating habits of the Marind people. Why is this happening?

    Joining Talking Indonesia for a second time is Dr Sophie Chao, postdoctoral research associate in the Department of History, University of Sydney. Dr Annisa Beta chats to Chao about her extensive work with the Marind people and the intersections of race, food, and development in Papua.

    Chao has recently published articles on gastrocolonialism and on the political symbolism of the monkey from the perspective of West Papuan indigenous communities. Chao's first book, In the Shadow of the Palms: More-Than-Human Becomings in West Papua, was awarded the inaugural Duke University Press Scholars of Color First Book Award in June 2021 and is forthcoming with Duke University Press in June 2022. In her first appearance on the podcast in 2019, Chao spoke with Talking Indonesia co-host Dr Jemma Purdey about the violence, displacement, and dispossession experienced by the Marind people.

    Chao previously worked for the international human rights organisation Forest Peoples Programme in the United Kingdom and Indonesia and has undertaken consultancies for the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, and the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil. For more information about Sophie, please visit morethanhumanworlds.com.

    • 43 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
18 Ratings

18 Ratings

floatingpanda ,

Great podcast

Fantastically done and well informed!

Datu Adiatma ,

Good podcast, need to improve audio quality

This podcast provides comprehensive and thought provoking interviews and discussions on indonesia’s social politic issues, yet there is still plenty room for improvement on the audio quality.

Podcast yang bagus, tapi masih ada aspek yang perlu ditingkatkan, terumata di sisi kualitas audio.

Selamat!

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