21 episodes

That's My JAMstack! is an interview podcast outlining various developers' methods of utilizing the JAMstack

That's my JAMstack Bryan Robinson

    • Technology

That's My JAMstack! is an interview podcast outlining various developers' methods of utilizing the JAMstack

    Denis Kostrzewa on JAMstack-first agencies, finding your stack, talking with clients and more

    Denis Kostrzewa on JAMstack-first agencies, finding your stack, talking with clients and more

    Quick show notes


    Our Guest: Denis Kostrzewa
    What he'd like for you to see: The Bejamas blog and Twitter
    His JAMstack Jams: Gatsby | NextJS
    His Musical Jam: Maceo Plex, Mind Against, Apparat, GusGus


    Our sponsor this week: TakeShape

    Transcript

    Bryan Robinson 0:02

    Hello everyone, welcome back to another episode of that's my JAMstack the podcast where we ask that most important of questions, what's your jam in the JAMstack? On this week's episode, we're hearing insights from the world of JAMstack agencies with Denis Kostrzewa, the CEO and co founder of the JAMstack-first agency Bejamas. Before we dive into those insights, I want to welcome back our sponsor take shape. If you're interested in their content platform, be sure to stick around after the interview to hear more, or head on over to take shape.io slash that's my JAMstack for more information. Alright guys, well, thanks for being on the show today and taking the time to chat with us.


    Denis Kostrzewa 0:39

    Yeah, thanks, Bryan. Thanks for having me.


    Bryan Robinson 0:41

    Cool. So tell us a little bit about yourself. What do you do for work? What do you do for fun and all that good stuff?


    Denis Kostrzewa 0:46

    Yep. So I'm Denis. I'm the co founder and CEO of Bejamas, the first agency and for professionally, I'm not coding any websites anymore. But what I do right now is scoping projects for companies. Not approaching us, proposing solutions to them managing internal accounting processes as well as hiring new developers. For fun, to be totally honest, grumpy john was is this is enough fun for me. But about from from from the business, I really like to read books on psychology, decision making philosophy and evolution.


    Bryan Robinson 1:20

    What are you reading right now?


    Denis Kostrzewa 1:23

    Right now I'm reading


    Denis Kostrzewa 1:25

    the book. Right now I'm actually not reading any of those pipes. I started reading mirta echo for Colt and boom. So it's a it's a fiction book. Very


    Bryan Robinson 1:37

    nice. So so you get a little bit of a little bit of fiction, a little bit of pleasure in your life too.


    Denis Kostrzewa 1:42

    Yeah, exactly.


    Bryan Robinson 1:45

    Alright, so So obviously, you are a co founder of a JAMstack first agency, but what was your entry point into into the JAMstack or static sites or whatever it was at the time?


    Denis Kostrzewa 1:54

    Yeah, so it's a bigger story. I think it will be great to kind of give you guys To everyone listening, a bit of a background, how we how we get started and why we get started in the first place. So we were starting a local business three years ago, aiming to solve a very specific problem on the pitch was basically ship simple websites to local local businesses. And we will be later managing those sites. So we've been looking after a set of tools that will allow us to build sites which are pretty easy to maintain. If we thought about having, for example, 10 websites in maintenance mode for our customers, WordPress or Drupal on any other monolithic solution was a no go for us. Because, for example, the news updates one has to do if if you have a Drupal, WordPress website.


    Denis Kostrzewa 2:47

    But another important thing for us was the security. Again, if we had 10 or more websites, and we have to take responsibility for what's happening on those websites, we wanted to make sure that we are picking the rights posted for the job. And based on those two requirements on the model, repeat myself, all the obvious, monolithic choices didn't make any sense. So we started to dig deeper into what's available out there. And content the idea of static site generation. So yeah, we decided to take it for right and both our first site with Google, after a couple of months, we are the next day or some Gadsby to the mix. And after approximately a year of playing with these tools we found nullify, which

    Colby Fayock On Mapping (like… the world), Gatsby, science and more

    Colby Fayock On Mapping (like… the world), Gatsby, science and more

    Quick show notes


    Our Guest: Colby Fayock
    What he'd like for you to see: His blog posts

    His work to help JAMstackers use Leaflet:
    His Gatsby Leaflet starter
    Getting started with Leaflet
    Santa tracker with leaflet
    NASA GIBS for map imagery

    His JAMstack Jams: Gatsby | Netlify
    His Musical Jam: Patterns - Dangerous Intentions


    Our sponsor this week: TakeShape

    Transcript

    Bryan Robinson 0:02

    Welcome everyone to another episode of That's My JAMstack the podcast where we explore the inner psyche of JAMstackers everywhere asking the simple question, what's your jam in the JAMstack. On today's episode, we talked to Colby Fayock, a senior front end engineer with element 84. But before we dive into the interview, let me shout out to our sponsor take shape. Stick around after the episode to learn more about their content platform or head on over to take shape.io slash That's My JAMstack for more information.


    Bryan Robinson 0:31

    Colby thanks for being on the show today.


    Colby Fayock 0:33

    Thanks for having me.


    Bryan Robinson 0:33

    Alright, so let's let's start out tell us a little bit about yourself about what you do for work, what you do for fun, that sort of thing.


    Colby Fayock 0:39

    Sure. So I'm a senior front end engineer and UX designer at Element84. For a little bit about us, we focused on bringing remote sensing and Life Sciences data to the cloud. So that's usually like satellite data and health data. But once that's in the cloud, that's kind of where I stepped in and put you eyes in front of that. So some things that I'm working on right now are a dashboard.


    Colby Fayock 0:59

    For testing a commercial satellite, and we're also working on a mapping interface for helping first responders tackle natural disasters like Wow, so like a big use case for that was working with people who were actually in it for the campfire California wildfires.


    Bryan Robinson 1:16

    Oh, wow. Very cool. So I curiosity. You're building interfaces? Do you consider yourself more on the design side or more on the developer side, even though you're working in code, obviously.


    Colby Fayock 1:27

    Yeah, so I definitely am more on the front end engineering side. It's kind of funny because I started off more on the design side, but as I kind of learned and learn, I've just slowly moved the needle to the engineering side. But that said, I still thoroughly enjoy both aspects of it. And usually I'm still the one doing the wires and such on the projects that we're working on.


    Bryan Robinson 1:48

    Cool. Now, what do you do in your in your free time outside of work?


    Colby Fayock 1:51

    So a lot of the times when we when we can figure it out, I like to travel with my wife. We just got back from a trip to Southeast Asia, which was pretty cool.


    Colby Fayock 2:00

    But aside from that, you know, I, I do really enjoy coding, but probably spent too much time watching TV movies. And lately, I've been trying to push myself to write more. So I've been putting a lot of articles up on Free Code Camp. And that actually inspired me from a co worker who kind of gave me the idea that, you know, there's a lot of ways to look at different articles, right, rather than I kind of had that imposter syndrome. But I'm able to get past that. And it's been successful. So far,


    Bryan Robinson 2:27

    I'm a firm believer that anyone who's writing code can benefit from their own blog in the future. Like if you're if you're writing and you saw the problem, write about it, and then you Google it down the road, and you'll be the response.


    Colby Fayock 2:39

    Right, exactly. That's a good book kind of way to bookmark your solutions. Exactly.


    Bryan Robinson 2:43

    And so what's the what's the best place you've traveled or your favorite place to go when you're traveling?


    Colby Fayock 2:49

    You know, Southeast Asia was probably my craziest experience

    Khaled Garbaya on Gatsby, Create React App, modularity and more

    Khaled Garbaya on Gatsby, Create React App, modularity and more

    Quick show notes


    Our Guest: Khaled Garbaya | On Twitter: @khaled_garbaya
    What he'd like for you to see: Moving from create-react-app to Gatsby Course | JAMstack newsletter | Live streaming
    His JAMstack Jams: Gatsby | Netlify | Contentful
    His Musical Jam: Eminem's Latest album


    Our sponsor this week: TakeShape

    Transcript

    Bryan Robinson 0:01

    Hello everyone and welcome to another episode of That's My JAMstack the podcast where we asked the pressing question, "What is your jam in the JAMstack?" I'm your host, Bryan Robinson. And this week I'm excited to have on the show the amazing Khaled Garbaya. Khaled is an engineering manager at Contentful and runs an amazing JAMstack newsletter.


    Bryan Robinson 0:20

    We're also welcoming back this week TakeShape as our sponsor, stick around after the episode to find out more about their content platform or head over to takeshape.io/thatsmyjamstack for more information.


    Bryan Robinson 0:34

    Thanks for being on the show today, Khaled.


    Khaled Garbaya 0:35

    Hey, thanks for having me.


    Bryan Robinson 0:38

    So tell us a little about yourself. What do you do for work? What do you do for fun, all that stuff.


    Khaled Garbaya 0:43

    So my name is Khaled. I'm originally from Tunisia, which is like a small country in the North Africa. And it's been I've been living in Berlin for over six years now. I am an engineering manager at Contentful And I love learning and building and public. And I also traveled for food. So that's that's usually my life. Yeah, that's, that's basically me.


    Khaled Garbaya 1:17

    I started, I don't know if this is relevant or some people might not even remember the days of Flash. So I started as a Flash developer and moved my way there to like gaming and then now it's more like web and servers and now people debugging people instead of code, which is also a lot of fun. Yeah, and I do also like some live streaming, and I teach some web development related and JAMstack related topics over on Egghead or YouTube or I also do some streaming in Twitch so I'm all over the place.


    Bryan Robinson 1:57

    Cool. Make sure you give me those links. I'll pop them in the show notes. You say you, you travel for food? So how much are you traveling and maybe what's your What's your favorite country or city for food?


    Khaled Garbaya 2:10

    I mean, my favorite city is definitely Italy so far. I mean, not city but like an entire country. Yeah, my, the best city like I go there every year. We must go there at least for a week. It's Sardinia it's like a small island in Italy by the beach, and there's some great food and I want to be like always, like relax. So that's my style of vacation. I'm no hiker, or I do sometimes, but I'm just I'm lazy. I don't want to do a lot of activities.


    Bryan Robinson 2:45

    I can definitely get that I spent a week in Italy and did way too much and would rather just relax on the beach.


    Khaled Garbaya 2:53

    Yeah, so I visited few cities hunting for food. Napoli also I went to the Holy Land of pizza. Rome is kind of an open museum. It's an amazing country to music also my country's full of food. So it's a nice to always visit family and have some food. Whereas I went to the US few, like two times, but just San Francisco. I don't know. I mean, usually, it maybe it's not the US.


    Bryan Robinson 3:25

    Sure.


    Khaled Garbaya 3:26

    And yeah, traveling through Europe because it's, I mean, Europe here is like, very accessible and easy to go through. It's not like 10 hours flight. I think the furthest country was Japan. Last year, it was like magical.


    Bryan Robinson 3:44

    Very cool, whole, whole whole different kind of plane existence in a lot of ways.


    Bryan Robinson 3:49

    Cool. So So let's talk about the JAMstack a little bit. So what was your kind of your entry point into this philosophy, whether that's JAMstack itself nowadays or static

    Jason Lengstorf on the edge cases, rediscovering common knowledge and much more

    Jason Lengstorf on the edge cases, rediscovering common knowledge and much more

    Quick show notes


    Our Guest: Jason Lengstorf
    What he'd like for you to see: His Egghead courses on JAMstack and Gatsby | His Gatsby and JAMstack courses on Frontend Masters
    His JAMstack Jams: "But yeah, I'm a big fan of, I don't know, I just like playing this stuff." So here's a list of the stuff

    Gatsby
    Svelte
    Eleventy
    NuxtJS
    Gridsome

    His Musical Jam: "Final Form" by Sampa the Great


    Other Technology Mentioned


    Hasura
    OAuth
    OneGraph


    Our sponsor this week: TakeShape

    Transcript

    Bryan Robinson 0:02

    Hey everyone, welcome to That's My JAMstack, the podcast where we dare to ask the question, what is your jam in the JAMstack. I'm your host, Bryan Robinson and today I'm super excited about our guest. He's a principal developer experience engineer at Netlify and the host of the great video series Learn with Jason. I'm talking of course about Jason Lengstorf.


    Bryan Robinson 0:22

    But before we dive in, I did want to mention our sponsor TakeShape is back again this week. I'll tell you more about them after the interview. But if you're interested in learning more before that head on over to takeshape.io/thatsmyjamstack to find out what their content platforms all about.


    Bryan Robinson 0:43

    Alright, Jason, thanks for being on the show with us today.


    Jason Lengstorf 0:45

    Yeah, thanks for having me.


    Bryan Robinson 0:46

    Awesome. So so I would hope that a lot of people in the audience know who you are, at least from the past couple years, but go ahead and give us a shout about who you are, what you do for work, what you do for fun, that sort of thing. Sure.


    Jason Lengstorf 0:57

    So I am a developer experience engineer at Netlify, which means that I'm kind of in between engineering and Dev Rel. I also host a show called Learn with Jason where I pair program with people in the community. We learn something new in 90 minutes. I am also a occasional blogger I'd write a lot about sometimes about code mostly about the the process of coding so kind of the meta work or the Yak shaving so to speak.


    Jason Lengstorf 1:30

    For fun, I am a I call myself a mediocre bartender. I love food. So I we cook a lot. You know, I'm kind of deep down a rabbit hole, I make my grind my own meat and you know, do that. We make bread from scratch and I like to do cocktail like you know, bartending kind of stuff like that. I make my own cocktails and stuff. It's good.


    Bryan Robinson 1:51

    So what is the tastiest cocktail that you make?


    Jason Lengstorf 1:54

    Okay, the taste is one that I make. I will usually I just make other bartenders, good cocktails. I have I made one up. My partner asked me to make something that tasted like Christmas. And so I did kind of a riff on on like a classic Negroni build, but it was rum and spice liquors. So it kind of has this really Alpine kind of Christmasy flavor.


    Bryan Robinson 2:21

    Alpine like a taste like a pine tree or...


    Jason Lengstorf 2:23

    So the one that I use is called blur Bluebird, Alpine liqueur, which it's got, like all spice and some kind of like fresh herbs and stuff. So if you had fernet Branca?


    Bryan Robinson 2:35

    Nope.


    Jason Lengstorf 2:36

    So fernet Bronco, kind of tastes like mouthwash. This is like a a very, like, tune down version of that. So it's it. It has a hint of pine not like the taste of them.


    Bryan Robinson 2:48

    And what's the what's the hardest thing you've ever cooked?


    Jason Lengstorf 2:50

    Ooh, great question. Um, I would say probably the hardest thing I've ever cooked is. Well, I mean in terms of complexity, just Thanksgiving dinner, because you you effectively have to Gantt chart that you know, you've got one of in one stovetop and 15 dishes to cook. So how do you make sure that everything comes out on time still warm, that you're not like trying to stack something that was supposed to cook it for 50 and an oven, it's only a 325 you know that t

    Aisha Blake on accessibility, easier education and musical conference talks

    Aisha Blake on accessibility, easier education and musical conference talks

    Quick show notes


    Our Guest: Aisha Blake
    What she'd like for you to see: Gatsby Days - Feb. 3, 2020
    Who got Aisha into the JAMstack: Working as a volunteer, creating websites in Jekyll
    Her JAMstack Jams: The way it makes teaching easier
    Her musical Jam: Dear Evan Hansen Soundtrack


    Other things mentioned


    Gatsby
    Title of Conf
    self.conference


    Transcript

    Bryan Robinson 0:03

    Hello and welcome to another episode of That's My JAMstack the podcast asked the age old question, what's your jam in the JAMstack? On today's episode, we've got the amazing Aisha Blake. Aisha is a member of the Gatsby learning team, as well as being a teacher, speaker and conference organizer.


    Bryan Robinson 0:20

    Now this episode is jam packed with JAMstack goodness. But before we get into that, I wanted to welcome back our wonderful sponsor TakeShape. Stick around after the episode to hear more about their content platform or go ahead and head over while you're listening to TakeShape.io/thatsmyjamstack for more information.


    Bryan Robinson 0:40

    Hi Aisha, how's it going today? Thanks for being on the show.


    Aisha Blake 0:42

    Everything is great. Thank you for having me.


    Bryan Robinson 0:44

    All right. So So obviously, you're on the show to talk about the JAMstack stuff, but go ahead and give us a little introduction for who you are, what you do for work, what do you do for fun and that sort of thing?


    Aisha Blake 0:52

    Absolutely. So I am a brand new senior software engineer on Gatsby's learning team. I am -- I do a lot of things. I do a whole lot of things. I am an organizer for two conferences in Detroit. One is called self conference is half tech talks, half people focus talks. It has really, really great community and one is new. I am also organizing a conference called after one of my favorite musicals, which is going to be a musical tech conference.


    Bryan Robinson 1:33

    What?!


    Aisha Blake 1:33

    Oh, yes. Yes. So all of the performances, they'll be performances are going to be musical and/or theatrical, similar topics to any other tech conference. So the idea is that we're teaching people through performance art. I'm really excited about it.


    Bryan Robinson 1:56

    I'm now like, run through like, how would I do that? Like, because I speak at a few different conferences, how would I artistically render CSS talks


    Aisha Blake 2:05

    It was largely inspired by TailCall Optimization: The Musical, which was a brilliant, brilliant Disney parody. So three different Disney songs, teaching you about tail call optimization. At !!con last year. And I have been surprised like I this is like the intersection of everything I love. And I've been surprised how many people were already doing this kind of thing. Like, it's, it's really cool.


    Bryan Robinson 2:41

    Very nice. And when's that coming up?


    Aisha Blake 2:43

    That's going to be May 7 in Detroit, and self.conference is actually the following two days. So anybody who is interested in attending either one, you will have a little bit of a discount on the second ticket.


    Bryan Robinson 2:58

    Nice, very cool. Alright, so So obviously, we're not gonna be doing a musical here today because no one wants to hear me sing. That's for sure. So let's go ahead and talk about the JAMstack a little bit. So what was kind of your entry point into this idea of the jam stack or static sites? That sort of thing?


    Aisha Blake 3:13

    Yeah. So as far as static sites go, and it goes back to when I was learning to be a web developer, I was a volunteer, a Jesuit volunteer here in Detroit. That's how I actually came to the city. And I knew that I wanted to be a web developer, but I didn't really have I didn't really know how to connect to the skills that I had. So I have an Information Science degree. But I really didn't know how to take the computer science concepts that I had learned and apply them

    Ahmad Awais on the elegance of Markdown, education and simplification

    Ahmad Awais on the elegance of Markdown, education and simplification

    Quick show notes


    Our Guest: Ahmad Awais
    What he'd like for you to see: That it's important to keep educating and not overcomplicate things
    His JAMstack Jams: Markdown and all it's incredible uses
    His Musical Jam: The Greatest Showman Soundtrack


    Other Technology Mentioned


    Stripe
    VuePress
    React


    Our sponsor this week: TakeShape

    Transcript

    Bryan Robinson 0:02

    Hello everyone, welcome to another episode of That's My JAMstack the podcast where we asked the deep and complex question, what's your jam in the JAMstack? In today's episode we're talking with Ahmad Awais. Ahmad is a developer relations engineer at Cloudinary, a Google Developer expert and a prolific teacher.


    Bryan Robinson 0:19

    I'm also happy to welcome back once again, our sponsor TakeShape. Stick around after the show to learn more about their content platform or visit, takeshape.io/thatsmyjamstack for more information.


    Bryan Robinson 0:37

    Thanks for being on the podcast today. How's it going?


    Ahmad Awais 0:39

    I'm doing good. Thanks for having me.


    Bryan Robinson 0:41

    Great. So tell us a little bit about yourself. Tell us what you do for work, what you do for fun outside of technology and all that sort of stuff.


    Ahmad Awais 0:47

    Awesome. Awesome. So I'm actually right now the principal Developer Advocate for Cloudinary. I advocate for Javascript and open source. I have been spending a lot of time for the last years on being a full time open sourcer, where I build a lot of things related to web sort of a web purist, which has also kind of led me to be a Google Developers expert for web technologies. And I serve on the Node JS community committee.


    Ahmad Awais 1:17

    But I spent, I spent like this past life or about 13 years or so contributing to the WordPress core software, to WooCommerce into all sorts of things WordPress, but been always kind of directed for JavaScript. So when kind of JavaScript kind of took off, I knew that getting a promotion, I definitely moved to the React JS community. And then from there to NodeJS, I'm handling all of this and then JAMstack came into being and it's like what we always been doing, but with a better name, a better community and with better, you know, tooling and practices.


    Ahmad Awais 1:56

    So that's me apart from that. I come from a family Teachers, both my grandparents, both my parents. So teaching is sort of a genetic bug in me. So and I like to be sort of funny, at least I try to be. So I call this entertaining, education plus entertainment. So I entertain a lot in this course out on VSCode.pro, teaching people how I do a lot of development in less time, like 200 plus development workflows, and whatnot. So that's me.


    Bryan Robinson 2:28

    Nice. And now, outside of like the teaching and the and the technology, what do you do for fun?


    Ahmad Awais 2:34

    Ah, that is actually a tough one. So I'm actually an electrical engineer. They're like, they're, like 15 or so electrical engineers, my family before me. And all of them graduated from the same universities when I asked what should I do this at electrical engineering is what you should do. It's the mother field of computer science and everything. So but my hobby was actually writing blogs. I've been writing content for over 16 years now. So writing blogs, I ended up being a designer, the end front end developer then full stack. So that was the road that took me towards where I am right now. a software developer web developer, per se. So this used to be like my hobby that I used to do. It's now my job so I'm officially boring. But for years now I've been trying to pick up one another one other hobby, you know, for, for take something beyond this, but that thing came out to be teaching, but it's also related to this. So I organized a lot of meetups I go to, you know, different local events in talk about, you know, brain dumping what I did

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