153 episodes

Hosted by Cassidy Cash, That Shakespeare Life takes you behind the curtain and into the real life of William Shakespeare. Get bonus episodes on Patreon
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

That Shakespeare Life Cassidy Cash

    • History
    • 4.8 • 49 Ratings

Hosted by Cassidy Cash, That Shakespeare Life takes you behind the curtain and into the real life of William Shakespeare. Get bonus episodes on Patreon
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    The Battle of Lepanto, 1571

    The Battle of Lepanto, 1571

    In 1571, William Shakespeare was only 7 years old, but the naval battle that occurred that year was pivotal forEngland, and indeed the Christian world, that continued to be celebrated and written about for centuries afterShakespeare. The Battle of Lepanto is the last naval battle fought exclusively with rowing vessels, known as galley warfare, and overall was a surprising naval victory for Catholics. Even James VI wrote poetry titledLepanto, that was in high demand as printed literature in England well into the start of the 17th century. Here today to discuss with us the geopolitics of the day and the Ottoman Empire that Shakespeare refers to as “the general enemy Ottoman” in 1603, is our guest and author of the book titled Battle of Lepanto, 1571, Nic Fields
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    • 57 min
    The Real Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn Compared to All is True

    The Real Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn Compared to All is True

    Explore the real life of Henry VIII against some of the stories inside Shakespeare's play, All is True, with our guest, Kat Marchant.
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    • 30 min
    16th Century Romance Fiction

    16th Century Romance Fiction

    Did you know there were romantic fiction publications in Shakespeare's lifetime? Of course they weren't romance novels, because the novel as a format was not invented, but the romance genre was a live and well. You may recognize chivalric romances, which include knights in shining armor, fighting dragons, overcoming giants, and other quest-worthy elements. In Shakespeare's lifetime, there were romantic tales as well, but as you might expect from the Renaissance era, 16-17th century romance stories had their own unique spin on things. Surprisingly, Shakespeare never uses the word itself, "romance," in his plays despite featuring a myriad of love stories. To help us sort out what "romance" meant for the 16th century, and exactly what we should know about the romance genre when it comes to prose fiction in Shakespeare's lifetime, is our guest, and expert in 16-17th century literature, Helen Hackett. 
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    • 41 min
    Declension of Pronouns with David Crystal

    Declension of Pronouns with David Crystal

    In the play, The Merry Wives of Windsor, as well as Hamlet and Richard III, the phrase “declension of pronouns” that comes up as a description of language. That’s not a phrase that I remember being taught in English class, and instead relates to Latin, the language of education for Shakespeare’s lifetime, and indeed across Europe. Here today to explain for us exactly what a “declension” might be, how to use them, and what it helps to understand about things like nouns, pronouns, and spelling for 16th century English when you explore Shakespeare’s plays, is our friend, and returning guest here to That Shakespeare Life, Professor David Crystal
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    • 27 min
    The Life of Mary Frith, known as Moll Cutpurse

    The Life of Mary Frith, known as Moll Cutpurse

    One of the most famous criminals of Shakespeare’s lifetime was Mary Frith, known as MollCutpurse. Her character is featured in several plays contemporary to Shakespeare, and itseems her real life persona was even more flamboyant than those represented onstage. MollCutpurse was a notorious pickpocket who made a name for herself in early modern England asa thief and an entertainer, who stood out from the crowd because she liked to dress, and act,like a man. Challenging cultural norms was Moll’s bread and butter. She wore men’s clothing,smoked a pipe, and operated as both a thief and a pimp, being hired to find lovers for men andwomen among London’s middle class. Here today to share with us the colorful real life history ofa woman whose shock value continues to impress those that learn about her, is historian andauthor ofMary Frith, Moll Cutpurse and the Development of an Early Modern Criminal CelebrityFor the Journal of Early Modern Studies, Lauren Liebe.
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    • 27 min
    16th Century Plague, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Microbiology

    16th Century Plague, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Microbiology

    Plague is the horrible sickness that reoccurs throughout the life of William Shakespeare, and many listeners will know that plague is to blame for several closings of playhouses around London throughout the 16-17th century. However, what does that word mean, precisely? What symptoms did people have when afflicted with plague, and how was it transmitted from person to person? The play Romeo and Juliet offers some evidence of plague responses when we see the messenger detained by confinement in a plague house, but our guest this week shares that there were some much more surprising—and dangerous--- remedies utilized in cities like London, including canon fire, to try and prevent spread of plague. To better understand what plague is, how it was treated in the 16-17th century, what the medical community understood (and didn’t) about microorganisms, and why in the world shooting off canons in the city was considered an essential part of plague prevention, we have invited our guest, and author of “Medicine and Society in Early Modern Europe” for Cambridge University Press, Dr. Mary Lindemann to the show today, to answer these questions. 
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    • 46 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
49 Ratings

49 Ratings

cinderelochka ,

ROUND OF APPLAUSE!

Let’s give a huge round of applause to this remarkable show. Entertaining, so well researched, informative, fun & unique! I love this host, as as a fellow American Shakespearean scholar I’m always stunned by how much I learn from these episodes… this, coming from a woman who has studied this man professionally/academically! She blows me away with her knowledge and most of all passion that oozes from the presentation in each episode. Never stop this series. Thank you!!

Bad at Thinking of Nicknames ,

Love the show!

This has become one of my favorite podcasts and I look forward to it each week.

cpmnc ,

Fun and informative!

This is exactly what I was looking for in my search for a Shakespeare podcast- an in-depth look at the history and culture of his time. The interview style makes for easy listening while still offering a lot of insight!

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