369 episodes

The tides of American history lead through the streets of New York City — from the huddled masses on Ellis Island to the sleazy theaters of 1970s Times Square. The elevated railroad to the Underground Railroad. Hamilton to Hammerstein! Greg and Tom explore more than 400 years of action-packed stories, featuring both classic and forgotten figures who have shaped the world. 

The Bowery Boys: New York City Histor‪y‬ Bowery Boys Media

    • History
    • 4.7 • 2.6K Ratings

The tides of American history lead through the streets of New York City — from the huddled masses on Ellis Island to the sleazy theaters of 1970s Times Square. The elevated railroad to the Underground Railroad. Hamilton to Hammerstein! Greg and Tom explore more than 400 years of action-packed stories, featuring both classic and forgotten figures who have shaped the world. 

    Rewind: Harlem Nights at the Hotel Theresa

    Rewind: Harlem Nights at the Hotel Theresa

    The Hotel Theresa is considered a genuine (if under-appreciated) Harlem gem, both for its unique architecture and its special place in history as the hub for African-American life in the 1940s and 50s.

    The luxurious apartment hotel was built by a German lace manufacturer to cater to a wealthy white clientele. But almost as soon as the final brick was laid, Harlem itself changed, thanks to the arrival of thousands of new black residents from the South.

    Harlem, renown the world over for the artists and writers of the Harlem Renaissance and its burgeoning music scene, was soon home to New York’s most thriving black community.  But many of the businesses here refused to serve black patrons, or at least certainly made them unwelcome.

    The Theresa changed its policy in 1940 and soon its lobby was filled with famous athletes, actresses and politicians, many choosing to live at the Hotel Theresa over other hotels in Manhattan.  The hotel’s relative small size made it an interesting concentration of America’s most renown black celebrities.

    In this podcast, Greg gives you a tour of this glamorous scene, from the corner bar to the penthouse, from the breakfast table of Joe Louis to the crazy parties of Dinah Washington.

    WITH: Martin Luther King Jr,Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Fidel Castro. And music by Sarah Vaughan, Billy Eckstine and Duke Ellington

    ALSO: Who is this mysterious Theresa? What current Congressman was a former desk clerk? And what was Joe Louis’ favorite breakfast food?

    The first half of this show was originally released in 2013 (as Episode #158) but has been newly edited for this release. The second half of this show is ALL NEW.

    boweryboyshistory.com

    MUSIC FEATURED: "Sophisticated Lady" by Duke Ellington and His Orchestra and "Dedicated To You" by Billy Eckstine and Sarah Vaughan. 

    Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/boweryboys

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 26 min
    #352 The Birth of Black Harlem

    #352 The Birth of Black Harlem

    How did Harlem become Harlem, the historic center of Black culture, politics and identity in American life? This is the story of revolutionary ideas -- and radical real estate.

    By the 1920s, Harlem had become the capital of Black America, where so many African-American thinkers, artists, writers, musicians and entrepreneurs would live and work that it would spawn -- a Harlem Renaissance.

    But in an era of so much institutional racism -- the oppression of Jim Crow, an ever-present reality in New York -- how did Black Harlem come to be?

    The story of Harlem begins more than three and a half centuries ago with the small Dutch village of Nieuw Haarlem (New Haarlem).

    During the late 19th century Harlem became the home of many different immigrant groups -- white immigrant groups, Irish and German, Italian and Eastern European Jews -- staking their claim of the American dream in newly developed housing here.

    But then an extraorindary shift occurs beginning in the first decade of the 20th century, a very specific set of circumstances that allowed, really for the very first time, African-American New Yorkers to stake out a piece of that same American dream for themselves.

    This is a story of real estate -- and realtors! But not just any realtor, but the story of the man who earned the nickname the Father of Harlem.

    Part one of a two-part show on the origins of Harlem.

    boweryboyshistory.com

    patreon.com/boweryboys

    Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/boweryboys

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 53 min
    #351 Auntie Mame (Bowery Boys Movie Club)

    #351 Auntie Mame (Bowery Boys Movie Club)

    In the latest episode of the Bowery Boys Movie Club, Tom and Greg celebrate wild and fabulous Auntie Mame, the outrageous comedy masterpiece starring Rosalind Russell that’s mostly set on Beekman Place, the pocket enclave of New York wealth that transforms into a haven for oddballs and bohemian eccentrics.

    Auntie Mame cleverly uses historical events — the Wall Street Crash of 1929, the Great Depression — as a backdrop to Mame’s own financial woes, and her progressive-minded care of nephew Patrick introduces some rather avant garde philosophies to movie-going audiences.

    Listen in as the Bowery Boys set up the film’s history, then give a rollicking synopsis through the zany plot line.

    boweryboyshistory.com 

    To listen to future episodes of the Bowery Boys Movie Club, support the Bowery Boys podcast on Patreon! For those who support us there already, check your emails or head over to your Patreon page for a new episode -- on the 1961 classic Breakfast At Tiffany's.

    Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/boweryboys

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 1 hr 19 min
    #350 The World Trade Center in the 1970s

    #350 The World Trade Center in the 1970s

    The World Trade Center opened its distinctive towers during one of New York City's most difficult decades, a beacon of modernity in a city beleaguered by debt and urban decay. Welcome to the 1970s. 

    This year, believe it or not, marks the 20th anniversary of the attacks on the Twin Towers on September 11, 2001. Today there’s an entire generation that only knows the World Trade Center as an emblem of tragedy. 

    But people sometimes forget that the World Trade Center, designed by Japanese-American architect Minoru Yamasaki, was a very complicated addition to the New York skyline when it officially opened in 1973.

    While it might be fun to think of New York City in the 1970s through the lens of places like Studio 54 or CBGB, it was really the Twin Towers that redefined New York.

    The journey to build the world's tallest building and its expansive complex of office towers and underground shops began in an effort by David Rockefeller to stimulate development in Manhattan's fading Financial District. 

    By the time Port Authority got onboard to fund the project, the Twin Towers were bonded together with another vital project -- a commuter train from New Jersey. 

    The World Trade Center inspired strong opinions from critics and the public alike, but eventually many grew to admire the strange towers which marked the skyline. 

    And some, the Twin Towers became objects of obsession. 

    FEATURING: The insane, completely outlandish and ultimately successful feat of acrobatics by a very bold French tightrope walker. 

    PLUS: An interview with with Kate Monaghan Connolly of the National September 11 Memorial and Museum about how that institution memorializes those lost in the tragedy while still celebrating the technological marvels that once stood there.

    boweryboyshistory.com

    Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/boweryboys

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 1 hr 7 min
    Rewind: Strange Hoaxes of the 19th Century

    Rewind: Strange Hoaxes of the 19th Century

    PODCAST REWIND Stories of outrageous hoaxes perpetrated upon New Yorkers in the early 19th century.

    In the 1820s, the Erie Canal would completely change the fortunes of the young United States, turning the port city of New York into one of the most important in the world. But an even greater engineering challenge was necessary to prevent the entire southern part of Manhattan from sinking into the harbor!

    That is, if you believed a certain charlatan hanging out at the market…..

    One decade later, the burgeoning penny press would give birth to another tremendous fabrication and kick off an uneasy association between the media and the truth. In the summer of 1835 the New York Sun reported on startling discoveries from one of the world’s most famous astronomers. Life on the moon!

    Indeed, vivid moon forests populated with a menagerie of bizarre creatures and winged men with behaviors similar those of men on Earth.

    boweryboyshistory.com

    A version of this show was originally released on July 8, 2016.

    Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/boweryboys

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 47 min
    Wondery Presents: The Apology Line

    Wondery Presents: The Apology Line

    If you could call a number and say you’re sorry, and no one would know…what would you apologize for? For fifteen years, you could call a number in Manhattan and do just that. This is the story of the line, and the man at the other end who became consumed by his own creation. He was known as “Mr. Apology.” As thousands of callers flooded the line, confessing to everything from shoplifting to infidelity, drug dealing to murder, Mr. Apology realized he couldn’t just listen. He had to do something, even if it meant risking everything. From Wondery the makers of Dr. Death and The Shrink Next Door, comes a story about empathy, deception and obsession. Marissa Bridge, who knew Mr. Apology better than anyone, hosts this six episode series.

    Listen today at wondery.fm/BoweryBoysPodcast

    Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/boweryboys

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 6 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
2.6K Ratings

2.6K Ratings

Lynn_in_NC ,

Takes me back to my days in New York!

I love Bowery Boys! The hosts have a great chemistry and are fun to listen to. There’s so much history in NYC that, fortunately, I don’t think they’ll ever run out of material. Keep up the great work!

JAmerican in the Midwest ,

Cure for homesick New Yorkers

Keep up the fabulous programming. Thank you!

GerrySpring ,

Outstanding

Excellent job by both hosts!

Top Podcasts In History

Listeners Also Subscribed To