216 episodes

Welcome to the Ask Mike Reinold Show, where we answer your questions about physical therapy, fitness, strength and conditioning, sports performance, baseball, business, career advice, and more. Join myself, Lenny Macrina, Dave Tilley, Dan Pope, Mike Scaduto and my team at Champion Physical Therapy and Performance in Boston, MA and learn how we help people feel better, move better, and perform better. Ask your questions at http://MikeReinold.com/AskMikeReinold and follow us at @mikereinold, @lenmacpt, @shift_movementscience, @fitnesspainfree, @mikescadutodpt, and @championptp.

The Ask Mike Reinold Show Mike Reinold: Physical Therapist and Performance Enhancement Specialist

    • Medicine
    • 4.8, 294 Ratings

Welcome to the Ask Mike Reinold Show, where we answer your questions about physical therapy, fitness, strength and conditioning, sports performance, baseball, business, career advice, and more. Join myself, Lenny Macrina, Dave Tilley, Dan Pope, Mike Scaduto and my team at Champion Physical Therapy and Performance in Boston, MA and learn how we help people feel better, move better, and perform better. Ask your questions at http://MikeReinold.com/AskMikeReinold and follow us at @mikereinold, @lenmacpt, @shift_movementscience, @fitnesspainfree, @mikescadutodpt, and @championptp.

    Restoring Muscle Function with Biofeedback

    Restoring Muscle Function with Biofeedback

    On this episode of the #AskMikeReinold show, I’m joined by Russ Paine to talk about the use of biofeedback in rehabilitation to restore volitional muscle contraction. To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 216: Restoring Muscle Function with Biofeedback



















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    Show Notes















    * Join my Inner Circle to view Russ’s presentation on the Use of Biofeedback in Rehabilitation* How to Restore Volitional Control After an Injury* Why You Should be Using Biofeedback















    Transcript







    Mike Reinold: Welcome back, everybody to the latest episode of the Ask Mike Reinold Show. I am here today, we’re going to flip the script again, and we’ve been doing this a bunch lately with obviously the COVID pandemic going on and us staying at home. Instead of us all being at Champion and answering your questions with my team there, what I’ve actually gotten to do is to team up with some of my friends and colleagues around the nation and ask them some questions. So instead of you guys listening to my garbage all the time and all my stupid answers, it’s time for me to ask some questions to some of the smart people that I know too.







    Mike Reinold: So, today we have a very special guest, my good friend Russ Paine from Houston, Texas. Russ is the Director of Sports Medicine at UT Physicians Sports Medicine Group. I hope I said that well. You guys have probably heard me talk about Russ in a lot of my presentations because a lot of the things that I’ve learned and I’ve done on the scapula and, heck, lots of things on the knee and neuromuscular control rehabilitation, all these things I’ve learned from Russ and people all the time. But Russ, to me, is one of those groups of like godfathers in sports’ physical therapy that have been very influential to me. So if it wasn’t for the pandemic, I feel like we wouldn’t be doing these things, right Russ? But it’s great to have you on the show, so welcome.







    Russ Paine: Thanks, Mike. Happy to be here.







    Mike Reinold: Yeah, it was awesome. So a few years ago now… It’s been, what? How many years since the mTrigger came out?







    Russ Paine: I think we hit the market two years ago.







    Mike Reinold: Two years?







    Russ Paine: We’ve been developing it for five years, so it’s been on the market for a year and a half, two years.

    • 22 min
    Restoring Knee Hyperextension Range of Motion

    Restoring Knee Hyperextension Range of Motion

    On this episode of the #AskMikeReinold show, we talk about our current thoughts on restoring knee hyperextension range of motion after surgery. We’ll cover how much we try to restore and what may influence our thought process. To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 215: Restoring Knee Hyperextension Range of Motion



















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    Show Notes















    * Assessing and Treating Loss of Knee Extension Range of Motion* Tips for Regaining Full Knee Extension After Surgery* Risk Factors Associated with Loss of Range of Motion Following ACL Reconstruction















    Transcript







    Mike Reinold: On this episode of the Ask Mike Reinold show, we talk about restoring hyperextension after knee surgery.







    Mike Reinold: Let’s see. Lynn from Arkansas said, or asks, “What should the goal be for knee extension post knee surgery, when the contralateral knee has excessive hyper extension?”







    Lenny Macrina: Whoa!







    Mike Reinold: It’s a good question. I feel like Lenny and I’s opinions, I don’t want to say change, because that seems wrong. I think they’ve evolved slightly over the years from where we’ve done, but Len, why don’t you answer this from your perspective as what you currently recommend and maybe some of the past thoughts on that too? Because I think a lot of people have learned something in the past and then just go right back to what they were doing 10 years ago, without thinking about some new stuff. So what’s your current thought process on this?







    Lenny Macrina: Without knowing what excessive hyperextension means in the question, I’m going to assume it’s that excessive like 10, 15 degrees of hyperextension, which is a lot for some people. But hyperextension is normal. If you measure people’s knees, they’re going to probably have four to six degrees easily of hyperextension.







    Lenny Macrina: So the excessive person, 10 to 15 degrees, I would say maybe 10, 15, 20 years ago, we would say, “Maybe that’s why you tore your ACL. Let’s just get to zero and you’ll be fine.” Then we got some research that had come out that showed that those people, longterm, don’t do as well. So they have anterior knee pain. They may get some arthritis in the front of their knee, like the patellofemoral joint. They just never get back to their sport,

    • 12 min
    Medical Screens in the Physical Therapy Setting

    Medical Screens in the Physical Therapy Setting

    On this episode of the #AskMikeReinold show, we talk about the use of general medical screens in the outpatient orthopedic and sports physical therapy settings. To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 214: Medical Screens in the Physical Therapy Setting



















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    You can use the player below to listen to the podcast or subscribe. If you are enjoying the podcast, PLEASE click here to leave us a review in iTunes, it will really mean a lot to us. THANKS!



















    Show Notes















    * How to Develop a Physical Therapy Treatment Plan and Program















    Transcript







    Mike Reinold: On this episode of the Ask Mike Reinold show, we talk about using general medical screens in the orthopedic physical therapy setting.







    Mike Reinold: We got another awesome… I think this is a pretty cool question. We haven’t talked about this yet, I don’t think on the podcast, which is kind of crazy, over 200 episodes. But Brendan from Florida says, “Hey guys, love the show and everything you guys do for the profession. As a new grad therapist, I’m working in outpatient orthopedics in a predominantly underserved population area. I find myself performing a lot of medical screens of other systems to rule out more sinister pathology like GI, cardiac, et cetera, more frequently than I thought I would be doing. Do you guys do this in your setting, and can you speak about any past and previous experiences of missing something that turned out to be non-musculoskeletal?”







    Dave Tilley: Got one.







    Mike Reinold: So yeah. I know, I definitely have some stories too, and I think we have some decent advice, but I don’t know, what are we starting with this, right? So we’re outpatient orthopedic, you could argue we’re probably high end orthopedic/sports. Most physical therapy clinics in the world have sports in their name. You drive by and there’s no athletes anywhere near them, right? So most people aren’t sports. We’re probably what? What would you guys say, 80% sports? Meaning an actual athlete that plays on a sport with a team, you know? So we’re like 80% sports, so I don’t know. I feel like most of our people come to us with very specific things, that doesn’t mean that they have some underlying things we have, but who wants to start? Anybody have stories? Maybe we’ll start by sharing some stories so that way we can do that experience, talk about the experience. So Dave, you said you had one.







    Dave Tilley: Yeah. I’ll say one, answering point too is that I think that there is still obviously not medical, in terms of different systems, but there’s still a lot of red flags that we have to look out for as sports like ruling out a stress fracture, or ruling out something that’s a little bit more serious in nature, and I think that is important to remember if you work in sports. That it’s not all casual. But yeah, the best experience that I had was I evaluated somebody for neck p...

    • 15 min
    Building Your Own Brand as a Physical Therapist

    Building Your Own Brand as a Physical Therapist

    On this episode of the #AskMikeReinold show we talk about some of the ways that a physical therapist (or fitness specialist) can build their own personal brand the right way, and without your employer being annoyed. To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 213: Building Your Own Brand as a Physical Therapist



















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    You can use the player below to listen to the podcast or subscribe. If you are enjoying the podcast, PLEASE click here to leave us a review in iTunes, it will really mean a lot to us. THANKS!



















    Show Notes















    * How to Build Your Social Media Presence as a Physical Therapy Student* The Good and Bad of Education on Social Media















    Transcript







    Mike Reinold: On this episode of the Ask Mike Reinold show, we talk about building your own personal brand as a physical therapist.







    Mike Reinold: We got a good question here. This is a good one that I think is going to be good for this crew. I wanted to kind of talk to you guys about this, but Brian, from Los Angeles, asked, “Mike, you have a team of physical therapists that all have their own brands and side businesses educating in their field of expertise. Unfortunately, you don’t see that often with other employers. How do we push our profession forward to see this type of model and PT practices as beneficial instead of employers viewing their employees having brands as negatives.” Honestly, it’s a lot. While you guys gather your thoughts, let me think a little bit here and I think it’s kind of funny.







    Mike Reinold: Let me hit the end of that while you guys think about it because I want to hear it from your perspectives as the employees with the brands. And maybe Lenny can talk a little bit too as an employer, but I want to talk about that last part, about this being a negative. I have no idea why an employer would consider this a negative. I mean, what are they worried about? You going around the corner and open up your own shop? I mean, that’s the only negative, right? Is that you’ll leave and do your own thing. But whether you have a brand or you don’t, if you have an entrepreneurial spirit, if you’re a business type of person, that type of thing, and you’re dying to open up your PT practice, then you’re probably going to do it anyway, right? I don’t know, we never fear our employees leaving to do other things because it probably means it’s a better opportunity for them and we’re supportive of that decision, right?







    Mike Reinold: So it’s funny, we’ve had, I don’t know even, over the years, people tend to come and go a little bit, right? We’ve had a few employees give their notice-







    Mike Reinold: And they’re that, yeah. We have a few employees give their notice and they’re always like,

    • 19 min
    Returning to Weight Training After a Sports Hernia

    Returning to Weight Training After a Sports Hernia

    On this episode of the #AskMikeReinold show, we talk about getting back to weight training and sports activities after both sports hernias and inguinal hernias. To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 212: Returning to Weight Training After a Sports Hernia



















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    You can use the player below to listen to the podcast or subscribe. If you are enjoying the podcast, PLEASE click here to leave us a review in iTunes, it will really mean a lot to us. THANKS!



















    Show Notes















    * The Best Ways for a Physical Therapist to Start Learning About Weight Training* How to Periodize Strength Training After ACL Surgery* Dan Pope’s Fitness Pain Free Certification Course















    Transcript







    Mike Reinold: On this episode of the Ask Mike Reinold show, we talk about returning to weight training after sport and inguinal hernias.







    Mike Reinold: So, all right, let’s get into it. We got a nice question today from Russell from Virginia. Russell says, “Hey, Mike and team. Big fan of the show. I’ve been diagnosed with a bilateral hernia, no imaging done, just manual testing by a general surgeon and urologist. The surgeon says back squatting under heavy load or other heavy core or ab strain can cause further tearing if not fixed surgically, and could also reoccur after surgery. My preferred style of training is power lifting and I’d be somewhat bummed if it’s a risk to me to go back to lifting heavy afterward. What are your thoughts on power lifting or high intensity core exercises with a hernia, or after a mesh repair? Have you worked with patients or clients with the same issue?”







    Mike Reinold: So I’ll start off a little bit with this answer by saying, Russell asked here via a hernia and we weren’t a hundred percent sure if he was referring to an inguinal or a sport hernia. So why don’t we tackle that first? Anybody want to define the difference quickly before we get into maybe what it means to get back to lifting?







    Dan Pope: You want me to take the inguinal part?







    Mike Reinold: I feel like you’re going to answer this whole thing, Dan, but why don’t you tell us a little bit about what the difference between an inguinal and a sport hernia is?







    Dan Pope: Yeah. So inguinal hernia, you can also have an umbilical hernia. There’s a femoral hernia too. And I think the easiest way to describe that is when your insides are trying to get onto the outside, right, and there’s some sort of tear in some of the musculature and the abdominal wall, and then you have your intestines are poking out. Yeah. So that’s the short of that. Did you want to answer the sports hernia part?

    • 14 min
    Not All Research is the Same: The Difference Between Good and Bad Research

    Not All Research is the Same: The Difference Between Good and Bad Research

    On this episode of the #AskMikeReinold show, I’m joined by Phil Page to discuss the current state of scientific evidence and journal articles in the physical therapy world. Not all evidence is good evidence. Here’s how to stay current with the best research.







    For those interested in learning more, Phil has a presentation for my Inner Circle Online Mentorship group that digs in really deep on these topics.







    To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 211: Not All Research is the Same: The Difference Between Good and Bad Research



















    Listen and Subscribe to Podcast







    You can use the player below to listen to the podcast or subscribe. If you are enjoying the podcast, PLEASE click here to leave us a review in iTunes, it will really mean a lot to us. THANKS!



















    Show Notes















    * See Phil’s presentations on understanding and reading research in my Inner Circle* Tips on Reading Research Articles* What is Evidence Based Practice















    Transcript







    Mike Reinold: Welcome back everybody to the latest episode of the Ask Mike Reinold show. I am with my good friend Phil Page. Phil and I just spent the last couple hours or so now kind of filming some presentations for my Inner Circle on research, which is one of the areas that I think Phil is awesome at. He’s obviously one of the people I’ve looked to over my career on how to learn, how to read journal articles and digest information from them and understanding good research and bad research. And I’ve seen him speak and do a bunch of things over the years. So Phil’s the man for that and I’ve been trying to get what for like, what was it two years you think Phil?







    Phil Page: Two years.







    Mike Reinold: Yeah, two years. I’m just like, “Hey man, you got to fill in these presentations for my Inner Circle. I think everybody would love them.” So anyway, thank you for doing that. If you’re not a member of my Inner Circle, you’ve got to check it out. But I also wanted to do a special podcast episode because him and I were talking and I have a lot of questions. So Phil, before we get started a little bit, just tell everybody a little bit about yourself.







    Phil Page: Yeah, thanks Mike. So I am Research Director and Assistant Professor in physical therapy at Franciscan University here in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. It’s a new program. We’re just finishing up our second cohort. So it’s a new school and I spent the last 20 years working with Performance Health as their Director of Research and Education. And I’ve been a research geek since my first year of college.

    • 25 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
294 Ratings

294 Ratings

Garrett Holle ,

Well done!

Top notch content with some training room laughs

msnakita ,

Finding a PT job during COVID

Great ideas and positive messages from the "Crew" ;-) for all those affected by the collapse in ortho rehab!

Ethan "Mr.Kinesiology" ,

Extremely enjoyable and educational content!

I’m a senior Pre-PT student and Mike Reinold is someone who has really allowed me to foster my passion for Physical Therapy!! I always listen to his podcasts while driving and it’s disappointing when my drives end. I think there should be a rule that after listening to all of The Mike Reinold Show podcasts, you should be allowed to skip PT school and be given exemption from the NPTE!! Just kidding! But, I’ve learned so much!
Thanks Mike, Lenny, Dave, Mike S, and Dan for teaching us and the laughs you given many of us along the way! *cough shoulder impingement *cough is a cool topic *cough *cough

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